11 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2022
    1. Test ways to build earned credentials (certificates, badges, coursework) into degrees; build banks of experience (on-the-job training, internships) that earn credit; admit students simultaneously to two- and four-year institutions; guarantee transfer agreements so students don’t take numerous courses that don’t transfer into a four-year degree; set goals for meaningful employment upon graduation; and work collectively to measure our progress and hold ourselves accountable for the outcome.
  2. Jun 2022
  3. Jan 2022
    1. The Google Career Certificates Employer Consortium consists of over 150 U.S. companies like Deloitte, Infosys, Snap Inc., Target, Verizon, and of course, Google. These companies span multiple sectors and are committed to considering Google Career Certificate graduates for entry-level jobs. Upon completion of a Google Career Certificate, you will gain access to an exclusive job platform where you can easily apply to opportunities from employers with open jobs. https://grow.google/certificates/it-support/#?modal_active=none

      The consortium consists of 150 companies in December, 2021. This will increase. Significant community college reaction is (wisely?) sensing an opportunity instead of a threat. They are collaborating and indications are they will benefit across multiple verticals. I'm excited to see how this plays out in 4-year spaces of Higher Ed:

      • Will HE react to a threat or an opportunity?
      • How might domains like interpersonal and intercultural skills be credentialed in a way that fosters an interoperable ecosystem between HE and industry efforts like this?
      • How will HE endeavor to consume credentials issued by non-accredited bodies?
  4. Dec 2021
  5. Mar 2021
    1. But how reliable are micro-credentials as indicators of student learning? How should micro-credentials be interpreted as indicators of academic potential?

      Interesting distinction between student learning and potential especially in an academic setting.

    1. Joined-up thinking, and the importance of digital literacy to active citizenship. The need for active citizenship (requiring equity of access to learning) to be a goal, to create a "more effective and equitable lifelong learning ecosystem."

  6. Mar 2019
    1. U.S. Through these stories from and discussions with our Beacons and partners, we offer educators and developers specific examples of how to incorporate technology into adult learning in highly effective yet affordable ways

      Digital promise is an organization that connects adult learners with methods to implement technology in useful ways to improve education. The website hosts a network of educators and the programs they offer to improve basic math and literacy skills in U.S. adults to help with job training and career advancement. There is also a mico-credentialing program they extend to training programs that endorse those that have learned or gained specific skills. Rating 5/10

  7. Nov 2017
    1. The IMS Global Competencies and Academic Standards Exchange™ specification (CASE)™ is used to exchange information about learning and education competencies. CASE also transmits information about rubrics, criteria for performance tasks, which may or may not be aligned to competencies.

      Interesting that they explicitly talk about tasks which may not be aligned to competencies. Leaves room for co-curricular activities and microcredentials.

  8. Oct 2017
    1. If students do not complete the courses they need to graduate, they can’t progress.

      The #retention perspective in Learning Analytics: learners succeed by completing courses. Can we think of learning success in other ways? Maybe through other forms of recognition than passing grades?

  9. Jul 2017