31 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2018
  2. Nov 2017
    1. if cross-format identifiers like DOIs are used, annotations made in one format (eg, EPUB) can be seen in the same document published in other formats (eg, HTML, PDF) and in other locations.

      Whaa..? This sounds seriously hard. But remarkably clever.

  3. Sep 2017
    1. Call for Papers: Special Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) edition

      Here I have highlighted the title of the Compass Journal. I can add my notes here and also links like this to the Clipper Blog. I can also insert images like this

  4. May 2017
    1. Closing comments because you don’t want to engage in conversations?

      I wonder if she would close comments on her site if all were constructive? From my read, it wasn't that she didn't want to engage in conversation.

  5. Feb 2017
    1. we are diving back into annotation

      Another big thank you! As I've mentioned on Twitter, your course's "re/turn" to a previous Marginal Syllabus conversation (from October) is what Joe, Jeremy, and I hoped would happen over time - that educators would find conversations and texts that resonate with their interests and courses, and then join the text-based conversation via ongoing annotation. This turns the text-as-conversation into an open educational resource (OER), and - like you - we hope other educators and courses revisit these conversations to support their own learning.

    2. a significant jump-start to that sense of belonging to a community, both within the course and beyond it.

      I've had students say similar things about using Hypothesis to read together. I'd like to explore the relationship between open/collaborative web annotation and community-building... many questions to consider...

    3. their reflections that week posted to their own blogs were filled with connections they made between Dewey’s work, John Seely Brown’s, and the research report/agenda for Connected Learning

      Awesome. Is it possible to connect with some of these posts and perspectives?

    4. scaffolding between the texts and supportive approaches

      This is important, and in my teaching I've been careful to include web annotation in both private (group) and public modes so that learners find comfort with different approaches and can come to appreciate some of the scaffolding that you describe.

    5. Amazing

      You're very welcome, and we're appreciative of your willingness to merge formal course activities with the more open-ended and interest-driven approach to educator learning via Marginal Syllabus.

    6. to highlight things they noticed and that raised questions for them

      A publicly visible and annotated syllabus is a great practice, and something I'll incorporate into courses - great idea!

    7. about the power of annotation

      This is quickly going to become a bit meta... :)

  6. Dec 2016
  7. Aug 2016
  8. maurice1979-blog.tumblr.com maurice1979-blog.tumblr.com
    1. Hi there, I am using this open source tool to promote open science by make open annotations directly on the was as a platform for collaboration. You also can jot down your comments in the context where it belongs.

  9. Jun 2016
  10. Apr 2016
  11. Mar 2016
    1. open annotation.

      I'd like to hear discussion around the term "open" here. How exactly are you using it @remiholden? To mean public as opposed to private?

      For me, open has specific infrastructural connotations: it's about a variety of annotation clients like hypothes.is conforming to certain wider standards so that web annotation--like the web itself--is an interoperable system.

      But I'm curious the degree to which that matters to teachers and learners. And why? We're using hypothes.is, which promises to conform to standards being developed by the w3c, but could DIIGO do the trick even though they're system (for now) is closed?

  12. Jan 2016
    1. It will only happen if we fix our politics. A better politics doesn’t mean we have to agree on everything.  This is a big country, with different regions and attitudes and interests.  That’s one of our strengths, too.  Our Founders distributed power between states and branches of government, and expected us to argue, just as they did, over the size and shape of government, over commerce and foreign relations, over the meaning of liberty and the imperatives of security.

      While technology doesn't solve everything, I firmly believe it has a critical role to play in fixing our politics. Better and easier ways for citizens to hold their government accountable, engage with their elected officials and each other, and way more exist. We're using one right now.

    2. That’s how we forged a Trans-Pacific Partnership to open markets, protect workers and the environment, and advance American leadership in Asia.  It cuts 18,000 taxes on products Made in America, and supports more good jobs.  With TPP, China doesn’t set the rules in that region, we do.  You want to show our strength in this century?  Approve this agreement.  Give us the tools to enforce it. 

      An opportunity to employ online, open co-creation tools. Such as, say, Hypothes.is. Or what the D.C.'s Mayor Bowser and city council are doing with the Madison online policymaking software.

      Back when this was still being negotiated in secret, a leaked chapter of TPP was opened on the very first version of Madison. What could've been as far as harnessing open online annotation for transparent, smarter policy outcomes.

  13. Dec 2015
    1. Anyone can say Anything

      The “Open World Assumption” is central to this post and to the actual shift in paradigm when it comes to moving from documents to data. People/institutions have an alleged interest in protecting the way their assets are described. Even libraries. The Open World Assumption makes it sound quite chaotic, to some ears. And claims that machine learning will solve everything tend not to help the unconvinced too much. Something to note is that this ability to say something about a third party’s resource connects really well with Web annotations (which do more than “add metadata” to those resources) and with the fact that no-cost access to some item of content isn’t the end of the openness.

  14. Aug 2015
  15. Dec 2014
  16. Nov 2014
    1. Ich vermute sehr, dass offenes Annotieren im Web eine zentrale digitale Kommunikationsform der näheren Zukunft wird.

      Dies gilt jedenfalls, wenn Annotationstools so einfach und intuitiv gestaltet sind wie dieser Annotator.