21 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Today's Web giants want us to believe that they and they alone are suited to take us to wherever we end up next. Having used Adversarial Interoperability as a ladder to attain their rarefied heights, they now use laws to kick the ladder away and prevent the next Microcomputer Center or Tim Berners-Lee from doing to them what the Web did to Gopher, and what Gopher did to mainframes.
  2. Feb 2020
    1. Spotify is directly mimicking Google and Facebook, and attempting to roll up power over digital audio markets the way Google and Facebook did over the internet. It has already done so in music. Here’s Rolling Stone, reporting on Spotify’s exploitation of its public utility platform of music distribution to organizes payola-style extortion against artists.
  3. Jan 2020
    1. and hand control to Big Ag

      How the fuck did big agrobusinesses get so big? Don't these GMO skeptics want to talk about that? About monopolies and anti-trust laws in general? and regulatory capture in other fields as well? Aren't these related issues whereby preventing either of these would have averted the big ag crisis we see today?

      We need discussions around these connected points and not in isolation

  4. Nov 2019
  5. Feb 2019
    1. It’s not just logging off of Facebook; it’s logging off the countless websites that use Facebook to log in. It’s not just using DuckDuckGo instead of Google search; it’s abandoning my email, switching browsers, giving up a smartphone, and living life without mapping apps. It’s not just refusing to buy toilet paper on Amazon.com; it’s being blocked from reading giant swaths of the internet that are hosted on Amazon servers, giving up websites and apps that I didn’t previously know were connected to the biggest internet giant of them all.

      Few of us understand the reach of these companies and how ubiquitous they are. It's not just the original companies themselves but how many other companies they've bought to gain control of data. These are the robber barons of the 21 century, controlling a vast monopoly of personal information in a consumer economy.

  6. Nov 2018
    1. In total, Facebook managed to string together 67 unchallenged acquisitions, which seems impressive, unless you consider that Amazon undertook 91 and Google got away with 214 (a few of which were conditioned). In this way, the tech industry became essentially composed of just a few giant trusts: Google for search and related industries, Facebook for social media, Amazon for online commerce. While competitors remained in the wings, their positions became marginalized with every passing day.
    2. When a dominant firm buys its a nascent challenger, alarm bells are supposed to ring. Yet both American and European regulators found themselves unable to find anything wrong with the takeover.
  7. Jun 2018
    1. LinkedIn not only connects you with other professionals but also with companies and recruiters. The company has uniquely positioned itself as the only platform worthy of professional networking.
  8. Jan 2018
  9. doc-0s-c0-docs.googleusercontent.com doc-0s-c0-docs.googleusercontent.com
    1. The concern of net neutrality supporters is not that major media outlets will find a new way to slug it out with each other for market share, but that everyone else—bloggers, niche news sources and small websites generally—will be priced out of the market for priority service and consigned to a much poorer internet experience

      The internet will not be openly available to those who make a living off of it due to the equal price that will be more out of the price range of some people.

  10. doc-0o-c0-docs.googleusercontent.com doc-0o-c0-docs.googleusercontent.com
    1. It wasn’t all that long ago (well, at least, when you’re my age) that one network—AT&T—ran the whole show.

      Beginning of historical example of AT&T's monopoly.

    2. In spite of all the monopolist’s alarm bells that this decision meant the end of network qualityand the end of reliable service as we knew it, just the opposite came to pass. The idea of having a network that couldn’t discriminate against innovators who wanted to improve it finallybegan to break the choke-hold that the gatekeeper had on the system.

      Conclusion to the history of AT&T example of monopoly of an industry.

    3. previous telecommunications and media technologies, also conceived in openness, eventually fell victim to consolidated control bya few powerful interests, speculative mania by investors, and mistaken government policies which assumed that wise public policywas no public policy.

      General reference to history of monopoly of telecommunications when no gov. policies are in place.

    4. Allowing gigantic corporations—in manycases, monopolyor duopoly broadband Internet access service providers—to exercise unfettered control over Americans’ access to the Internet not only creates risks to technological innovation and economic growth, but it poses a real threat to freedom of speech and the future of our democracy.

      Potential risks of no net neutrality.

    5. turning point in the struggle to ensure the continued openness of the Internet against powerful gatekeeper control.

      Net Neutrality established to keep internet open and safe from monopoly.

  11. Jan 2017
  12. Dec 2016
    1. In the first quarter of 2016, 85 cents of every new dollar spent in online advertising will go to Google or Facebook, according to Brian Nowak, an analyst with Morgan Stanley.

      This is stunning.

  13. Jun 2016
    1. Captains of Industry or Robber Barons. The choice is yours to decide. The first image shows the American people entrance to the senate was closed while the monopolist not only were allowed to enter but overlooked the senate. The second photo shows how the two headed monster monopoly had immigrants, farmers, banks and pretty much any organization in its industry become crashed and manipulated under the chief robber barons of that time. "IN THE 50 years between the end of the American civil war in 1865 and the outbreak of the first world war in 1914, a group of entrepreneurs spearheaded America’s transformation from an agricultural into an industrial society, built gigantic business empires and amassed huge fortunes. In 1848 John J. Astor, a merchant trader, was America’s richest man with $20m (now $545m). By the time the United States entered the first world war, John D. Rockefeller had become its first billionaire."(econ) This was the reason the Sherman AntiTrust Act was put into place. To regulate business and ensure that no one has too much power

      http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21637338-todays-tech-billionaires-have-lot-common-previous-generation-capitalist