11 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2018
  2. Jan 2016
    1. That’s how we forged a Trans-Pacific Partnership to open markets, and protect workers and the environment, and advance American leadership in Asia. It cuts 18,000 taxes on products made in America, which will then support more good jobs here in America. With TPP, China does not set the rules in that region; we do. You want to show our strength in this new century? Approve this agreement. Give us the tools to enforce it. It's the right thing to do.

      No. The TPP was written by corporations, for corporations. It betrays national sovereignty and individual rights.

      http://www.michaelgeist.ca/tag/tpp/<br> https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2015/12/how-tpp-will-affect-you-and-your-digital-rights<br> https://act.eff.org/action/tell-congress-to-vote-no-on-the-tpp

    2. So, my fellow Americans, whatever you may believe, whether you prefer one party or no party, our collective future depends on your willingness to uphold your obligations as a citizen.  To vote.  To speak out.

      Absolutely, but it's government's job at all levels--from our hometowns to Washington, DC--to make it easier for citizens to do that. Far too many Americans simply can't fulfill many of these "obligations as a citizen," due to work, or kids or fear or lack of information, or school, basically, life. Government has to lower those barriers, make it way more possible for citizens to do their civic duties. There's a tremendous opportunity to deploy free, open source tools--heck, even proprietary ones--here.

    3. It doesn’t work if we think the people who disagree with us are all motivated by malice, or that our political opponents are unpatriotic.  Democracy grinds to a halt without a willingness to compromise; or when even basic facts are contested, and we listen only to those who agree with us. 

      C'mon, civic technologists, government innovators, open data advocates: this can be a call to arms. Isn't the point of "open government" to bring people together to engage with their leaders, provide the facts, and allow more informed, engaged debate?

    4. It will only happen if we fix our politics. A better politics doesn’t mean we have to agree on everything.  This is a big country, with different regions and attitudes and interests.  That’s one of our strengths, too.  Our Founders distributed power between states and branches of government, and expected us to argue, just as they did, over the size and shape of government, over commerce and foreign relations, over the meaning of liberty and the imperatives of security.

      While technology doesn't solve everything, I firmly believe it has a critical role to play in fixing our politics. Better and easier ways for citizens to hold their government accountable, engage with their elected officials and each other, and way more exist. We're using one right now.

    5. 10,000 air strikes

      Recent statistics I read in the NYTimes. Number of ISIS fighters in 2014 = 30,000. Number of fighters killed in air strikes in 2015 = 25,000. Number of ISIS fighters at the end of 2015 = 30,000. New math? 30 - 25 = 30? (And only 6 non-combatants were killed the U.S. claims.)

    6. That’s how we forged a Trans-Pacific Partnership to open markets, protect workers and the environment, and advance American leadership in Asia.  It cuts 18,000 taxes on products Made in America, and supports more good jobs.  With TPP, China doesn’t set the rules in that region, we do.  You want to show our strength in this century?  Approve this agreement.  Give us the tools to enforce it. 

      An opportunity to employ online, open co-creation tools. Such as, say, Hypothes.is. Or what the D.C.'s Mayor Bowser and city council are doing with the Madison online policymaking software.

      Back when this was still being negotiated in secret, a leaked chapter of TPP was opened on the very first version of Madison. What could've been as far as harnessing open online annotation for transparent, smarter policy outcomes.

    7. how do we make technology work for us, and not against us

      This is a critical question for both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue, and for every presidential candidate. But at least the President and Congressional leaders are talking about it--we've heard next to nothing from all the candidates for the White House, and next to nothing at all the debates.

      I wonder: what happens to 18F, USDS, each agency's online engagement staff, etc. the day after a GOP candidate wins? What happens if the White House stays with Democrats? Beats me, and that's incredibly problematic.

      Either way, Congress can and should also play a role in supporting--at least maintaining--the progress made on open source, adopting/creating better tech, outfits like 18F/USDS. Building out a Congressional-and-civil-society "tech transition survival" plan would be a great, bipartisan, bicameral project. I think it's also fully within the realm of possibility.

    8. climate

      Ever need inspiration about youth? Check out their work on climate change on Youth Voices: http://youthvoices.net/search/node/climate

    1. President Obama will deliver his final State of the Union address on January 12, 2016 at 9PM ET. Watch as he reflects on the road we've traveled in the last seven years.

      Join teachers and students from around the country to annotate Obama's last State of the Union address on Tuesday at 9PM. Join Jeremy Dean, as he leads an "annotatathon" -- one of many we hope to see during this electoral season, as part of the Letters to the Next President project, co-sponsored by the NWP and WQED. Keep your eye out for the link to the transcript of the speech then join us on hypothes.is to annotate it live -- or later this week. Have your students join us live or later in the week as well!

  3. Jan 2015
    1. I intend to protect a free and open internet, extend its reach to every classroom, and every community, and help folks build the fastest networks, so that the next generation of digital innovators and entrepreneurs have the platform to keep reshaping our world.

      Comments of Barack Obama in the State of the Union 2015. This was preceded by a YouTube video about Affordable High-Speed Broadband for All Americans