28 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2021
    1. I hadn't really thought that much about the pedagogical aspects (they don't really teach PhD historians pedagogy where I went to school, or I missed it somehow, so I've been trying to educate myself since then).

      Don't feel bad, I don't think many (any?!) programs do this. It's a terrible disservice to academia.

      Examples of programs that do this would be fantastic to have. Or even an Open Education based course that covers some of this would be an awesome thing to see.

  2. Oct 2020
    1. And though flags from this software don’t automatically mean students will be penalized—instructors can review the software’s suspicions and decide for themselves how to proceed—it leaves open the possibility that instructors’ own biases will determine whether to bring academic dishonesty charges against students. Even just an accusation could negatively affect a student’s academic record, or at the very least how their instructor perceives them and their subsequent work.

      The companies are hiding behind this as a feature - that the algorithms are not supposed to be implemented without human review. I wonder how this "feature" will interact with implicit (and explicit) biases, or with the power dynamics between adjuncts, students, and departmental administration.

      The companies are caught between a rock and a hard place in the decision whether students should be informed that their attempt was flagged for review, or not. We see that, if the student is informed, it causes stress and pain and damage to the teacher-student relationship. But if they're not informed, all these issues of bias and power become invisible.

  3. Jul 2020
  4. Jun 2020
  5. Jan 2020
    1. I didn’t know where the class was headed

      Another Reggio philosophy is understanding that to practice a Pedagogy of Listening and teaching into the intentions of our students makes us vulnerable and that we have to become more comfortable living with doubt and uncertainty. We participate in a process of Negotiated Learning that is child originated and teacher framed. This is an early childhood approach, and my background (K-4). Possibly adolescents can frame their own learning? Here is more info on Negotiated Learning.

  6. Oct 2019
  7. Sep 2019
    1. When assignments are optional, compliance will vary and you risk exacerbating differences in study skills, background knowledge, and the like.

      I can't help but wonder if the emphasis on "content retention" and "compliance" that seems to be core to the authors' concept of learning doesn't make some bad assumptions: that learning is something that an instructor does to a student, and not something that students have agency over. This seems to me to be in extreme conflict with what might be even more inclusive practice: far less emphasis on the grade, more individual attention and greater emphasis on personal growth, less teacher control and more student agency. This is basic Freire stuff. Students aren't vessels to be filled.

    2. Reach out to those who didn’t do so well and express your willingness to help them. Check in with students who have missed a class or two.

      It's worth noting that none of this is easy or efficient. If it was, we'd all do it. One must make a concerted effort to ensure students feel like they belong and that they're supported so that they can learn best. If that's not part of an instructor's job, then what exactly is the instructor's job?

    3. minimize inequities

      minimize inequities = reduce harm; clear similarities to Hippocratic oath. See also Kaufman & Schipper (2018) Teaching With Compassion, p. xxiii

    4. Traditional teaching methods do not serve all students well.

      Emphasis on all. Frequently defensiveness kicks in when traditional teaching is called into question, because it does work, but just for some.

  8. Feb 2019
    1. Pedagogical knowledge (PK) is teachers’ deep knowledge about the processes and practices or methods of teaching and learning. They encompass, among other things, overall educational purposes, values, and aims. This generic form of knowledge applies to understanding how students learn, general classroom management skills, lesson planning, and student assessment

      This is what we learn in "teacher school". This is why we learn about many different ways of teaching and why the education system is set up the way that it is. Pedagogy is probably the most important aspect of lesson planning because it shows that we have an understanding of not only making content interesting to our students but managing behavior and assessing if they understand the information, all at the same time.

    2. Equally important to the model are the interactions between and among these bodies of knowledge, represented as PCK, TCK (technological content knowledge), TPK (technological pedagogicalknowledge), and TPACK

      The interaction of all three areas is important because it will help us to understand technology when it comes to lesson planning and content knowledge. Knowing what types of technology to use based on our pedagogical methods and the content that we are teaching our students will help us to implement them to ensure full understanding from our students.

  9. Oct 2018
    1. Dissimilarly, in Teaching to Transgress, bell hooks urges teachers to contemplate “Education as the practice of freedom” as their point of departure for praxis. A phrase originating from the work of Paulo Freire, hooks writes that “education as the practice of freedom” will come easiest “to those of us…who believe that our work is not merely to share information, but to share in the intellectual and spiritual growth of our students. To teach in a manner that respects and cares for the souls of our students is essential if we are to provide the necessary conditions where learning can most deeply and intimately begin.” Transgressive education and disruptive thinking therefore begin with the soul, and not the prospective career opportunities, of students.
  10. Nov 2016
    1. Speech, writing, math notation, various kinds of graphs, and musical notation are all examples of cognitive technologies. They are tools that help us think, and they can become part of the way we think -- and change the way we think.

      Computer interfaces can be cognitive technologies. To whatever degree an interface reflects a set of ideas or methods of working, mastering the interface provides mastery of those ideas or methods.

      Experts often have ways of thinking that they rarely share with others, for various reasons. Sometimes they aren't fully aware of their thought processes. The thoughts may be difficult to convey in speech or print. The thoughts may seem sloppy compared to traditional formal explanations.

      These thought processes often involve:

      • minimal canonical examples - simple models
      • heuristics for rapid reasoning about what might work

      Nielsen considers turning such thought processes into (computer) interfaces. "Every theorem of mathematics, every significant result of science, is a challenge to our imagination as interface designers. Can we find ways of expressing these principles in an interface? What new objects and operations does a principle suggest?"

  11. Jun 2016
    1. adaptive learning - a broad range of software and techniques that attempt ongoing customization of lessons for each student.

      Ideally, adaptive learning is like providing a personal tutor for each student. It can also help a teacher determine which topics need more attention for individual students or the class as a whole. And it may free up class time that would otherwise be used lecturing on basics.

  12. Apr 2016
    1. Convinced that big undergraduate lectures are ineffectual, Wieman long ago ditched those big performances in favor of getting students to problem-solve. He gets them actively engaged with course material, working in smaller groups. The techniques have become known as an evidence-based, "active learning" style of teaching.
  13. Mar 2016
  14. Feb 2016
  15. Jan 2016
    1. Dweck’s message is that we can’t just adopt a growth mindset and forget about it, and simply praising effort regardless of actual progress is completely counterproductive. Successfully cultivating a growth mindset is an ongoing process that consists of teaching strategies for growth and praising effort thoughtfully, rather than regardlessly.

      "Recently, someone asked what keeps me up at night. It's the fear that the mindset concepts, which grew up to counter the failed self-esteem movement, will be used to perpetuate that movement." -- Carol Dweck

    1. Using the Web and Wikipedia to make writing assignments more relevant and instructive. Includes links to Wikipedia tools for educators.

    1. How should we measure student engagement? Certainly not by using computers to force feed students fixed lesson plans.

      Gardner Campbell's presentation at UNF Academic Technology Innovation Summit, November 2015.

    1. The whole organic nature of learning experience through the #walkmyworld learning events meant that I learned what I needed to learn as I needed to learn it. It wasn’t a top down dictate of learning outcomes because the outcomes were determined by the process. It is a revolutionary concept — yet as ancient as Aristotle. Learning should never be measured solely by standard outcomes; people learn, and I mean really LEARN, when they discover for themselves what they know, what they want to know, and how they want to know it.
  16. www.participate.com www.participate.com
    1. Participate Learning Twitter client for education twitter chats. Choose from more than 150 chats, or request to have one added. Sign in with Twitter to view live or archived tweets, a list of participants, and a list of links that were shared.

      Participate Learning provides categorized, vetted educational resources, both free and commercial, and online tools for curating collections and collaborating with other educators.

      https://medium.com/@alanwarms/why-we-launched-participate-chats-5f1d0a61b2b8

    1. Over the years, I've challenged the notion of just having kids read on their own at school. (Or, maybe not so much challenged the notion as told people about the actual research findings on this topic which aren't so wonderful.) I’ve not been a friend to DEAR, SSR, SQUIRT, or similar schemes that set aside daily amounts of time for self selected reading in the classroom.              Most studies don’t find much pay off for this kind of reading—either in reading achievement or motivation to read. There are many better things to do if your goal is to encourage reading than to just tell kids to go read on their own (a directive that sounds a lot like, “go away and leave me alone").

      Timothy Shanahan of U of IL Chicago says we aren't spending enough time on reading and writing instruction.

  17. Dec 2015
    1. constructivism (Jean Piaget) - Learners must actively construct their body of knowledge, their schema, through experience and reflection. When we encounter a new idea, we can do one of three things:

      • decide that it's irrelevant, and ignore it
      • assimilate it into our existing schema
      • accommodate it by modifying our schema

      social constructivism (Lev Vygotsky) - emphasized that building knowledge is a social process

      constructionism (Seymour Papert) - Learning works best when we are publicly building artifacts -- of any kind whatsoever. While communicating with others, we get valuable feedback, and learn to put thoughts in various concrete forms.

  18. Nov 2015
    1. In one study at San Diego State University, students enrolled in an Introductory Psychology course were taught using three kinds of lectures: one that incorporated course content-related humor; one that included humor, but not related to the course material; and one that used no humor at all. When researchers tested student’s retention of knowledge six weeks later, they found that those who attended lectures with course-related humor scored significantly higher than the other students.