37 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
  2. Feb 2019
    1. However, a healthy news ecosystem doesn’t just require a thriving free press, it also needs a diversity of curators, newsletters and content discovery options that enable the weird and wonderful to surface. We want to use Nuzzel as a test kitchen to see what models works for curators as well as content creators. The simple goal is a sustainable open web where the goals of creators, curators and consumers are aligned around the best possible experience.

      This sounds exciting to me and could dovetail with efforts of many with respect to IndieWeb for Journalism.

  3. Mar 2018
    1. With AMP Stories, which is now in beta, publishers can combine the speed of AMP with the rich, immersive storytelling of the open web.

      "With AMP Stories, which is now in beta, publishers can combine the speed of AMP with the rich, immersive storytelling of the open web."

      Is this sentence's structure explicitly saying that AMP is not "open web"?!

    1. avoid digital redlining,[26] creating inequities (however unintentionally) through the use of technology.

      So many challenges here, and we really must address all of them. I'm also interested in learning how to make sure my websites and other affordances I use are accessible to people with disabilities.

  4. Nov 2017
    1. An institution has implemented a learning management system (LMS). The LMS contains a learning object repository (LOR) that in some aspects is populated by all users across the world  who use the same LMS.  Each user is able to align his/her learning objects to the academic standards appropriate to that jurisdiction. Using CASE 1.0, the LMS is able to present the same learning objects to users in other jurisdictions while displaying the academic standards alignment for the other jurisdictions (associations).

      Sounds like part of the problem Vitrine technologie-éducation has been tackling with Ceres, a Learning Object Repository with a Semantic core.

  5. Jul 2017
    1. generate fake FCC filings, or advance their big government agenda.

      Most evidence I've seen online indicates that there's been a fair amount of fake filings from everyone, with the majority of spam likely coming from the "against" side.

      This is (one of the reasons) why it's better to do controlled studies rather than asking people to voluntarily submit their own opinions. Most of the studies I have seen suggest that both Republicans and Democrats broadly support a data agnostic Internet.

    2. Under these regulations, government bureaucrats can decide what websites they can prioritize or punish and what broadband infrastructure investments are worth.

      That is quite literally the opposite of what Network Neutrality does. A common carrier, by definition, does not prioritize or punish any content.

      Net Neutrality advocates want the exact same thing you do - an Internet where no one, even the government, can arbitrarily decide that one website or service gets an artificial competitive advantage over another.

  6. Apr 2017
    1. Mozilla Web Literacy Map (https://wiki.mozilla.org/Webmaker/WebLiteracyMap).

      Chatting with Mozilla's current person in charge about open practice/pedagogy. We could quote her here

  7. Feb 2017
  8. Dec 2016
  9. Sep 2016
    1. curate

      The term may still sound somewhat misleading to those who work in, say, museums (where “curator” is a very specific job title). But the notion behind it is quite important, especially when it comes to Open Education. A big part of the job is to find resources and bring them together for further reuse, remix, and reappropriation. In French, we often talk about «veille technologique», which is basically about watching/monitoring relevant resources, especially online.

  10. Jul 2016
    1. Decentralized Web Summit (June 8-9, 2016) Tim Berners-Lee, Vint Cerf, Brewster Kahle, Cory Doctorow

  11. Jun 2016
  12. Apr 2016
    1. Books can learn from the web how to be bounded, but open.The web can learn from books how to be open, but bounded.
    1. Reasons Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram have dominated the Web over blogs and independent sites:

      • People prefer a single interface that makes it easy to flip or scroll through the new stuff. They don't like visiting a dozen different sites with different interfaces.
      • Most people don't want to deal with site structure or complex editors, let alone markup languages or servers.
      • Facebook quickly became a friends-and-family network, which pulled in more of the same.
      • Following and unfollowing should only require a single click.
      • Retweets and mentions introduce new people to follow, even if you aren't looking for them.
      • Reposting should be easy, include obvious attribution, and comments should be attached.
      • RSS readers had the potential to offer these things, but standard ways of using it were not widely adopted. Then Google Reader pushed out other readers, but was nevertheless shut down.

      Let go of the idea of people reading your stuff on your site, and develop or support interfaces that put your readers in control of how they view the web instead of giving the control to the people with the servers.

    1. the hyperlink provided a diversity and decentralisation that the real world lacked
    2. We’re also losing the organic and open shape of the web. It’s becoming something much more rigid and more hierarchical.
    3. The hyperlink was a way to abandon centralization — all the links, lines and hierarchies — and replace them with something more distributed, a system of nodes and networks.
    1. "connected copies" - multiple copies of pages and other files stored across the Web, accessed by name rather than just a single address.

      Some examples already exist: git, torrents, federated wiki, various named data networking projects, and the Interplanetary File System.

      Distributed copies fight link rot and reduce Internet traffic congestion. More importantly, if the files are freely licensed, easy to copy, and easy to edit, the concept reaches toward the full peer-to-peer potential of the Web.

  13. Mar 2016
    1. Open data

      Sadly, there may not be much work on opening up data in Higher Education. For instance, there was only one panel at last year’s international Open Data Conference. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NUtQBC4SqTU

      Looking at the interoperability of competency profiles, been wondering if it could be enhanced through use of Linked Open Data.

  14. Jan 2016
    1. While there are some features shared between a university repository and us we are distinctly different for the following reasons: We offer DOIs to all content published on The Winnower All content is automatically typeset on The Winnower Content published on the winnower is not restricted to one university but is published amongst work from peers at different institutions around the world Work is published from around the world it is more discoverable We offer Altmetrics to content  Our site is much more visually appealing than a typical repository  Work can be openly reviewed on The Winnower but often times not even commented on in repositories. This is not to say that repositories have no place, but that we should focus on offering authors choices not restricting them to products developed in house.

      Over this tension/complementary between in house and external publishing platforms I wonder where is the place for indie web self hosted publishing, like the one impulsed by grafoscopio.

      A reproducible structured interactive grafoscopio notebook is self contained in software and data and holds all its history by design. Will in-house solutions and open journals like The Winnower, RIO Journal or the Self Journal of Science, support such kinds of publishing artifacts?

      Technically there is not a big barrier (it's mostly about hosting fossil repositories, which is pretty easy, and adding a discoverability and author layer on top), but it seems that the only option now is going to big DVCS and data platforms now like GitHub or datahub alike for storing other research artifacts like software and data, so it is more about centralized-mostly instead of p2p-also. This other p2p alternatives seem outside the radar for most alternative Open Access and Open Science publishers now.

    1. Nothing really interesting grows there. For that you need the wilds of -- the open web -- of course. 

      The walled garden vs the wildflower?

    1. export books as apps

      On top of the whole debate between native apps and the Open Web, there’s a debate between apps and books. We might not reach the “Write Once, Publish Everywhere” dream, but there’s something to be said about having building blocks which are easy to adapt to different contexts.

  15. Dec 2015
    1. Anyone can say Anything

      The “Open World Assumption” is central to this post and to the actual shift in paradigm when it comes to moving from documents to data. People/institutions have an alleged interest in protecting the way their assets are described. Even libraries. The Open World Assumption makes it sound quite chaotic, to some ears. And claims that machine learning will solve everything tend not to help the unconvinced too much. Something to note is that this ability to say something about a third party’s resource connects really well with Web annotations (which do more than “add metadata” to those resources) and with the fact that no-cost access to some item of content isn’t the end of the openness.

  16. Nov 2015
  17. Sep 2015
    1. The W3C Annotation Working Group has a joint deliverable with the W3C Web Application Working Group called “Robust Anchoring”. This deliverable will provide a general framework for anchoring; and, although defined within the framework of annotations, the specification can also be used for other fragment identification use cases. Similarly, the W3C Media Fragments specification [media-frags] may prove useful to address some of the use cases. Finally, the Streamable Package Format draft, mentioned above, also includes a fragment identification mechanism. Would that package format be adopted for EPUB+WEB, that fragment identification may also come to the fore as an important mechanism to consider.

      Anchors are a key issue. Hope that deliverable will suffice.

  18. Aug 2015
    1. While these features have connected untold millions and created new forms of social organization, they also come at a cost. Material seems to vanish almost as quickly as it is created, disappearing amid broken links or into the constant flow of the social media “stream.” It can be hard to distinguish fact from falsehood. Corporations have stepped into this confusion, organizing our browsing and data in decidedly closed, non-transparent ways. Did it really have to turn out this way?

      La web, utopía y distopía en simultánea.

    1. The Training and Learning Architecture (TLA) encompasses a set of standardized Web service specifications and Open Source Software (OSS) designed to create a rich environment for connected training and learning.
  19. Mar 2015
    1. Here’s a presentation at the 2013 Personal Democracy Forum that provides a little more context for our project.

      This is an inspiring talk.