170 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Résumé de la vidéo [00:00:00][^1^][1] - [00:27:22][^2^][2]:

      Cette vidéo présente un webinaire sur l'éducation ouverte et les ressources éducatives libres, organisé par le réseau des leaders en ressources éducatives libres et l'Université de Montréal. Il aborde l'importance de l'accès libre à l'éducation, les politiques de soutien, et les pratiques inspirantes dans le domaine.

      Points forts: + [00:00:20][^3^][3] Introduction au webinaire * Présentation par Marie des Martels * Reconnaissance territoriale + [00:04:01][^4^][4] Contexte du projet * Soutien de l'UNESCO et objectifs de développement durable * Retard des universités québécoises en ressources éducatives libres + [00:14:06][^5^][5] Soutien du ministère * Importance de l'intégration du numérique en enseignement supérieur * Initiatives pour la formation à distance et les ressources éducatives + [00:16:30][^6^][6] Principes de l'éducation ouverte * Élimination des barrières et favorisation de l'inclusion * Utilisation des licences libres et partage des connaissances + [00:26:02][^7^][7] Licences Creative Commons * Explication des licences et des 5 permissions de "royal" * Recommandation de l'UNESCO pour les ressources éducatives libres Résumé de la vidéo [00:27:25][^1^][1] - [00:50:12][^2^][2]: La vidéo présente des témoignages d'éducateurs et de professionnels sur l'importance des ressources éducatives libres (REL) et l'éducation ouverte. Ils partagent leurs expériences et projets visant à promouvoir l'accès libre et la collaboration dans le domaine éducatif.

      Points forts: + [00:27:25][^3^][3] Collaboration éducative * Importance de la co-création * Partage des connaissances + [00:28:05][^4^][4] Projet étudiant * Bourses pour création de REL * Valorisation des productions étudiantes + [00:29:30][^5^][5] Fabrique REAL et réseau des leaders * Projets pour l'éducation ouverte * Financement par le ministère + [00:33:46][^6^][6] Wikipédia et éducation * Potentiel pédagogique * Importance pour les étudiants + [00:37:47][^7^][7] Site web de ressources libres * Engagement moral envers les étudiants * Matériel pédagogique gratuit + [00:48:07][^8^][8] Vision de l'éducation ouverte * Éducation accessible à tous * Partage global des ressources éducatives Résumé de la vidéo 00:50:15 - 01:15:24: La vidéo présente une discussion sur l'éducation ouverte et l'importance de rendre l'apprentissage accessible à tous. Les participants partagent leurs perspectives sur la co-création, l'interdépendance des acteurs éducatifs, et l'importance de l'engagement individuel pour faire avancer l'éducation ouverte.

      Points forts: + [00:50:15][^1^][1] L'appel à l'action collective * Importance de l'éducation comme priorité + [00:52:03][^2^][2] Passion pour l'éducation ouverte * Conviction et engagement partagés + [00:54:02][^3^][3] Lien entre éducation et recherche * Nécessité d'une approche intégrée + [00:55:04][^4^][4] Motivation et interdépendance * Rôle clé des différentes parties prenantes + [00:56:49][^5^][5] Les étudiants comme acteurs clés * Créateurs et consommateurs de ressources éducatives + [01:03:48][^6^][6] Le domaine public comme ressource * Potentiel négligé pour l'éducation Résumé de la vidéo [01:15:26][^1^][1] - [01:16:55][^2^][2]:

      La partie 4 de la vidéo aborde l'éducation ouverte, les obstacles systémiques à l'éducation, et l'importance de l'inclusion des étudiants et des groupes marginalisés. Elle souligne l'alignement avec les recommandations de l'UNESCO de 2019.

      Points forts: + [01:15:26][^3^][3] Éducation ouverte * Réflexion sur les obstacles * Développement impliquant les étudiants + [01:15:52][^4^][4] Groupes marginalisés * Préoccupation pour l'inclusion * Perspective intentionnelle sur la diversité + [01:16:13][^5^][5] Recommandations de l'UNESCO * Alignement avec les recommandations de 2019 * Discussion sur l'engagement et la production du webinaire

    1. scholastic learning

      How much different things may have been if the state, and not the Church, had been the progenitor and supporter of the early university?

      How might education have been different if it came out of itself (or something like curiosity or even society in general) without the influences on either church or state?

  2. Aug 2023
    1. If leisure and political power requirethis education, everybody in America now requires it, andeverybody where democracy and industrialization penetratewill ultimately require it. If the people are not capable ofacquiring this education, they should be deprived of politicalpower and probably of leisure. Their uneducated politicalpower is dangerous, and their uneducated leisure is degrad-ing and will be dangerous. If the people are incapable ofachieving the education that responsible democratic citizen-ship demands, then democracy is doomed, Aristotle rightlycondemned the mass of mankind to natural slavery, and thesooner we set about reversing the trend toward democracythe better it will be for the world.

      This is an extreme statement which bundles together a lot without direct evidence.

      Written in an era in which there was a lot of pro-Democracy and anti-Communist discussion, Hutchins is making an almost religious statement here which binds education and democracy in the ways in which the Catholic church bound education and religion in scholasticism. While scholasticism may have had benefits, it also caused a variety of ills which took centuries to unwind into the Enlightenment.

      Why can't we separate education from democracy? Can't education of this sort live in other polities? Hasn't it? Does critical education necessarily lead to democracy?

      What does the explorable solution space of admixtures of critical reasoning and education look like with respect to various forms of government? Could a well-educated population thrive under collectivism or socialism?

      The definition of "natural slavery" here is contingent and requires lots of context, particularly of the ways in which Aristotle used it versus our current understanding of chattel slavery.

  3. Apr 2023
    1. Information Creation as a Process

      Information (or knowledge) creation is a *continuous* process. Scientific publication could (maybe should) be continuously be updated as presented in the following book chapter:

      HELLER, Lambert, THE, Ronald and BARTLING, Sönke, 2014. Dynamic Publication Formats and Collaborative Authoring. In: BARTLING, Sönke and FRIESIKE, Sascha (eds.), Opening Science. Online. Springer International Publishing. pp. 191–211. [Accessed 11 January 2014]. ISBN 978-3-319-00025-1. Retrieved from: http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-00026-8_13

    1. Recommended Resource:

      I recommend adding this doctoral research article on developing open education practices (OEP) in British Columbia, Canada. The scholarly article is released by Open University, a U.K. higher education institution that promotes open education.

      Paskevicius, M. & Irvine, V. (2019). Open Education and Learning Design: Open Pedagogy in Praxis. Open University, 2019(1). DOI: 10.5334/jime.51

      A relevant excerpt from the article reveals the study results that show OEP enhances student learning:

      "Furthermore, participants reflected on how inviting learners to work in the open increased the level of risk and/or potential reward and thereby motivated greater investment in the work. This was articulated by Patricia who suggested “the stakes might feel higher when someone is creating something that’s going to be open and accessible by a wider community” as well as Alice who stated “students will write differently, you know, if they know it’s not just going to their professor.” The practice of encouraging learners to share their work was perceived by Olivia to “add more value to their work,” by showing learners the work they do at university can “have an audience beyond their professors.”"

    1. Oakeshott saw educationas part of the ‘conversation of mankind’, wherein teachers induct their studentsinto that conversation by teaching them how to participate in the dialogue—howto hear the ‘voices’ of previous generations while cultivating their own uniquevoices.

      How did Michael Oakeshott's philosophy overlap with the idea of the 'Great Conversation' or 20th century movement of Adler's Great Books of the Western World.

      How does it influence the idea of "having conversations with the text" in the annotation space?

  4. Mar 2023
    1. For open educators, this runs counter to the very reason we use OER in the first place. Many open educators choose OER because there are legal permissions that allow for the ethical reuse of other people’s material — material the creators have generously and freely made available through the application of open licenses to it. The thought of using work that has not been freely gifted to the commons by the creator feels wrong for many open educators and is antithetical to the generosity inherent in the OER community.
  5. Jan 2023
    1. It was Eric Williams (Capitalism and Slavery) who first developed the idea thatEuropean slave plantations in the New World were, in effect, the first factories; theidea of a “pre-racial” North Atlantic proletariat, in which these same techniques ofmechanization, surveillance, and discipline were applied to workers on ships, waselaborated by Peter Linebaugh and Marcus Rediker (The Many-Headed Hydra).

      What sort of influence did these sorts of philosophy have on educational practices of their day and how do they reflect on our current educational milieu?

  6. Dec 2022
    1. FOSSDLE Commons (new OER Foundation project) https://social.fossdle.org/ 4 OERu https://mastodon.oeru.org/ 6 Open EdTech https://openedtech.social/ 8 Fossodon (open source) https://fosstodon.org/ 1 Wikis World (wiki enthusiasts) https://wikis.world 1
  7. Nov 2022
    1. Donations

      To add some other intermediary services:

      To add a service for groups:

      To add a service that enables fans to support the creators directly and anonymously via microdonations or small donations by pre-charging their Coil account to spend on content streaming or tipping the creators' wallets via a layer containing JS script following the Interledger Protocol proposed to W3C:

      If you want to know more, head to Web Monetization or Community or Explainer

      Disclaimer: I am a recipient of a grant from the Interledger Foundation, so there would be a Conflict of Interest if I edited directly. Plus, sharing on Hypothesis allows other users to chime in.

  8. Oct 2022
    1. Émile flew offthe shelves in 18th-century Paris. In fact, booksellers found it more profitable torent it out by the hour than to sell it. Ultimately the excitement got too much forthe authorities and Émile was banned in Paris and burned in Geneva

      Émile: or On Education was so popular that it was rented out by the hour for additional profit instead of being sold outright. [summary]


      When did book rental in education spaces become a business model? What has it looked like historically?

    2. Rousseau’sheretical view was that anything which was outside children’s experience wouldbe meaningless to them, much as Plato, Comenius, and others had warned. Hisinsights had condensed principally out of the prevailing intellectual atmosphereat the time—empiricism, explicated by philosophers such as John Locke. We’lllook at Locke and Rousseau in more detail in Chapter 2.

      Just as the ideas of liberty and freedom were gifted to us by Indigenous North Americans as is shown by Graeber and Wengrow in The Dawn of Everything, is it possible that the same sorts of ideas but within the educational sphere were being transmitted by Indigenous intellectuals to Europe in the same way? Is Rousseau's 18th century book Emile, or On Education of this sort?

      What other sorts of philosophies invaded Western thought at this time?

    1. The Activity and Art of Reading 15 If you ask a living teacher a question, he will probably answer you. If you are puzzled by what he says, you can save yourself the trouble of thinking by asking him what he means. If, however, you ask a book a question, you must answer it yourself.

      What effect might this have on the learning process of purely oral cultures?

  9. Jul 2022
    1. During the seventeenth century, this associative view vanished and was replaced by more literallydescriptive views simply of the thing as it exists in itself.

      The associative emblematic worldview prevalent prior to the seventeenth century began to disappear within Western culture as the rise of the early modern period and the beginning of the scientific revolution began to focus on more descriptive modes of thought and representation.


      Have any researchers done specific work on this shift from emblematic to the descriptive? What examples do they show which support this shift? Any particular heavy influences?

      This section cites:<br /> William B. Ashworth, Jr. “Natural History and the Emblematic World View,” in Reappraisals of the Scientific Revolution, David C. Lindberg and Robert S. Westfall, eds #books/wanttoread<br /> which could be a place to start.


      Note that this same shift from associative and emblematic to descriptive and pedantic coincides not only with the rise of the scientific revolution but also with the effects of rising information overload in a post-Gutenberg world as well as the education reforms of Ramus (late 1500s) et al. as well as the beginning of the move away from scholasticism.


      Is there any evidence to support claims that this worldview stemmed from pagan traditions and cultures and not solely the art of memory traditions from ancient Greece? Could it have been pagan traditions which held onto these and they were supplemented and reinforced by ecclesiastical forces which used the Greek traditions?


      Examples of emblematic worldview: - particular colors of flowers meant specific things (red = love, yellow = friendship, etc.) We still have these or remants - Saints had their associative animals and objects - anniversary gifts had associative meanings (paper, silver, gold, etc.) We still have remnants of these things, though most are associated with wealth (gold, silver, platinum anniversaries). When did this tradition actually start? - what were the associative meanings of rabbits, turtles, and other animals which appear frequently in manuscript marginalia? (We have the example of the bee (Latin: apes) which where frequently used this way as being associated with the idea of imitation.) - other broad categories?

  10. May 2022
    1. Projects like the Open Journal System, Manifold or Scalar are based on a distributed model that allow anyone to download and deploy the software (Maxwell et al., 2019), offering an alternative to the commercial entities that dominate the scholarly communication ecosystem.

      Might Hypothes.is also be included with this list? Though it could go a bit further toward packaging and making it more easily available to self-hosters.

  11. Feb 2022
    1. The moment we stop making plans is the moment we start to learn.

      No evidence for this statement, but does bring up some good questions:

      When does learning start?

      What does the process look like?

      What are the ingredients or building blocks?

      How do we define learning?

      How do we better encourage learning

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  12. Dec 2021
  13. Oct 2021
  14. Jun 2021
    1. Ong puts it this way:“Ramus can adopt memory intodialectic because his entire topically conceived logic is itself a system of local memory”(Ramus280).However, it is a simplified systemunlike the classical one: The ancient precepts about images and theirfacilitation of invention have been dropped.

      What is gained and lost in the Ramist tradition versus the method of loci?

      There is some simplicity to be sure and structure/organization aid in the structured memory.

      We lose the addition work, creativity, and invention. We also loose some of the interest that students might have. I recently read something to the effect that we always seem to make education boring and dull. (cross reference this, which I haven't read: https://daily.jstor.org/why-school-is-boring/)

      How does this interact with Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's idea of flow? Does Ramism beat out the fun of flow?

      How also, is this similar to Kelly's idea of the third archive as a means of bringing these all back together?

  15. Apr 2021
    1. Rajiv reminded us that: “Openness can be leveraged for justice, but it can also do harm. Closed practices can also do harm, but there are times when closed is the empowered choice. Choice is key. We must serve justice, rather than merely being open.”
  16. Mar 2021
    1. I hadn't really thought that much about the pedagogical aspects (they don't really teach PhD historians pedagogy where I went to school, or I missed it somehow, so I've been trying to educate myself since then).

      Don't feel bad, I don't think many (any?!) programs do this. It's a terrible disservice to academia.

      Examples of programs that do this would be fantastic to have. Or even an Open Education based course that covers some of this would be an awesome thing to see.

  17. Aug 2020
  18. Jun 2020
  19. Dec 2019
    1. 3 sets of foundational values of open pedagogy, namely:  autonomy and interdependence; freedom and responsibility; democracy and participation.

      compare to Downes' MOOC design principles. Autonomy - diversity - openness - interactivity

  20. Nov 2019
    1. As educational technologies, instructional design and online learning/content delivery platforms keep evolving, more learners with more needs and motives will be drawn to taking online courses – a growing demand that in turn will spur further improvements in technology and delivery.

      Educational Technology offers free articles with sources.

      Rating: 5/10

  21. Sep 2019
    1. Notably, several of the catalysts identified by participants were not directly related to an awareness of OER or open textbooks. Several of these catalysts are related to innovation, learner empowerment, and increasing access to knowledge more generally. While these individuals identified as open education practitioners, they did not necessarily cite OER as their starting point for integrating openness in teaching and learning.

      This is an interesting conclusion as it has oft been stated that OER are a gateway to OEP. While that appears to be the case for 3 of the participants, for the rest it appears that OER was not the starting point to OEP. What bears deeper investigation is whether the second or third step to OEP was OER. Reminds me of a blog post I wrote a few years back wondering if OEP required OER http://clintlalonde.net/2017/02/04/does-open-pedagogy-require-oer/

    2. Thomas further commented “it’s openness in what we bring into the classroom, openness in what we take out of the classroom, and an openness between what happens between the students and myself and the students and each other in how we organise the classroom.”

      Great quote

    3. Alice noted her feeling that the use and sharing of OER were one of the “less threatening” components of OEP.

      This is an important change in perception that has occurred in the past 10-15 years of OER. OER's used to be met with much skepticism by faculty. It is nice to see that these are now becoming "less threatening" and, by extension, more accessible.

    4. “students will write differently, you know, if they know it’s not just going to their professor.

      Changes the audience and gets students to think about writing for a larger, perhaps more general audience. This is an important aspect if we want to have, say, highly technical disciplines, like sciences, learning to engage more broadly with the public. Having learners understand the importance of writing for an audience that is more general could become an important open pedagogy principle for disciplines that want to have their work have a broader impact with the general public.

  22. May 2019
    1. how would our education system change to take advantage of this new external symbol-manipulation capability of students and teachers (and administrators)?

      Let's say it's been twenty years since PDAs have been widely available. I returned to higher education less than ten years ago. K-12 seems to have embraced learning technologies, and their affordances, to improve primary and secondary education. In my experience, few educators with terminal degrees have made the effort while younger and more precarious teachers are slowly adopting educational technologies. Administrators are leading the way with their digital management systems and students are using proprietary social media platforms. Our institutions are doing what they were designed to do: resist change and reproduce the social order. Research paid for with public monies is as quickly privatized as that produced in corporations. Open education practices are just beginning to be explored.

      The first PDA, the Organizer, was released in 1984 by Psion, followed by Psion's Series 3, in 1991. The latter began to resemble the more familiar PDA style, including a full keyboard.[4][5] The term PDA was first used on January 7, 1992 by Apple Computer CEO John Sculley at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, referring to the Apple Newton.[6] In 1994, IBM introduced the first PDA with full telephone functionality, the IBM Simon, which can also be considered the first smartphone. Then in 1996, Nokia introduced a PDA with telephone functionality, the 9000 Communicator, which became the world's best-selling PDA. Another early entrant in this market was Palm, with a line of PDA products which began in March 1996. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_digital_assistant

  23. Dec 2018
    1. Today, I had the privilege of speaking on a panel at the Comparative and International Education Society’s Annual Conference with representatives of two open education projects that depend on Creative Commons licenses to do their work. One is the OER publisher Siyavula, based in Cape Town, South Africa. Among other things, they publish textbooks for use in primary and secondary school in math and science. After high school students in the country protested about the conditions of their education – singling out textbook prices as a barrier to their learning – the South African government relied on the Creative Commons license used by Siyavula to print and distribute 10 million Siyavula textbooks to school children, some of whom had never had their own textbook before. The other are the related teacher education projects, TESSA, and TESS-India, which use the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike license on teacher training materials. Created first in English, the projects and their teachers rely on the reuse rights granted by the Creative Commons license to translate and localize these training materials to make them authentic for teachers in the linguistically and culturally diverse settings of sub-Saharan Africa and India. (Both projects are linked to and supported by the Open University in the UK, http://www.open.ac.uk/, which uses Creative Commons-licensed materials as well.) If one wakes up hoping to feel that one’s work in the world is useful, then an experience like this makes it a good day.

      I think contextualizing Creative Commons material as a component in global justice and thinking of fair distribution of resources and knowledge as an antidote to imperialism is a provocative concept.This blog, infojusticeorg offers perspectives on social justice and Creative Commons by many authors.

  24. Nov 2018
    1. OER matters not because textbooks matter. OER matters because it highlights an example of how something central to our public missions, the transfer of our foundational disciplinary knowledge from one generation of scholars to the next, has been co-opted by private profit. And OER is not a solution, but a systemic shift from private to public architecture in how we deliver learning.

      I love this framing of OER as public infrastructure to facilitate the transfer of knowledge. I think it is not only generational, but also more broadly to the public. OER use is not limited to just students within our institutions, but are available freely and openly more broadly to the public. To anyone. I think we need to make that point more widely known. Every OER that is made freely available is making knowledge more open to not only students in our institutions, but to anyone, anywhere. It truly is "public" infrastructure.

  25. Oct 2018
    1. For students to work in the open, everything they use has to be original content, openly licensed, or in the public domain

      have to disagree here. Students can link, quote, summarize, paraphrase, and thus build or contribute to open resources from closed information

  26. Jul 2018
    1. for empowering them

      This is a key point - the opportunity to do something with content, to create content, has a real and lasting value beyond the content itself. We want students to recognize that they are in charge of their learning, they have control and can take initiative. There's nothing empowering about jumping through hoops of absorbing content, taking tests and following rubrics.

  27. Jun 2018
  28. May 2018
  29. Apr 2018
  30. www.openpraxis.org www.openpraxis.org
    8
    2
    1. The eight distinct sub-topics within open education over the past four decades were identified as open access, OER, MOOCs, open educational practice, social media, e-learning, open education in schools and distance learning.

      What I notice is missing from here is open pedagogy which, as Tannis Morgan noted, has historical roots in the late 70's in Quebec. However, it may be that because this is a historical look at open education, and open pedagogy is a relatively recent (despite the work Tannis has discovered) area of interest for open educators, there may just be a lack of formalized research supporting the idea of open pedagogy.

    2. Open education does not constitute a discipline, in the manner of a hard science for example, so there is no agreed canon of research that all researchers will be familiar with. It is also an area that practitioners tend to move into from other fields, often because of an interest in applying aspects of openness to their foundational discipline. This can be seen as an advantage, in that different perspectives are brought into the domain, and it evolves rapidly. However, it also results in an absence of shared knowledge, with the consequence that existing knowledge is often ‘rediscovered’ or not built upon.

      In order for open education to be more than a movement, it feels like we should be consciously moving in this direction - to define a canonical set of resources that are foundational to the field in order to help orient others and further define ourselves as a field/discipline. Because, as we have seen with MOOC's, if we do not do it, then others will do it for us.

  31. Mar 2018
  32. Dec 2017
  33. Nov 2017
    1. An institution has implemented a learning management system (LMS). The LMS contains a learning object repository (LOR) that in some aspects is populated by all users across the world  who use the same LMS.  Each user is able to align his/her learning objects to the academic standards appropriate to that jurisdiction. Using CASE 1.0, the LMS is able to present the same learning objects to users in other jurisdictions while displaying the academic standards alignment for the other jurisdictions (associations).

      Sounds like part of the problem Vitrine technologie-éducation has been tackling with Ceres, a Learning Object Repository with a Semantic core.

  34. Jun 2017
  35. Apr 2017
    1. I think the locking down of open is dangerous. I think it draws lines where they need not be, and it reconsolidates power for those who define it. More than that, the power around open has been pretty focused on a few people for too long, and I count myself amongst them.

      amen.

    1. Informal and open education has been largely overlooked, probably due to social and cultural stigmas attached to learning from places besides traditional campuses. Our education system ends where autodidactism (self-learning) commences: we are content with spoon-feeding our students from textbooks, with no focus on extensive learning. Students learn from topics, as opposed to problems (problem-based learning). It cannot be emphasised enough that research stems from problem-solving buttressed by necessary instruction.

    2. difines education dually, as the process of giving and receiving systematic instruction (education) and as an enlightening experience (‘an’ education). Enlightening-giving greater understanding.

  36. Mar 2017
  37. www.openbookpublishers.com www.openbookpublishers.com
    1. What Does It Mean to Open Education? Perspectives on Using Open Educational Resources at a US Public University1
  38. Feb 2017
    1. the goal posts must be placed further than simply cheaper textbooks.

      Yes. Because publishers will always be able to beat OER on price as they mine new business models. Not hard to image where the content becomes the loss leader for the publishers in order to get faculty buy-in into tools that have the real gold - data.

    1. Using peer assessment for improving student work Involving students in self-assessment of their work and classroom performanc

      These are new example of open pedagogy for me.

  39. Nov 2016
    1. "Wikity is social bookmarks, wikified." -- Mike Caulfield<br> http://rainystreets.wikity.cc/<br> https://github.com/michaelarthurcaulfield/wikity-zero/

      as far as I can tell, Wikity is the simplest way to run a personal wiki on top of WordPress. But the focus is a hyperlinked bookmarking and notetaking system, because after a year of use and 2,000 cards logged, I can tell you that is where the unique value is.

    1. From the privacy – and primacy – of LMS (specifically Canvas) discussion forums to the public “playground” afforded by Hypothesis; From the formality of pre-determined questions (which can privilege the scope and purpose of reading) to open-ended and less formal (re)action and exchange; and From an instructor’s authority to center and control textual discourse to a de-centering of power through a fracturing of attention, interest, and commitment.

      So this first one is a technical distinction whereas the second and third are more pedagogical. But what occurred to me in reading this list of rationales was the way in which those pedagogical choices are effected by the tech we choose.

  40. Oct 2016
  41. Sep 2016
    1. curate

      The term may still sound somewhat misleading to those who work in, say, museums (where “curator” is a very specific job title). But the notion behind it is quite important, especially when it comes to Open Education. A big part of the job is to find resources and bring them together for further reuse, remix, and reappropriation. In French, we often talk about «veille technologique», which is basically about watching/monitoring relevant resources, especially online.

    2. Where would you start?
  42. Jul 2016
    1. There is still much more emphasis in hyperbolic education discourse on pushing content rather than enabling connections between people

      There is. But it might be shifting a bit. Or, at least, there are people around who are proposing another Sphere of Agency, one which relies much less on content and does a lot more with openness. As with Berkana, our job might be to connect these people who sing in a different voice. We might reach richer harmonies when we don’t expect unison.

    2. a handful in a few major world languages

      One might think that those other languages are well-represented. People connected with the Open Knowledge Foundation are currently tackling this very issue. Here, Open Education isn’t just about content.

    1. Colleges using data analytics have to make sure their students have “open futures” — that their programs create educational opportunities, not the other way around.

      Another side to Open Education: open opportunities. While they still mean “opportunities for success in the current system”, it’s compatible with a view of student success which goes beyond the current system.

    1. disheartened that open education is still mainly focused on MOOCs and OERs, rather than on the broader concept of open textbooks, open research, and open data.

      We often think of the hype cycle but two things this post reveals about MOOC hype: 1) There can be regional differences in the timing of those cycles. 2) We might be in a broad shift from MOOC as a thing to MOOC as a pretext for openness.

    1. “Students chose how they were going to display how they were going to master those standards through projects,”

      A big part of both Competency-Based Education and the open-ended side of Open Education.

  43. Jun 2016
    1. We need to enable and facilitate alternative development models if our vision of universal OER adoption is to become a reality.
  44. www.networkedlearningconference.org.uk www.networkedlearningconference.org.uk
    1. While the open educationfieldtends to focus onthe development and scalability ofeducational resources and practices, networked learningtends to emphasizethe pedagogical experience of learning communities and interpersonal connections, and connected learning promotes instructional designs for holistic, participatorylearning.

      three definitions

    1. who are the gatekeepers in deciding what that looks like.

      perhaps a transformation is necessary here. To many (too many), education means grades and scores and standardization. Capacity for self-directed learning is more important and difficult to quantify.

    2. it can mean that students see themselves as actively building their learning

      This is the heart of the open ed/info lit connection. If the perception is that students go to school to be taught, the more important goal of learning how to learn is so much more difficult to achieve. But fostering lifelong learning means ceding some control over what is to be learned to the learner.

    3. does “open” actually transform the way in which we do “school,” the way in which we teach and learn?

      I think it can, but does higher ed want it to? Does anyone other than the open evangelists? The attempts at transformation in the 70s failed pretty hard. Maybe we need to transform teh public vision of what education looks like.

    4. Free? Open access? Open enrollment? Open data? Openly-licensed materials, as in open educational resources or open source software? Open for discussion? Open for debate? Open to competition? Open for business? Open-ended intellectual exploration?

      love the extended list, esp. "open for discussion/debate" Most definitions don't get past "free." "Open to competition" is an interesting thought. Open to cooperation would be more ideal. What would the competition be? For-profits?

    1. Look for existing networks for collaboration that could be adapted to fit the strategy if formal networks are desired.

      Work with OpenStax here on grant application? Could we somehow piggy back on their relationship with Hewlett and build for them their annotation solution--most recently articulated as requiring better teacher-student communication?

    2. ANCHOR INSTITUTIONS

      Name names...

    3. OER must have the right metadata

      Could h provide that metadata?!

    4. SUPPORTING ROBUST TECHNICAL and INSTITUTIONAL INFRASTRUCTURE

      Possibly where h fits in...

    5. the Foundation will provide enhanced support for grantee collaboration.

      We're already working with grantees: OpenStax, Lumen, Rebus.

      Perhaps the OpenStax collaboration could get funding to enhance 1:1 communication within textbooks.

    6. the technical basis for OER
    7. robust and flexible infrastructure.

      In so far as collaborative annotation might be critical to a broader OER infrastructure, then perhaps it does contribute to scale.

    8. Moreover, ZTC degrees ensure that the benefits of open materials follow students from enrollment to graduation, allowing for a pathway of personalized courses that guide students toward completing their degrees.

      What infrastructure would hold this together, especially if textbooks are remixed and mashed up by both students and teachers. Perhaps an annotation system?

    9. Open materials can empower faculty with the aca-demic freedom to tailor their courses to their students’ needs and even engage students in meaningful learning experiences through adaptation and improvement of the open content itself.10

      HUGE, especially the part about "meaningful learning experiences."

      This is something Kathi Fletcher (OpenStax) alluded to in the edu board meeting: using h to provide a line of communication between students and teachers.

    10. reserve part of its portfolio to con-tinue funding the infrastructure necessary to support the field

      This is at least part of h's play IMO. Annotation should be part of this infrastructure, not only for post-publication discussion but for production and discovery of such resources as well.

    11. Therefore, we refreshed our OER strategy to focus on our goal of using grants to help OER reach mainstream adoption.

      This stage of funding is focused on scale.

    12. high-quality academic materials

      Are tools "materials"?

    1. I hired a bunch of undergrad students and recent alums, and paid them out of my own pocket to assist me.

      I did not know this. And I already thought Robin was a bad-ass. There should be national, philanthropic funding for projects like this.

    1. and any other tools, materials, or techniques used to support access to knowledge.

      Tools are OERs.

    2. and refreshed OER strategy.

      This "refresh" was done December 2015.

    3. The infrastructure

      Hmm, I wonder if this is thinking inspired by the NGDLE movement (from Gates, EDUCAUSE)?

    4. Develop innovative OER models

      I suppose that would be us.

    1. the frustration faculty members sometimes feel when searching for open content to include in their courses.

      Annotation could help with this discovery, evaluation, and remixing process.

    2. thinking more broadly about what ‘open’ means and how open connects to a variety of different areas

      Yes!

    3. Scaling Up OER
    1. If the limitations are acknowledged and accounted for, there is no reason why open education should not offer genuine opportunities for promoting equity of access to higher education