20 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2019
    1. The Piri Reis map is a world map compiled in 1513 from military intelligence by the Ottoman admiral and cartographer Piri Reis (pronounced [piɾi ɾeis]). Approximately one third of the map survives; it shows the western coasts of Europe and North Africa and the coast of Brazil with reasonable accuracy. Various Atlantic islands, including the Azores and Canary Islands, are depicted, as is the mythical island of Antillia and possibly Japan. The map's historical importance lies in its demonstration of the extent of global exploration of the New World by approximately 1510, and in its claim to have used a map of Christopher Columbus, otherwise lost, as a source. Piri also stated that he had used ten Arab sources and four Indian maps sourced from the Portuguese. More recently, the map has been the focus of claims for the pre-modern exploration of the Antarctic coast.
    1. Setting your school in Scholar Preferences will help you make direct connections to online sources provided by your library.

      This is an interesting tip. It can definitely be useful to connect your school to the Scholar Preferences so they can give you articles that you definitely have access to or books.

    2. If you want to locate sources in many different libraries, add WorldCat in addition to your library
    1. Most of the time, the first statements we try are not the best, even though Google or another search tool we’re using may give us many results.

      It is important to not be lazy when it comes to researching. Always look for quality posts rather than quantity no matter how many results turn up. Revision is key.

    1. Sean Cavanagh, Associate Editor for Education Week, writes about the use of technology to benefit the career development of students. This article focuses on the K-12 sector, but this implementation at this level is important because it will influence these students when they pursue their career choices, often in Higher Education. This article outlines specific technologies and partnerships that schools are utilizing and shows the investment that students show when given these career opportunities to guide themselves toward.

      Rating: 8/10

  2. Mar 2019
    1. 6 Effective Strategies for Teaching Adults

      This article from Point Park University provides several methods one can use to help educate adults. Ideas presented include ensuring content is relevant, knowing the audience, igniting emotion in the audience, ensuring assignments are attainable, and providing constructive feedback. I find these especially helpful because of my work, which often involves teaching adults who are busy and sometimes uninterested in my content. The section that will help me most is "Encourage Exploration." Because I'm training on a software tool, I want learners to go into the software and make mistakes and learn from them. I want them to poke around! It can be difficult to convince a class of disgruntled 60-year-old men who are mad that things are changing to go play with a complex software tool like children. 7/10

  3. Mar 2018
    1. starts every project by visually exploring the available activity data collected on Spotify users.
    2. analysts often just look at numbers: summary statistics like mean, median and spread. They don't always engage in visual data exploration.
  4. Mar 2017
    1. On my farm I see the hope of a rainy August. I see all kinds of forbs for my sheep to eat. Deep rooted docks and Queen Anne’s lace, plaintain weed and hop clover and red clover and white clover. Fescue and chicory. It is a meadow fit for a ruminant. Usually it is pith dry. Sometimes the fallen and broken branches get trampled further by our sheep and as they walk through they sound like marimbas being janked around by a hyperactive eight year old. Yes, this August is rare. I hope that #ccourses is a rainy August.

      This is a rainy April.

      I am taking the time to read closely.

    1. I wanted to have adventures, change costumes and live many lives.

      Exploration of the internet and identification

    1. Bluenose caribou herd

      Many of the same concerns regarding the well-being of the Bluenose caribou herd in the Berger Inquiry are still being discussed today due to continued industrial exploration, specifically regarding oil and gas, in the Northwest Territories and the Arctic. Since oil and gas are still valued resources in our current societies, exploration continues in the North, as described by Anne Dunn and her colleagues in the 2009 Arctic publication. These concerns include changes of habitat due to the introduction or industrial development such as roads, oilfields, mines, etc. The attraction of job opportunity to areas surrounding the Bluenose caribou herd could potentially cause an increase in demand of caribou meat. Increased income as a result of employment for industrial exploration allows for the advancement of hunting methods regarding the locating of caribou and utilization of year-round roads implemented originally for industrial exploration. The concerns regarding the Bluenose East and Bluenose West caribou herds of the Northwest Territories result specifically from oil and gas exploration (Gunn et al. 2009, iii).

      Besides industrial exploration, there are concerns about the population and survival of the Bluenose caribou herd surrounding climate trends. Specifically, warmer temperatures will affect the environmental conditions in which the caribou rely on for sustenance. An increased temperature in the wintertime could correspond to more freeze-thaw cycles (Gunn et al. 2009, iii).

      Regarding population size, according to the Arctic journal, “migratory wild reindeer and caribou numbers have dropped by about one-third since populations peaked in the 1990s and early 2000s”. There are natural periods of abundance and scarcity among migratory tundra caribou herds. These increases and decreases in population size are likely results of “continental climate switches” (Gunn et al. 2009, iii). According to the Northwest Territories Environment and Natural Resources division, the Bluenose West caribou herd was estimated to have population of 112,000 in 1992. In 2015, its population was estimated to be approximately 15,000. The Bluenose East caribou herd was estimated to have a population of 104,000 in 2000. In 2015, its population was estimated to be between 35,000 and 40,000 (Northwest Territories).

      References

      Gunn, Anne, Don Russell, Robert G. White, and Gary<br> Kofinas. "Facing a Future of Change: Wild<br> Migratory Caribou and Reindeer." Arctic 62, no. 3 (2009): Iii-Vi. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40513303.

      Northwest Territories: Environment and Natural Resources. "Barren-ground Caribou: Northern Herds." Environment and Natural Resources. Accessed March 08, 2017. http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/node/2979.

    2. seismic exploration camps

      Seismic exploration camps are outposts of southern oil and gas exploration activities. They are constructed to shelter scientists during their surveys of the north in search of oil and gas resources. Geologists and related scientists set off explosions to induce waves underground. Theses waves 'echo' off the different layers of material allowing geologists to interpret if/where oil and/or gas could be located.

      Though it is considered a non-invasive way to see into the subsurface when compared to drilling test holes, creating the infrastructure to allow seismic exploration to take pace and setting off explosions takes a toll on arctic ecosystems. In his book Unfreezing the Arctic Andrew Stuhl "This method [seismic] required the use of several tracked vehicles in a caravan, setting off blasts and collecting the data from them, and gashing vast stretches of the Arctic landscape" (Stuhl 114).

      Legacy of this seismic exploration is felt today, as the scars Stuhl references still exist.

      For more information and photos visit: (https://www.fws.gov/refuge/arctic/seismic.html )

      Stuhl, Andrew. Unfreezing The Arctic. 1st ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Print.

  5. Sep 2016
    1. young people teach themselves through play and exploration and then, when ready to do so, begin naturally to put what they have learned to purposes that benefit the group as a whole.
  6. Feb 2016
    1. nd C
      1. Through persuasion and the belief that Cortez was the God Quetzalcoatl the Spaniards entered in peacefully and captured Montezuma.
      2. The Sistema de Castas organized individuals into racial groups based on their supposed "purity of blood".
      3. This racial hierarchy was created as a prerequisites for social and political advancement. Iberian-born Spaniards occupied the highest levels of administration. Their descendants, New World born Spaniards occupied the next rung. Those mixed with Spanish and Indian heritage followed.
    2. encomienda

      Image Description

      This is an image I found on the internet of the five classes of people in New Spain.

      1. How does internal tension in the Native American empires of the Americas aid Spanish attempts to create their empire?
      2. The Spanish wanted to take over the natives land because of the wealth and happiness it could bring to them. Central and South America was rumored to have fortunes around the land.

      3. In the biological exchange between Europeans and Native Americans, what diseases, plants, and animals were exchanged? The diseases that Europeans brought over to the Americas were measles, smallpox and influenza. Domesticated animals, squash, beans, corn and tobacco were among the many things traded between the Native Americans and the Europeans.

      4. What are the ways that European powers claim their right to claim land in the Americas?

      5. The pope authorized the Europeans to claim the land, claimed they discovered the land, and claiming they improved the land from the people they took it over from.
    3. Huge expeditions, resembling vast moving communities, composed of hundreds of soldiers, settlers, priests, and slaves, with enormous numbers of livestock, moved across the continent.

      It is amazing how many people risked their own lives just to come to America because they knew that they could make money off of what was already there.

  7. Jan 2016
    1. They ruled their empire through a decentralized network of subject peoples that paid regular tribute–including everything from the most basic items, such as corn, beans, and other foodstuffs, to luxury goods such as jade, cacao, and gold–and provided troops for the empire.

      The Spanish was trying to take control over North and Central America. They were taking away valued goods from the Native Americans and made money off of it.

  8. Nov 2015
    1. we have to experiment

      Which is quite different from solutionnism. Hill and Feldstein aren’t saying that we need to individualize at all costs and they’ve come out against some aspects of the great unbundling. But we can all try different things, see what sticks, what the implications are. In times of crises, we have no choice but to innovate.

  9. Jan 2014
    1. This exploration may itself lead to novel discoveries, but will also help the biologist better understand the quality and nature of the dataset, improving his or her ability to suggest analyses to computational colleagues.

      Exploration may lead to novel discoveries