19 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2018
  2. Jul 2018
  3. Sep 2017
    1. Badging may be seen as an alternative to traditional forms of educational assessment and recognition. Traditional systems for recognizing learning – letter grades, transcripts, or even diplomas– may not be able to fully demonstrate students’ actual learning or achievements. Digital badging would allow metadata to be attached to each badge, bringing together valuable information about the criteria for earning the badge, the institution or instructor behind the badge, the date the badge was earned, descriptions or copies of assessment tools, or even examples of actual work submitted to receive the badge. [4] Additionally, as a form of micro-credentialing, badging would help document specific learning achievement along a larger path towards general achievement.

      This is a good idea for large, multi-site libraries. Staff have trouble leaving the branch for training, and have no incentive to increase their skills. Badges would be a tangible result, which (ideally) would accrue over time to illustrate an upward trend in skill development. An extrinsic motivator, true, but also a record of effort and time expended.

  4. Jul 2017
  5. May 2017
    1. Ian O’Byrne, an assistant professor of literacy education at the College of Charleston, replied, “In the future we’ll see more opportunities for online, personalized learning. This will include open, online learning experiences (e.g., MOOCs) where individuals can lurk and build up capacity or quench interests. I also believe that we’ll see a rise in the offering of premium or pay content that creates a space where one-to-one learning and interaction will allow mentors to guide learners while providing critical feedback. We will identify opportunities to build a digital version of the apprenticeship learning models that have existed in the past. Alternative credentials and digital badges will provide more granular opportunities to document and archive learning over time from traditional and nontraditional learning sources. Through evolving technologies (e.g., blockchain), this may provide opportunities for learners to document and frame their own learning pathways.”
  6. Apr 2017
  7. Jan 2017
    1. aspirations

      What's good for the goose... We expect teachers to help students articulate and plan for achieving their dreams. Intrigued by their approach to using Badges to help do the same for teachers

  8. Aug 2016
    1. ever-growing

      Not all types of blockchains, or more exactly not all types of technologies providing services similar to blockchains have to have an ever-growing database. It is the Bitcoin model and other models are possible (for the agnostic!). Let's call them the "unblocked chains" e.g. Swirlds

    2. many visions for blockchain in education seem to advocate writing it all to the blockchain

      This is obviously a mistake as it is sufficient to put the address (or its hash value) on the chain, the data (of any size) being stored on something like IPFS. Blockchains were initially designed to store transactions not content — the discussion about the size of the block was about the number of transactions that could go in a block... Things evolved with new systems like https://www.bigchaindb.com/ and the landscape of blockchain-like technologies will continue to grow and diversify...

  9. Jun 2016
    1. This post is the third in a series of five blog posts designed to explore, inform, and encourage public discussions about the possibilities, opportunities, and challenges arising at the intersection of Open Badges and blockchain technology.
    1. Over the past year, we have been working on a set of tools to issue, display, and verify digital credentials using the Bitcoin blockchain and the Mozilla Open Badges specification. Today we are releasing version 1 of our code under the MIT open-source license to make it easier for others to start experimenting with similar ideas.
  10. May 2016
  11. Dec 2015
  12. Mar 2015
    1. Yet, these are not certain, and the future of the ecosystem as I hope to shape it depends upon a growing core of influencers who are genuinely committed to and uncompromising about the value of the commons.

      Lets expand this beyond badges and commit to an protecting an open web.

    2. democratizing technology and authoritarian technology.

      I wonder how tool is separated from technology. Is technology different from a tool or is every tool a new technology? And i f we mean that is the case does that mean every tool we have ever touched either has a democratizing technology or an authoritarian technology?

      And if is every tool we have touched is the tendency in the tool or is us?

    3. There are inherent affordances and limitations to the technology that make some things possible and other things more likely. At the same time, there are complex individual and societal forces that impact how it develops, especially the power structures that develop alongside a given technology.

      getting at the definition of technology.

    4. but they are instead examining how it developed in a give context.

      Reaffirming a tool is used is defined by affordances, agent, and context.

    5. We saw this happen with Microsoft. It started out with a big vision: How do we get a PC on every desk and in every home? It was profoundly democratizing.

      This is not true. Closed and proprietary was baked into microsofts DNA since Day.

      Though Microsoft today proves Bull's thesis. As they have become a loser, or less of a winner they have started to shake things up. Windows 10 maybe kinda free. Office Apps everywhere.