12 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2018
  2. Jul 2018
    1. Did Google’s killing Reader kill the web? Or did Reader at least do some initial trial strangling?

      gaslighting perhaps?

  3. Jan 2018
    1. Digital rhetoric in many ways erodes the distance between rhetor and reader, producer and user.

      I think Eyman's vision of a remixable version of this text begins to move in this direction. But if this is the case, I think we need to think more deeply about how readers work as co-producers in all of these elements of the rhetorical canon.

  4. Oct 2017
  5. May 2017
  6. Mar 2017
    1. The Eskimo reading is unaccepta­ble because there is at present no interpretive strategy for pro­ducing it, no way of "looking" or reading (and remember, all acts of looking or reading are "ways") that would result in the emergence of obviously Eskiri:lO meanings. This does not mean, however, that no such strategy could ever come into play, and it is not difficult to imagine the circumstances under which it would establish itself.

      And this is the point.

  7. Aug 2016
    1. Page 2

      Borgman on the responsibility of rears to assess reliability and the ability of content creators to have control over their work:

      these are exciting and confusing times for scholarship. The proliferation of digital content allows new questions to be asked in new ways, but also results unduplication and dispersion. Authors can disseminate their work more widely by posting online, but readers have the additional responsibility of assessing trust and authenticity. Changes in intellectual property laws give Pharmacontrol to the creators of digital content that was available for printed comment, but the resulting business models often constrain access to scholarly resources. Students acquire an insatiable appetite for digital publications, and then find an graduation that they can barely sample them without institutional affiliations.

  8. Mar 2016
  9. Dec 2015
    1. And the result is a book, which is being released this month by Polity Press.

      The metaphor behind "release" is pretty profound. Released into the wild. Like the book is a injured wild thing that has been nursed to health and now returns to the zeitgeist from whence it came? More like a domesticated thing that we allow in and out through the pet flap in the door?

      I am thinking more in terms of 'reader response' theory which argues among other things that the book as a stable thing that the authors have control over no longer exists once it is 'released' into the reader wild. As lit-crit David Bleich once noted, "Knowledge is made by people, not found."

  10. Feb 2014
    1. is writing follows an unbreakable convention: to conceal any sign that the author or the intended reader is a human b eing. It gives the impression that, from the stated de nitions, the desired results follow infallibly by a purely mechanical pro cedure. In fact, no computing ma- chine has ever b een built that could accept his de nitions as inputs.
    1. For my part, I shall not say that this or that story is true, but I shall identify the one who I myself know did the Greeks unjust deeds, and thus proceed with my history, and speak of small and great cities of men alike.

      1.5. Herodotus speaks to the reader again.

  11. Nov 2013
    1. good to see others want to move highlights/annotation between Moon+ Reader Pro and other systems like Calibre