18 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
  2. Oct 2019
    1. In the front row, an older lady was reading Summer's End by Danielle Steele.

      That same woman attends the event every year and is known to bring along the SMH to read. Seems she's realised her choice had come down to two mostly-fictional items of content and chose to join the growing cohort of ex-readers. Sorry you had to find out this way.

      On a positive note, this woman is clearly a candidate for one of the SMH's super duper 80 per cent off subscription deals.

      You should go and personally save this reader so that you get a good mention from management at the upcoming staff retrenchment function.

  3. Sep 2019
    1. “But then again,” a person who used information in this way might say, “it’s not like I would be deliberately discriminating against anyone. It’s just an unfortunate proxy variable for lack of privilege and proximity to state violence.

      In the current universe, Twitter also makes a number of predictions about users that could be used as proxy variables for economic and cultural characteristics. It can display things like your audience's net worth as well as indicators commonly linked to political orientation. Triangulating some of this data could allow for other forms of intended or unintended discrimination.

      I've already been able to view a wide range (possibly spurious) information about my own reading audience through these analytics. On September 9th, 2019, I started a Twitter account for my 19th Century Open Pedagogy project and began serializing installments of critical edition, The Woman in White: Grangerized. The @OPP19c Twitter account has 62 followers as of September 17th.

      Having followers means I have access to an audience analytics toolbar. Some of the account's followers are nineteenth-century studies or pedagogy organizations rather than individuals. Twitter tracks each account as an individual, however, and I was surprised to see some of the demographics Twitter broke them down into. (If you're one of these followers: thank you and sorry. I find this data a bit uncomfortable.)

      Within this dashboard, I have a "Consumer Buying Styles" display that identifies categories such as "quick and easy" "ethnic explorers" "value conscious" and "weight conscious." These categories strike me as equal parts confusing and problematic: (Link to image expansion)

      I have a "Marital Status" toolbar alleging that 52% of my audience is married and 49% single.

      I also have a "Home Ownership" chart. (I'm presuming that the Elizabeth Gaskell House Museum's Twitter is counted as an owner...)

      ....and more

  4. Jul 2019
    1. Amazon introduced the all-new Kindle Oasis

      This Mashable review says it all:

      Amazon barely tried [...] With the exception of a new warm light feature, Amazon's 2019 Kindle Oasis is virtually unchanged, which is extremely disappointing.

  5. Nov 2018
  6. Jul 2018
    1. Did Google’s killing Reader kill the web? Or did Reader at least do some initial trial strangling?

      gaslighting perhaps?

  7. Jan 2018
    1. Digital rhetoric in many ways erodes the distance between rhetor and reader, producer and user.

      I think Eyman's vision of a remixable version of this text begins to move in this direction. But if this is the case, I think we need to think more deeply about how readers work as co-producers in all of these elements of the rhetorical canon.

  8. Oct 2017
  9. May 2017
  10. Mar 2017
    1. The Eskimo reading is unaccepta­ble because there is at present no interpretive strategy for pro­ducing it, no way of "looking" or reading (and remember, all acts of looking or reading are "ways") that would result in the emergence of obviously Eskiri:lO meanings. This does not mean, however, that no such strategy could ever come into play, and it is not difficult to imagine the circumstances under which it would establish itself.

      And this is the point.

  11. Aug 2016
    1. Page 2

      Borgman on the responsibility of rears to assess reliability and the ability of content creators to have control over their work:

      these are exciting and confusing times for scholarship. The proliferation of digital content allows new questions to be asked in new ways, but also results unduplication and dispersion. Authors can disseminate their work more widely by posting online, but readers have the additional responsibility of assessing trust and authenticity. Changes in intellectual property laws give Pharmacontrol to the creators of digital content that was available for printed comment, but the resulting business models often constrain access to scholarly resources. Students acquire an insatiable appetite for digital publications, and then find an graduation that they can barely sample them without institutional affiliations.

  12. Mar 2016
  13. Dec 2015
    1. And the result is a book, which is being released this month by Polity Press.

      The metaphor behind "release" is pretty profound. Released into the wild. Like the book is a injured wild thing that has been nursed to health and now returns to the zeitgeist from whence it came? More like a domesticated thing that we allow in and out through the pet flap in the door?

      I am thinking more in terms of 'reader response' theory which argues among other things that the book as a stable thing that the authors have control over no longer exists once it is 'released' into the reader wild. As lit-crit David Bleich once noted, "Knowledge is made by people, not found."

  14. Feb 2014
    1. is writing follows an unbreakable convention: to conceal any sign that the author or the intended reader is a human b eing. It gives the impression that, from the stated de nitions, the desired results follow infallibly by a purely mechanical pro cedure. In fact, no computing ma- chine has ever b een built that could accept his de nitions as inputs.
    1. For my part, I shall not say that this or that story is true, but I shall identify the one who I myself know did the Greeks unjust deeds, and thus proceed with my history, and speak of small and great cities of men alike.

      1.5. Herodotus speaks to the reader again.

  15. Nov 2013
    1. good to see others want to move highlights/annotation between Moon+ Reader Pro and other systems like Calibre