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  1. Last 7 days
    1. Examples of potentially unlawful conduct include insults, taunting, or ethnic epithets, such as making fun of a person's foreign accent or comments like, "Go back to where you came from, " whether made by supervisors or by co-workers.

      The insidiousness of "Go back to where you come from" has been recognized for a long time.

  2. Jul 2019
    1. If an agent asks you for documents, what you need to provide differs depending on your immigration status. U.S. citizens do not have to carry proof of citizenship on their person if they are in the United States.

      rights of US citizens

    1. The Battlestar Galactica, an aircraft carrier in space that fought in the earlier war, is in the final stages of being decommissioned and converted to a museum when the attack occurs. During her decades of colonial service the Galactica's computer systems had never been networked so the Galactica is unaffected by the Cylon sabotage.

      Galactica, using old tech, was saved from the Cylon hack.

    1. The privacy policy against surveillance seems to be better in G Suite (which is not free) seems to be better than that of Google Drive (which is free of charge).

  3. Jun 2019
    1. http://www.flickr.com/photos/raymondyee/archives/

      Unfortunately, this URL structure is broken now. Sigh.

  4. May 2019
    1. If you run it, it should read a data file, run some tests, and print a message like, “All tests passed.”

      You need to run the code within the code directory.

  5. Feb 2019
    1. Then, about 15 minutes into the address, Mr. Trump hit on an issue foremost in his consciousness — the looming threat of congressional investigations into his conduct.First, he offered what amounted to a plea for the new Democratic majority in the House to avoid “ridiculous partisan investigations” and cautioned his enemies not to seek “revenge” against him.Then came the bluntest of threats to the woman sitting behind him, Speaker Nancy Pelosi: “If there is going to be peace and legislation, there cannot be war and investigation. It just doesn’t work that way!” he said.

      Trump's attack on investigations into his administration

  6. Jan 2019
    1. 1:15 a.m.American Indian tribes in the Upper Midwest are helping members in need with heating supplies as extreme cold sets in.On the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in the Dakotas, many people live in housing that's decades old and in disrepair, or in emergency government housing left over from southern disasters such as hurricanes.Tribe emergency manager Elliott Ward says those structures don't hold up well to extreme cold and strong wind. Wind chills in the area early Tuesday were as low as minus 39 (negative 39 degrees Celsius).In northern Minnesota, the wind chill was as low as minus 59 (negative 51 degrees Celsius).White Earth Band of Ojibwe (oh-JIHB'-wah) energy assistance manager Chris Fairbanks calls it "a scary situation." She says officials are swamped getting people the heating help they need.

      situation on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in the extreme cold.

  7. Dec 2018
    1. If you haven't filled out an Emergency Form, you can download it, fill it out, and send it to Margaret.

    1. A lawyer for Mr. Weisselberg, Mary E. Mulligan, also declined to comment, as did Guy Petrillo, a lawyer for Mr. Cohen.

      Per Maggie Haberman on "The Washington Weekly" (Dec 14, 2018) , it's "not nothing" that Weisselberg has his own lawyer apart from the group counsel representing the Trump organization

    1. And here’s the thing: As far as I can tell, not a single prominent Republican in Washington has condemned the power grab in Wisconsin, the similar grab in Michigan, or even what looks like outright electoral fraud in North Carolina. Elected Republicans don’t just increasingly share the values of white nationalist parties like Fidesz or Poland’s Law and Justice; they also share those parties’ contempt for democracy. The G.O.P. is an authoritarian party in waiting.

      I've been looking for Republicans who are speaking out against this anti-democratic power grab by Republicans in WI.

    1. Fentanyl, a newer synthetic opioid painkiller, is 50 to 100 times more potent than morphine and 30 to 50 times more potent than heroin,[57] with only 2 mg becoming a lethal dose. It is pure white, odorless and flavorless, with a potency strong enough that police and first responders helping overdose victims have themselves overdosed by simply touching or inhaling a small amount.[193][194][195]

      .

  8. Nov 2018
    1. Neutronium (sometimes shortened to neutrium,[1] also referred to as neutrite[2]) is a hypothetical substance composed purely of neutrons.

      claim that neutronium is a "hypothetical substance"

    1. Ctrl+Space

      Unfortunately, this keyboard shortcut conflicts with one in ChromeOS (for changing back to the previous input method)

    2. Now you know how to search for all works of art, or all buildings, or all human settlements: the magic incantation wdt:P31/wdt:P279*, along with the appropriate class. This uses some more SPARQL features that I haven’t explained yet, but quite honestly, this is almost the only relevant use of those features, so you don’t need to understand how it works in order to use WDQS effectively. If you want to know, I’ll explain it in a bit, but you can also just skip the next section and memorize or copy+paste wdt:P31/wdt:P279* from here when you need it.

      wdt:P31/wdt:P279* = magic incantation for Wikidata SPARQL to mean "instance of or subclass of"

    1. And right now, you don't hear a lot of people who put climate as their number one issue. You don't hear a lot of them offering constructive innovative solutions for the future. It's usually just a lot of alarmism, but I think the report is important and it shows that the climate is changing.

      Ben Sasse, who fashions himself as being a reasonable voice, labels as "alarmist" people who think climate change is the number one issue.

  9. Oct 2018
    1. I’d rather have an informed nonvoter than an uninformed voter going in and making a choice they don’t understand.

      We must inform ourselves and others.

  10. Sep 2018
    1. 22. For Social Service Heavenly Father, whose blessed Son came not to be served but to serve: Bless all who, following in his steps, give themselves to the service of others; that with wisdom, patience, and courage, they may minister in his Name to the suffering, the friendless, and the needy; for the love of him who laid down his life for us, your Son our Savior Jesus Christ, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

      a fitting collect for Stephen Ministry

  11. Jul 2018
    1. To her, this was a moral threat far greater than any character flaw Trump might have, as was what she called “the racial divide,” which she believed was getting worse. The evidence was all the black people protesting about the police, and all the talk about the legacy of slavery, which Sheila never believed was as bad as people said it was. “Slaves were valued,” she said. “They got housing. They got fed. They got medical care.” She was suspicious of what she saw as the constant agitation of blacks against whites, the taking down of Confederate memorials and the raising of others, such as the new memorial to the victims of lynching, just up the highway in Montgomery. “I think they are promoting violence,” Sheila said, thinking about the 800 weathered, steel monoliths hanging from a roof to evoke the lynchings, one for each American county where the violence was carried out, including Crenshaw County, where a man named Jesse Thornton was lynched in 1940 in downtown Luverne. “How do you think a young black man would feel looking at that?” Linda asked. “Wouldn’t you feel a sickness in your stomach?” “I think it would only make you have more violent feelings — feelings of revenge,” said Sheila. It reminded her of a time when she was a girl in Montgomery, when the now-famous civil rights march from Selma was heading to town and her parents, fearing violence, had sent her to the country to stay with relatives. “It’s almost like we’re going to live that Rosa Parks time again,” she said, referring to the civil rights activist. “It was just a scary time, having lived through it.” She thought an all-out race war was now in the realm of possibility. And that was where she had feared things were heading, right up until election night, when she and Linda and everyone they knew were praying for God to save them. And God sent them Donald Trump.

      Probably the most striking part of this article is what Sheila Butler says about slavery, the "racial divide", and the possibility of an all-out race war.

    1. Adult patrons can now borrow telescopes! Two Orion 4.5” Starblast Reflector Telescopes are now available from the Central Library First Floor Service Desk. Telescopes check out for one week. They come with instructions and are easy to use. Stop by and try one out today!

      Wow

    1. Andrew Ng — a former Baidu executive, Drive.AI board member, and one of the industry’s most prominent boosters — argues the problem is less about building a perfect driving system than training bystanders to anticipate self-driving behavior. In other words, we can make roads safe for the cars instead of the other way around. As an example of an unpredictable case, I asked him whether he thought modern systems could handle a pedestrian on a pogo stick, even if they had never seen one before. “I think many AV teams could handle a pogo stick user in pedestrian crosswalk,” Ng told me. “Having said that, bouncing on a pogo stick in the middle of a highway would be really dangerous.” “Rather than building AI to solve the pogo stick problem, we should partner with the government to ask people to be lawful and considerate,” he said. “Safety isn’t just about the quality of the AI technology.”

      Is Andrew Ng actually saying that pedestrians have to learn to accommodate self-driving cars and not the other way around?

    1. Another common area of pain occurs near the middle of the top of the foot, generally a bit to the outside of the foot. In this area of the foot the tendons that go to the toes can become inflamed. This is called extensor tendonitis. One cause of this condition is excessive tightness of the calf muscle. When the calf muscle is tight it places excessive stress on the tendons on the top of the foot that pull the foot upward and against the tightness of the calf muscles. Wearing a shoe with a one-inch heel will help to take the stress off of the tendons on the top of the foot. Aggressive stretching of the calf muscle is also very helpful. Oral anti-inflammatory medications can help. When these measures do not work a functional orthotic should be tried. The orthotic corrects the alignment of the foot taking the stress off of the tendons on the top of the foot.

      extensor tendonitis

  12. Jun 2018
    1. "So I am in full sympathy with these critiques of ICE, but I think it's unrealistic to think that if we eliminate ICE, we will get rid of the problem. Because I think Congress will then turn around and expand the powers of CBP, and basically restore its powers to conduct interior enforcement. That's what it was doing before 9/11. It was doing both border and interior enforcement. So Congress will either do that, or they'll create a new agency. I think the solution is to create some kind of permanent oversight body, and ideally by Congress, and an oversight body that has some kind of enforcement power."

      Key recommendation from Debbie Kang re congressional oversight of ICE and CBP

    1. Dozens of panicked workers fled in every direction, some wedging themselves between beef carcasses or crouching under bloody butcher tables. About 100 workers, including at least one American citizen, were rounded up — every Latino employee at the plant, it turned out, save a man who had hidden in a freezer.

      ICE incarcerated at least one American citizen and every Latino employee at the plant

    1. KASIE HUNT: I think it's becoming a litmus test for this issue in potentially a 2020 primary situation. I mean, if you think about Kamala Harris in particular, she has been very consistent quite frankly, if you're an activist on immigration, she is one of your people. She took a vote in the Senate, she was one of only three Democrats, kind of buck their own party on a compromise. I mean she - I mean she is, I don't want to quite describe it as farthest to the left, but she is one far edge -- CHUCK TODD: Of sort of the mainstream presidentials on this issue. KASIE HUNT: Of this issue. She is setting the bar for where that is. And people, frankly, are responding. I mean, the event that we went to cover, she went to visit a detention center where mothers were being held that'd been separated. And they didn't organize a rally, but there were hundreds of people who showed up on the street outside, some with organizations, the A.C.L.U., others, but they came, and they came to see her.

      Kasie Hunt argues that Kamala Harris has been a consistent ally to immigration activists.

    1. But this cycle of work and visits became much harder to execute after the United States passed the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882. This draconian law barred the entry of Chinese laborers, yet also ended up stimulating the formation of Chinese businesses through a system of visa preferences. Owners of particular businesses could obtain “merchant status,” which enabled them to enter the United States and sponsor relatives. After a 1915 court case granted these special immigration privileges to Chinese restaurant owners, entrepreneurial people in the United States and China opened restaurants as a way to bypass restrictions in U.S. immigration law. Flows of newcomers from China were diverted into the restaurant industry.

      Exception for Chinese restaurant owners in 1915 despite Chinese Exclusion Action of 1882.

    1. At what distance does the MyNotifi® device disconnect from the smart phone app? Bluetooth Low Energy connects to about 30 meters. This can be affected in buildings and houses depending on how many walls separate the device from the smart phone. The amount of electrical in the walls can also affect connection of Bluetooth Low Energy. It is recommended to keep your smart phone on your person or within close proximity, not only for MyNotifi®, but for other reasons as well.

      must keep MyNotfi devices within 30m of smartphone to be in BTLE range

    1. Calculating Statistical Significance We calculate statistical significance using a standard 95% confidence level. When we display an answer option as statistically significant, it means the difference between two groups has less than a 5% probability of occurring by chance or sampling error alone, which is often displayed as p < 0.05. To calculate the statistical significance between groups, we use the following formulas: Statistic Description Formula a1The proportion of the first group answering a question a certain way multiplied by the sample size of that group.b1The proportion of the second group answering a question a certain way multiplied by the sample size of that group.Pooled Sample Proportion (p)The combination of the two proportions for both groups.Standard Error (SE)A measure of how far your proportion is from the true proportion. A smaller number means the proportion is close to the true proportion, a larger number means the proportion is far away from the true proportion.Test Statistic (t)A t-statistic. The number of standard deviations a number is away from the mean.Statistical SignificanceIf the absolute value of the test statistic is greater than 1.96* standard deviations of the mean, then it's considered a statistically significant difference. *1.96 is a number used for the 95% confidence level since 95% of the area under a student's t-distribution function lies within 1.96 standard deviations of the mean.

      How SurveyMonkey calculates statistical significance

    1. After more than 40 hours of research and over a month of testing 13 devices, we think the GreatCall Lively Mobile is the best medical alert system for most people. Unlike most devices, it can reach either 911 or a call center from anywhere in your home or out in the world. That means the GreatCall Lively Mobile can help in all manner of situations, from getting EMTs and loved ones on the scene after a fall to contacting a friend for you if you can’t find your phone (yes, really; we tried it). Share this review on Facebook Share this review on Twitter Save this review on Pocket Share this review on Pinterest Share this review with E-mail It’s less expensive per month than any similar device, and relatively stylish, too. But choosing a medical alert is a personal decision, so there are different factors to consider: If you won’t wear a medical alert that looks vaguely like a medical device, won’t remember to charge a medical alert, or will have trouble pushing a button during an emergency, we have picks for you, too. Our pick GreatCall Lively Mobile The best medical alert system Our favorite medical alert system is comfortable to wear around your neck or on a belt clip. We found that the call center picks up faster than the competition, typically 15 seconds after you push the button. $40 from GreatCall $34 from Walmart The water-resistant GreatCall Lively Mobile can dial a call center or 911 directly (the ability to do both is a rare feature) from anywhere, and it’s easier to wear than the competition: It can go on a lanyard (with a magnetic clasp) that’s long enough to slide over your head, or on a belt clip. The silver box and plain white indicator light are more understated than the competition, and GreatCall offers the lowest-cost month-to-month plan of anything we looked at. The battery lasts 24 hours, according to GreatCall, though we found it could go up to 50 hours with minimal use. The advertised battery life is on the low end of the models we tested, but our experts recommended getting in the habit of charging your medical alert every day anyway. The GreatCall Lively Mobile works anywhere there’s Verizon cell service, which we’ve found to be the most reliable network. Advertisement googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1524661673579-0'); }); Also great Lifestation At Home An at-home medical alert system Call for help from a room or two in your house with this less-expensive and easier-to-wear system, available in versions that connect to a landline or cell service. $26 from LifeStation If you are with someone whenever you leave your house and have a small living space, or just want protection in one place (like the shower), you might not need a mobile medical alert like our pick. An at-home medical alert is less expensive with a less bulky button to carry, but the range is very limited. Most at-home systems are similar, but we found the Lifestation At Home to be a little easier to use and less expensive than the competition (month-to-month plans are $30 per month for a device that connects to a landline, and $37 per month for one with cellular service). The major downside of the Lifestation At Home is that you cannot speak directly into the device. If you fall, you can push the button from a few hundred feet away from the base station to dial the call center, but you’ll need to be within shouting distance of the base station to communicate whether you’re in need of 911 help or just want an emergency contact to come help you get up. (If you are unable to speak, or the call center cannot hear you, they will follow a course of action that you specify when you sign up: call a family member, call EMTs, or some combination thereof.) The battery in the wearable button lasts three years, and the base unit plugs into the wall. The button connects to the base via radio signal. Also great Apple Watch Series 3 (aluminum) No call center and no contract Bare-bones emergency features, but the most stylish. $330 from Apple If looks matter to you and you have an iPhone, or if you may have trouble pushing a button in an emergency, consider the Apple Watch Series 3. Though it’s bare-bones in emergency functions, it’s much more discreet to wear than other devices we tested. Because compliance matters more than anything when it comes to these devices, wearability is important. At a one-time cost of a few hundred dollars, the Apple Watch works out to be less expensive than buying a separate medical alert with a monthly bill after about a year of use (not including the cost of iPhone service, which is required for the Apple Watch to place phone calls). A button on the side of the watch allows you to place a call to 911 and can alert your emergency contacts that you placed a call when you are in range of your phone or connected to the same Wi-Fi network, and you can speak directly into the watch. You can also place an ordinary nonemergency call through the watch, either by scrolling through your contacts list or saying, “Hey, Siri, call [contact].” The Apple Watch battery lasts 18 hours with some use (less if you’re using it to make frequent phone calls). In September 2017, Apple announced a version of the watch with LTE, but we recommend the one without cellular connectivity for now. Budget pick Ask My Buddy A bare-bones option for home A voice-controlled app that can give you added peace of mind, but can’t call 911. Buy from Ask My Buddy Amazon Echo Our favorite voice-controlled device It’s relatively easy to set up Ask My Buddy on the Amazon Echo, which can also play music, tell you the weather, and control smart devices. $180 from Amazon Buy from Amazon Buy from Amazon Buy from Amazon If you want an extra layer of security at home and are considering getting a voice-controlled smart-home device anyway, Ask My Buddy is a free service available on the Amazon Echo (here’s our full guide on Amazon’s Alexa devices). If you need help and are in the same room, you can say “Alexa, ask my buddy to send help” and your emergency contacts will get a notification via email, text, or robocall. You can also place a call through the Echo to anyone with an Alexa device, or the app. Of all the medical-alert-capable devices, the Echo plus Ask My Buddy is one of the least expensive and least intrusive options. However, it offers very minimal protection: It can’t travel with you, and it can’t actually call 911 or reach anyone who is constantly available to dial 911 for you if you ask. We wouldn’t rely on any medical alert alone to save us in an emergency where every second counts, anyway, but this one ranks the lowest in terms of how much it can help in a variety of situations. Keep up with everything Wirecutter from your inbox Wirecutter Weekly: New reviews and picks, sent weekly Deals We Love: The best deals we can find, sent daily Please choose a newsletter to subscribe to. Sign up for Wirecutter's Newsletter Subscribe That wasn't a valid email address. Please try again. Feel free to opt out or contact us at any time. Opt out or contact us at any time. Thanks for subscribing! You'll be hearing from us soon. The research Expand all Why you should trust us Who should get this Can I just use a cell phone, a smart watch, or Alexa/Google Voice? How we picked How we tested What medical alerts are like to use and wear Our pick: GreatCall Lively Mobile Flaws but not dealbreakers Also great: Lifestation At Home Also great: Apple Watch Also great: Amazon Echo with Ask My Buddy What to ask in a test call Why we don’t recommend Life Alert The competition Sources Why you should trust us Medical alert systems (sometimes referred to as personal emergency response systems) have been around for decades. Perhaps the most recognizable name brand, Life Alert, with its ear-worm of a slogan “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up,” was founded in the 1980s. To understand how people use medical alerts, I spoke to George Demiris, PhD, a professor in the department of biomedical informatics and medical education at the University of Washington; Marita Kloseck, PhD, director of the Sam Katz Community Health and Aging Research Unit at Western University in Ontario, Canada; and Majd Alwan, senior vice president of technology and executive director of the LeadingAge Center for Aging Services Technologies. I also spoke to experts who help people select medical alerts: Mindy Renfro, who has worked as a physical therapist and is currently a research assistant professor at the Rural Institute On Disabilities, part of the University of Montana; Richard Caro, who writes about medical alerts at Tech-enhanced Life; Tony Rovere, chair of the Long Island chapter of the National Aging in Place Council and blogger at StuffSeniorsNeed.com; and Melissa Kantor, the executive director of Long Island at Home, which sells medical alerts and aging-in-place services to local seniors. I fall well below the typical age at which people purchase a medical alert, so I approached the research as though I were selecting one for a loved one to use. According to experts, I’m not far off from a typical customer: Many medical alerts are purchased by adult children looking for ways to better support a parent who is aging in place. I spent weeks trying out the devices for myself. I also consulted a family member who already uses one, my great-aunt Kay. Who should get this Pull QuoteOut of the 30 medical alert users in Ontario, Canada, that Kloseck and her colleagues spoke to, 90 percent agreed that the devices helped them maintain their independence. My great-aunt Kay lives alone in Erie, Pennsylvania, near the farm where she and my grandma grew up. She’s had a couple nasty falls in the past five years, but she doesn’t want to live in a nursing home. She prefers her own house and her daily routines. But she wants to know that if she needs to, she’ll be able to call for help quickly. Her medical alert device helps her maintain an independent lifestyle, as it does for many. “I dread just being an ill person who can’t cope with daily looking after yourself,” said one participant in the focus groups researcher Marita Kloseck conducted on what it’s like to live with a medical alert. “The last thing I want to do is lose my independence and be an invalid, it’s my biggest fear.” If you’re living independently and at risk for falling or another medical emergency, a medical alert is one safety measure to consider. Out of the 30 medical alert users in Ontario, Canada, that Kloseck and her colleagues spoke to, 90 percent agreed that the devices helped them maintain their independence. Though many people, like Aunt Kay, turn to medical alert systems after they’ve had a scary incident, the best time to get one is before you need it. If you are having trouble standing up to get out of a chair, said Renfro, it’s a good time to consider one—especially if you live somewhere where neighbors are few and far between, as is the case in Montana, where Renfro works. It’s not just for falls. One interviewee in Kloseck’s focus group reported successfully contacting EMTs via a medical alert after indigestion-like pain for over a day. “I think they must have flew here!” Another said she liked having a medical alert in case someone suspicious showed up at the door. A medical alert might simply relieve anxiety about emergencies. “You hear about people who fall and then can’t get help and they lay there for sometimes hours, but it just scares you when you think that could happen,” noted one participant in Kloseck’s survey on what motivated her to get a medical alert. “Subscribers reported feeling a sense of security or peace of mind,” Kloseck writes. As Aunt Kay puts it: “I feel protected.” Pull QuoteYou should get a medical alert only if you’re committed to wearing and using it. A medical alert should be just one line of defense against any medical emergency, along with working with a physician or physical therapist to monitor or improve your health and eliminating any hazards around the house, said Alwan. No devices we tested worked perfectly, and no medical alert will undo the damage of a fall (or anything else). Though all experts I spoke to agreed that medical alert systems made you safer, it’s hard to tell by how much. Studies suggest that these systems can reduce the amount of time spent on the floor after a fall, but there’s nothing conclusive in the way of peer-reviewed work showing how many lives they save per year. (In fact, experts I spoke to mostly said that their own parents didn’t have medical alerts, preferring to rely instead on check-ins with a friend or neighbor). You should get a medical alert only if you’re committed to wearing and using it. “I don’t even move without it,” Aunt Kay said. It doesn’t do any good sitting atop your dresser, or if you don’t feel comfortable pushing the button in an emergency. They make poor surprise gifts, says Renfro. If you’d like to foot the bill for a device for a loved one, make sure it’s something they want, and involve them in the process of picking it out. Can I just use a cell phone, a smart watch, or Alexa/Google Voice? Today, many of us already carry around a emergency help button: our cell phones. In fact, for some, the ability to dial 911 is the main appeal of having a wireless device at all, according to the Federal Communications Commission. If you’re in the habit of carrying around a phone constantly, it might be a good alternative to a medical alert. There are a few downsides: Most important, your phone might not be water-resistant, or at least might be awkward to take in the shower and hard to reach if you slip. It doesn’t have an option for automatic fall detection, which some medical alerts do. In a nonemergency it can’t reach a call center, so you’ll have to dial family until someone picks up. And it’s not set up by default to automatically share your location, as many medical alerts will with the call center agent. A phone’s battery also doesn’t last as long as a medical alert system’s, if you’re using it to do other things. However, if you know you’ll have trouble remembering to wear a medical alert, or can’t afford $20+ per month, committing to keeping your phone on you at all times is better than nothing. Some companies have apps that provide access to a call center just like medical alerts do, at about a third of the price of a monthly medical alert subscription. However, some can be confusing to use, slow to load, and even sometimes freeze, according to Caro, who tested out three of the apps. They’re also stuck behind a lock screen. There are a few devices that offer medical-alert-like features that are not technically medical alerts, including the Apple Watch and other smart watches, Amazon Alexa devices, and Google Home. Though these devices can offer emergency features, none will be as reliable as a device that has the sole purpose of reaching help. If you know you won’t wear a traditional medical alert, these are better than nothing. How we picked There’s a medical alert for every lifestyle. The most important feature of a medical alert system is that it’s something you are willing to use. Not even the most reliable device will be of use if it’s stashed in a drawer. Comfort and stylishness tended to decrease with range, I found. (A notable exception to this was the Apple Watch, which was the most comfortable and stylish of the bunch, and can go anywhere as long as your iPhone goes too.) We ended up testing a wide range of devices that covered all the possible configurations, but here’s how to figure out which kind works best for you. (Finding a device that you like might involve some trial and error: it took Aunt Kay two tries to find a medical alert that works well for her needs, and some time after that to figure out how to wear the device in a way that’s comfortable.) If you have a living space that’s bigger than a couple rooms, or if you leave your house alone, a mobile medical alert, which can go anywhere there’s a cell signal, will work best to keep you safe. They consist of a unit a little smaller than a deck of cards that you wear around your neck or on a belt clip that houses a GPS system, a speaker, and a microphone. The button calls someone directly from the device, and you speak to them through the unit. The button on most mobile medical alerts dials a call center (though our favorite can also reach 911). Agents are available 24/7, and pick up anywhere between 15 seconds and two minutes after you press the button. They can send 911 to your house, call a friend or family member on your behalf, or simply keep you company while you troubleshoot the situation yourself. They typically have a $20 to $70 monthly fee that includes the cost of the service and the device. (There’s often an activation or equipment fee, too.) Mobile medical alerts work off mobile carriers (e.g., AT&T, Verizon), so you’ll need to check the coverage in your area before making a purchase. They also need to be charged daily, or every few days, depending on the model. If you don’t want to call 911 directly in a minor emergency or if you slip in the shower while you’re naked, mobile medical alerts offer a way to get a variety of help, via a call center. The call center employees are there 24/7, unlike family members who will inevitably be sleeping, in work meetings, or on vacation sometimes. Further, mobile systems that connect to a call center almost always come with an option for automatic fall detection for about $10 extra per month (if you don’t like it, you can turn it off). When the device senses a change in vertical acceleration, it calls for help. If you are totally knocked out, the operator will attempt to figure out your location via the GPS signal from the device. Fall detection is a great idea, in theory, said experts. In practice, it’s prone to registering false positives, or failing to detect actual falls. “It can be embarrassing, it can [disrupt] activities, it can be costly,” said Demiris. (Part of the problem: Stunt actors falling accidentally on purpose are often used to calibrate fall detection.) Even if the device does successfully make a call after you’ve slipped, if you’ve been knocked unconscious, the operator at the call center could still have trouble figuring out where to send help. Most mobile systems have built-in GPS, but the little dot that shows operators where you are is subject to drift around. (Have you ever opened Google Maps on your phone and had the blue dot appear somewhere you aren’t? That’s it.) There are technical improvements that can be made on bare-bones GPS—like a device that checks in with Wi-Fi signals, when possible—but no device will always pinpoint your location accurately. At-home medical alerts are devices that are for use just at home, with a base station that can be connected to cell service or a landline. With just a few exceptions, these consist of a small, light button that can be worn on your wrist or around your neck. Push the button within about 600 feet of the base station (they’re connected via a radio signal), and you can speak to an operator through the base, which looks kind of like an answering machine. These medical alert systems tend to have lower monthly costs, and a device that’s far less bulky and annoying to wear (it’s about the weight and diameter of a quarter). There’s nothing to remember to charge, either. But the limited range can be frustrating, according to participants in a survey conducted by researchers at Jönköping University in Sweden, not just because it limits movement. “In particular, they felt that the lack of new technical innovations in the alarm system, such as the inclusion of a global positioning system (GPS), was a clear indication that their needs were not considered priorities in society,” the researchers write. A homebound system can make you feel homebound, which isn’t useful for people who want to be active outside of the house. Some companies offer affordable devices that can be used to call a loved one or even 911 directly. They do not reach call centers or have their own cell service (the two features are typically paired). These are less expensive because they lack a monthly service fee; rather, they rely on Wi-Fi, a smartphone, or a landline. They range from specialized medical alerts to the Apple Watch. No matter what style of medical alert you want—mobile or traditional, with a call center or not—you have a few options for how you’ll wear the device. Medical alerts can hang around your neck or wrist, or clip to your belt; for any particular device, there are often at least two options. What works best is largely personal preference, though Demiris notes that a device worn around your neck can be easier to make a habit of wearing if you’re used to putting on jewelry in the morning (it’s also necessary if you are using automatic fall detection). Battery life varies broadly for medical alerts, anywhere from just a day to a week. Experts advised getting in the habit of charging the device every night, so we didn’t prioritize long battery life. There’s typically no volume control on medical alert systems, which are about as loud as a cell phone at top volume and on speaker. The advantage is that there’s no way to accidentally turn the volume down. However, if you’re hard of hearing, volume could potentially be an issue. We looked only at devices that came with the option to make monthly payments or required no payments at all, and we discarded any that require you to have an annual contract for the service on the advice of Tony Revere, who blogs at StuffSeniorsNeed.com. You should be able to send the device back without breaking a contract if you try a particular one and realize it—or the whole concept—just isn’t for you. There are various certifications that medical alert equipment and call center equipment can have to make sure they’re up to certain safety standards. For example, companies can pay Underwriter Laboratories to verify their device has certain features. Experts we spoke to disagreed on the level of importance of these certifications, but no one thought that it was a dealbreaker to not have one. And because we did our own testing, we were able to learn firsthand if a system was reliable. Some companies will advertise that their call center is based in the US. Caro, who writes about how to pick a medical alert on Tech-enhanced Life and logged many hours himself testing medical alerts, pointed out to me that all the call centers he’s encountered sounded like they were based in the States. How we tested It’s hard to tell a lot about how easy, effective, and comfortable a medical alert is from descriptions online or from people who may have only used one on their own with no point of comparison, so we decided to try the devices ourselves. I spent several weeks integrating the devices into my life, and then pushing their limits as much as possible. I went through the setup process for each device, which ranged from placing the device in a charging cradle (which all mobile medical alerts use) and following a few verbal instructions, to leafing through a fine-print manual. One device required a traditional landline; I trekked to a coworker’s parents’ apartment on the Upper West Side to use one after it wasn’t compatible with our VoIP system at work. I used each medical alert for at least a day, wearing the mobile medical alerts to work and out with friends, making test calls in all manner of locations. For a while in February, my outfit was consistently punctuated by a low-hanging, blinking device, my kitchen counter and bedside table littered with in-home devices and charging cradles. I made several test calls with each device and compared both response time and the quality of customer service. We prioritized devices that could be worn a variety of ways and made accommodations for people without fine motor skills, like a lanyard with a magnetic clasp that doesn’t need to be looped over a head. Some devices require dexterity not everyone has, like pushing a lanyard through a small hole, or attaching them to a belt clip. What medical alerts are like to use and wear When I wore the Medical Guardian Premium Guardian, a former runner-up pick, out one night with my coworkers, the diamond indicator light blinked red as I ate my food. In the course of chatting about work, I mentioned that I was trying out medical alerts. “Oh that’s what that thing is,” one coworker said. “I thought maybe you had an allergy.” While I was getting used to having a medical alert on me, they still read as a medical device and a little bit strange to the outside world. I was surprised and delighted to learn during this process that, despite the fact that advertising for these devices seems to prey on our fear of mortality and disaster, I didn’t have to be in a life-or-death situation in order to buzz the call centers. The operators are just as happy to help talk through a situation and provide support from afar, and never seemed to be itching to push me into declaring an emergency. The buttons for in-home medical alerts are all tiny and barely noticeable. Mobile medical alerts were the biggest nuisance to wear, in part because of their size, and in part because they tag along for all manner of social situations. They are heavier and can draw considerable attention. I got in the habit of tucking the medical alerts into my shirt, per Aunt Kay’s advice. Some made their presence known even when they were out of sight, chiming to indicate their charge status when I was in a crowded elevator at work, or even speaking up at inopportune times. One day at work, the Premium Guardian verbally announced to me and everyone in a two-cubicle range that its battery was low. I spent a lot of time doing the dreaded thing—pushing the button to ask for help—just to see what would happen. Some devices made chiming sounds, some vibrated, and some noted that they were dialing the call center. The best medical alerts continuously did something as I waited for someone to pick up, as long spaces of silence would leave me wondering if I had accidentally hung up or lost signal. For medical alerts with call centers, someone typically picked up within 30 seconds. Longer than that felt like an eternity, even from the safety of my desk or bed; I wouldn’t want a loved one waiting that long during an emergency. All call centers say more or less the same line when they pick up: “Hello, do you need help?” I usually said no, I was just placing a test call. In one instance, curious if the call center would be willing to help out in a truly minor situation, I asked the operator to call my boyfriend to tell him I was running late to meet him. The operator was happy to oblige. Voice-controlled units like the Amazon Echo don’t require you to wear anything, but work reliably only when you’re in the same room. I set up the Echo in my kitchen, and when the dishwasher was running, even when I was screaming “Hey, Alexa!”—the signal that you’re about to give the device a command—over and over from a room away, it could not hear me. (This is also a pitfall of relying on a device to play music and be able to hear you in an emergency.) I had similar experiences with traditional in-home medical alerts. The range on these devices is technically several hundred feet from the base station, and though the call center operators could hear me yelling from a room away, they had trouble understanding me. (I just moved closer to the base station, but in the event that you fall and they can’t hear you, they’ll follow a preplanned course of action that you decide when you sign up, like calling a family member and then EMTs.) Services that try to use both the button and a base station to communicate were suboptimal. In the case of one hybrid mobile and home device, an operator first tries to talk to you via a stationary home box, and then switches to the wearable if you don’t respond there. After pushing the button at work, I sat in an empty conference room for a full two minutes while, presumably, someone first tried asking my empty apartment if anyone needed help before switching over to the speaker around my neck. During test calls, I asked operators to identify my location. No GPS was consistently accurate, though they were often correct within a couple blocks. This makes backup measures attractive, like the GreatCall Lively Mobile’s Web interface where you can log your typical schedule. Sometimes the GPS was way off. Once, while testing the Bay Alarm Medical GPS Alert System, an operator said that I was at the New York Times building in midtown where the device had lost power, when in fact I’d gone home to Brooklyn. The device lost power downtown, and had only just been recharged when I placed the test call; I suspect that it hadn’t been on long enough to update its location. On another occasion, the GPS on a device wasn’t working at all, and took two phone calls to customer service to fix. I found that operators were rarely able to troubleshoot problems with the device or answer questions about service. Though call center employees were willing and able to help with even minor incidents, they weren’t inclined to make small talk. Once, after noting my location an operator did exclaim that she used to live on my street, and we had a short conversation about the rising rents in Brooklyn. But with few exceptions, the call center people hung up quickly after addressing my requests. Despite being vaguely worried when I started this project about accidentally having EMTs show up at my house, I never once pushed the button on a medical alert unintentionally during testing, including a few occasions when I just threw them in my purse. If you do accidentally hit the button, chances are you will be connected to a call center, and you can just clarify what happened with an operator. (Medical alerts make noise when they are placing a call, so a butt-dial will not go unnoticed.) Most medical alerts do not call 911 directly, and those that do require a more deliberate, prolonged push to reach emergency services. At first I skipped providing my emergency contacts, in part because I didn’t expect to be in immediate danger, but also because it was such an easy step to overlook. In all but one case, it was possible to get through the activation process without providing them, which you typically have to do over email, fax, or via snail mail to ensure that the contact information is entered correctly. Only one model, the GreatCall Lively Mobile, allowed you to enter them in an online interface. Our pick: GreatCall Lively Mobile The GreatCall Lively Mobile is intuitive to use, and has a plain design that won’t draw too much attention. Our pick GreatCall Lively Mobile The best medical alert system Our favorite medical alert system is comfortable to wear around your neck or on a belt clip. We found that the call center picks up faster than the competition, typically 15 seconds after you push the button. $40 from GreatCall $34 from Walmart The GreatCall Lively Mobile was one of the easiest mobile medical alerts to wear and use, and costs less than any other medical alert of its kind that we considered, with service starting at $20 per month, with one-time fees totaling $80. The rectangular silver and black (or gold and black) design draws minimal attention, and the call center consistently picks up quickly—up to eight times as fast as others. The battery life is 24 hours, according to the company, among the the shortest we considered, though I found it lasted nearly twice that long with minimal use. The device is a little smaller and lighter than a deck of cards. One big button in the middle dials the call center or—if you hold it down—911. A small button on the back turns it on and off. A small battery-indicator light changes colors when the Lively is low on charge, but it doesn’t draw a ton of attention to itself. When the Lively shuts off from low battery, it announces that it’s doing so. (It was loud enough to wake me up at 4 a.m. one day, a good feature if you’ve forgotten to charge it and have missed the battery light.) The Lively Mobile can go anywhere there’s Verizon cell service, including your shower, as it’s waterproof. In separate tests, we’ve found Verizon to be the most reliable network, though it doesn’t cover every part of the country. Check here to see if your area is covered. The Lively Mobile is one of the only medical alerts we looked at that has the option to call either a call center, or—by holding down the button—911 directly. The speaker and microphone in the device provide sound quality that’s better than that of many other devices we considered. If you dial an agent from the Lively, they’ll typically pick up about 15 seconds after you push the button; other devices left us hanging for what felt like forever. If you are lost, or unable to speak, the agent can look at a GPS signal and a list of places you frequent to help identify your location. The Lively Mobile is the only device that has an easy-to-use online interface where you can store emergency contact information. With all other devices, you have to email or snail mail your emergency contact information (this ensures accuracy compared with speaking the information over the phone). GreatCall offers the most affordable basic service packages of all the mobile medical alerts we tested, at $20. Fall detection costs an extra $15. GreatCall also has a middle tier, for $25, with access to doctors via the device (though they emphasize that this feature should not be used in an emergency), and allows family and friends to tell when you leave home or return via the GreatCall Link app. The first tier of service should work well for most people, though if the idea of being able to loosely track a loved one’s movements appeals to you, or if you want the extra security of (somewhat unreliable) fall detection, consider upgrading. The Lively Mobile has a separate on-off button, which means it’s impossible to accidentally turn it off when you’re calling for help. The lanyard is soft and black, shorter than those of much of the competition, and has a magnetic clasp so you don’t need to be able to lift your arms above your head to put it on or mess with a complicated closure. (There’s also an option to wear the device on a belt clip). The instruction booklet for the Lively Mobile is easy to read. This is a small point, but it was much better than the thick, tiny-print instruction books that some of the competition had. GreatCall has been around since 2006—the company is best known for making Jitterbug flip phones—and debuted the Lively Mobile in mid-2016. The device is an upgraded version of GreatCall’s previous mobile medical alert, the Splash, which garnered positive reviews. Medical alert reviewer Caro praised the Splash for the call center’s fast response time, ability to call 911 directly, and easy online interface, all qualities that the Lively shares. Flaws but not dealbreakers No medical alert is actively enjoyable to wear, and the Lively Mobile is no exception. It will likely take some time to get used to having the device around your neck. On the Lively, a white light flashes consistently to indicate that it’s in an area with service. Though this was less intrusive than the more colorful lights on some other devices, it could still be annoying; there were no mobile medical alerts without lights. The length of the Lively Mobile’s lanyard is not adjustable. Though I found the relatively short lanyard to be easier to wear than the competition’s, this might not be the case for everyone. Even though the lanyard can be easily swapped out, most traditional lanyards (which have a clasp that attaches to a badge) will be a little awkward. If you want a different lanyard with a specific length, you’ll need a little DIY savvy. If your area is not covered by Verizon, the Lively Mobile won’t work for you. Check your coverage here. Another flaw that all medical alerts share: the GPS signal can be unreliable. However, the Lively helps skirt this by prompting you to enter information into an online database (from a computer or a smartphone app) about your schedule and where you go during your days so the call center staff have something to fall back on. It’s the only medical alert that has this feature. Of all the medical alerts we tested, the Lively Mobile has one of the shortest advertised battery lives: 24 hours, as opposed to 36 hours or even several days. I found the battery lasted over 50 hours with minimal use, though I wouldn’t want a loved one counting on it working for that long on a single charge. Experts recommend getting in the habit of charging your medical alert nightly, so that you don’t have to think about it. If this will be hard for you, consider an in-home medical alert, which doesn’t need to be charged. Also great: Lifestation At Home The LifeStation At Home system has a small button and a base station. Also great Lifestation At Home An at-home medical alert system Call for help from a room or two in your house with this less-expensive and easier-to-wear system, available in versions that connect to a landline or cell service. $26 from LifeStation If you just need a medical alert to cover you in a couple rooms of your house, consider the Life Station At Home system, which is about $30 per month (there’s no activation fee). Like all in-home medical alert systems, it consists of a small button that you can wear around your neck or on your wrist that wirelessly connects to an answering-machine-like base station that lets you speak to a call center agent (there’s no option to dial 911 directly). Though it can’t leave your house, and you can’t speak through the button, it’s easier to wear than our top picks. There’s no charging required; the button’s battery lasts about three years. Home medical alert systems are all very similar, but Life Station’s is a little less expensive than other options we looked at, and didn’t give us any trouble during testing. The main perk of an at-home system is that the device is much easier to wear than those in mobile systems: The Life Station button is about the weight and diameter of a quarter, and just a little thicker. In comparison, our main pick and runner-up are just a little smaller and lighter than a deck of cards. If you don’t need a medical alert that you can leave the house with, are mostly concerned about slipping in one room—the bathroom, for example—or know that you just won’t wear anything but the least-intrusive device, the Life Station At Home might be a good option. The major downside of this or any at-home system is that its range is incredibly limited, even if you’re just using it in your home. The range of this device is several hundred feet—that is, the button can still communicate with the base station if you are on the other side of a small house. Though it’s difficult to communicate through the base station if you’re even one room away, you can choose at the time of setup what course of action the call center should take if you push the button and they don’t hear anything. Also great: Apple Watch A medical ID screen has a few details for paramedics. Apple Watch can dial 911 at the push of a button. The Emergency SOS feature dials 911 and texts your emergency contacts. Press the button on the right once to get this screen, or hold down to activate the SOS feature immediately. A medical ID screen has a few details for paramedics. Apple Watch can dial 911 at the push of a button. 1 of 3 Also great Apple Watch Series 3 (aluminum) No call center and no contract Bare-bones emergency features, but the most stylish. $330 from Apple Apple Watch Series 3 has basic emergency functions compared with most medical alerts we looked at, and requires a little tech savvy to use. Out of everything we tested, it’s the only wearable device that’s stylish and doesn’t look at all like a medical device. (We tested the Series 2 but it is no longer available). You will need to have an iPhone for the watch to work, but if you’re already paying for that service and you are comfortable with navigating Apple services, the watch may be relatively affordable—it currently costs $330, which will buy you less than 10 months of service with a typical mobile medical alert. (We recommend the version without cellular service; more on that in a minute.) The SOS feature (which was introduced on the Series 2 model) allows users to dial 911 by pushing and holding down the button on the side of the watch, and can automatically text up to three emergency contacts and give them your location when you do so. Apple Watch hasn’t had emergency features long enough for our experts to evaluate its usefulness as a medical alert, though they agreed it could be useful. Apple Watch’s battery lasts 18 hours with some use. You can speak to a 911 responder directly through the watch, or if it’s a nonemergency, you can dial a friend or family member through the watch verbally, by saying (for example), “Siri, call [name].” The sound quality of Apple Watch is better than any medical alert we considered. There are a variety of bands to choose from (some costing hundreds of dollars themselves, like a Hermes band), making Apple Watch Series 2 the most customizable of all the devices we looked at. Aside from the limited functionality, the major downside of Apple Watch is that you have to be within Bluetooth range or connected to the same Wi-Fi network as your phone for it to place a call. This means that you can’t necessarily just set your phone down in your house, wander away from it, and know that your Apple Watch is going to keep you safe in the event of an emergency (one of the key advantages of a true mobile medical alert system). There is an LTE version of the Series 3 that allows you to place calls without being in range of your phone, but we can’t recommend it. Preliminary reviews have noted connectivity and battery issues with the LTE version, plus you’ll need to pay about $10 a month for the Watch to have its own service. We plan to test the service for ourselves, and we’ll keep an eye out for improvements. I found that navigating the tiny screen on the watch could be challenging, though this was mostly an issue for using functions other than the SOS feature. (However, if you buy Apple Watch, you’ll likely want it to work for other things, too.) If you find yourself fairly comfortable with most Apple devices, and okay with the size of newspaper print (the font can be enlarged on some apps, like text messaging, but not all), scrolling through apps on your wrist shouldn’t be too much of an adjustment. Also great: Amazon Echo with Ask My Buddy At your verbal request, the Amazon Echo can send an alert to loved ones. Budget pick Ask My Buddy A bare-bones option for home A voice-controlled app that can give you added peace of mind, but can’t call 911. Buy from Ask My Buddy Amazon Echo Our favorite voice-controlled device It’s relatively easy to set up Ask My Buddy on the Amazon Echo, which can also play music, tell you the weather, and control smart devices. $180 from Amazon Buy from Amazon Buy from Amazon Buy from Amazon If you don’t carry your phone around in your home, won’t remember or want to wear even a small button, would have trouble using a button in an emergency but can vocalize and enunciate pretty clearly, or just want another layer of security, consider using Ask My Buddy paired with the Amazon Echo (you’ll need to have a smartphone or tablet to use it). When you say, “Alexa, ask my buddy for help” the service will send a text, email, and phone call to a list of contacts to let them know they should check in. You can also place a phone call through the Echo to anyone who has the free Amazon Alexa app on their phone. Though the Echo may be the easiest and least expensive device to fit into your lifestyle, this setup would not be helpful at all in emergencies, and only marginally helpful in nonemergencies. Still, it would be better than nothing. Pull Quote I wouldn’t want a loved one of mine counting on any medical alert alone to keep them safe, but especially not the Echo. There’s nothing to remember to wear or charge, and the device doesn’t look anything like a medical device because it’s not. You’ll get all the other capabilities of the Echo (here’s our full guide), and at $180, it costs less than four months’ worth of service with a traditional medical alert company. Unlike other services, this one can’t connect you to 911 directly or via a call center or confirm that someone received your request. The range is small; the feature works reliably only if you’re in the same room as the Echo (that said, multiple Echos or Echo Dots can all be linked together to cover many rooms or a larger home). As such, Ask My Buddy should be treated only as an additional tool for a little added peace of mind in addition to thoughtful design of a home around the person using it. I wouldn’t want a loved one of mine counting on any medical alert alone to keep them safe, but especially not the Echo. We think that the Echo will be the best device to pair with Ask My Buddy for most people, though it also works with other Amazon Alexa devices and Google Home (our full guide). The Echo indicates that it heard you with a ring of light at the top of the device, and it’s taller than Google Home (which has a slanted face with indicator lights) and other Alexa options, making it easier to see from across the room. Ask My Buddy was a little easier to set up and use on the Echo than on Google Home (you’ll still need a little app savvy, or have someone around who does, as you’ll need to connect the device to a smartphone and Wi-Fi). The range on any voice-controlled device is smaller than that of a home medical alert system with a base station. When I tried screaming “Hey, Alexa” over and over from a room away while the dishwasher was running, it didn’t pick up my voice. The sound quality on either end of the phone call placed through the Alexa wasn’t as good as it is on a traditional medical alert device. Though you may run into range problems with a home medical alert with a base station, it’s easier to get someone on the line (you just push a button), at which point, they’d at least know that you needed help even if you were unable to communicate; the same can’t be said of a call that’s not picked up or a text that goes unseen. Another concern we have about Ask My Buddy: It’s a free app run by volunteers. There’s no guarantee that it’s sticking around, and you can’t contact people otherwise through an Echo. There’s an email to send issues and questions to, but you can’t get in touch with a representative right away if you run into a problem with its service. Amazon does have a customer service line to help with Echo setup. Amazon’s Echo Connect, launched in September 2017, is the first Echo device with phone calling capabilities (rather than just Echo-to-Echo intercom communication). You can use it to call any landline, including 911 calls. It also has built-in speakerphone and caller ID features. We are looking into the possibility of using the Echo Connect as a medical alert system, and if we think it’s a better option than an Echo paired with Ask My Buddy we’ll update this section with our thoughts. What to ask in a test call For medical alerts that come with a monitoring service, experts recommend pushing the button on your medical alert at least once a month to confirm that it’s working well. This step is especially important when you first start using your medical alert. Pushing the button should feel like second nature during a true emergency. One participant in the University of Western Ontario focus group recalled forgetting about the device during a heart attack: “The button didn’t even come into my mind. All I knew I was in trouble.” Plus, you need to make sure that the device works the way you think it does. Aunt Kay fell outside her house, and, thinking she had a mobile system, pushed the button to call for help to no avail. Though she was able to crawl to her car to retrieve her cell phone, the incident left her and our family shaken. It’s scary to find out you don’t have help at the ready when you think you do. Through expert advice, and some trial and error, I learned that there are a few things that I’d want my loved ones doing during a test call to ensure that their device is working properly. Confirm that the company has your correct home address on file. In particular, if the device was shipped to another location, this could be wrong—and cause problems if you fall and say you’re at home. Ask the operator if they can tell you where you are right now. If they are off by more than a block, call customer service. In one case during my tests, the GPS wasn’t working at all, a problem that might not have come to light if I hadn’t asked about it. Again, in another case, when I called from my home in Brooklyn, the operator informed me that I was at the New York Times Building, in midtown Manhattan. If you think you have automatic fall detection, confirm that this is the case with the operator. Many devices will announce that they are activating automatic fall detection when you first plug them in, even if this feature isn’t something you are paying for and therefore won’t be able to use. If you do have automatic fall detection, do a test fall by dropping the device on the ground. I also learned that the agents at the call center are typically not able to help you troubleshoot any issues that the device itself is having. If you learn during a test call that anything is amiss, you’ll need to hang up and call customer service. Why we don’t recommend Life Alert We quickly eliminated Life Alert—the brand so ubiquitous it’s name is often used to describe medical alerts in general—from the running. The company requires users to sign a 36-month contract that can be broken only if you go into 24/7 care or die. That’s a dealbreaker because it’s hard to know if a particular medical alert (or any medical alert at all) is something you’ll use until you try it out. The ability to cancel your service with minimal penalties is key to a good medical alert. Beyond that, Life Alert’s marketing is aggressive, making perusing its products annoying at best. There are outsized claims about its products’ lifesaving abilities on the website, but minimal information on the devices themselves. When I called the customer service line for more information, a representative immediately asked for my address. As I asked questions about the service, a rep encouraged me to give my mom “the gift of life”—meaning its product—for Mother’s Day. The competition Our former runner-up pick, the Medical Guardian Premium Guardian, is no longer available. Medical Guardian now offers a different device, the Active Guardian instead. We tried this device, and don’t like it enough to recommend it as a pick, though if you don’t care about looks and are better covered in your area by AT&T service (as opposed to Verizon) it’s a fine choice.

      .

    2. Pushing the button should feel like second nature during a true emergency. One participant in the University of Western Ontario focus group recalled forgetting about the device during a heart attack: “The button didn’t even come into my mind. All I knew I was in trouble.”

      .

    3. Sometimes the GPS was way off.

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    4. Services that try to use both the button and a base station to communicate were suboptimal. In the case of one hybrid mobile and home device, an operator first tries to talk to you via a stationary home box, and then switches to the wearable if you don’t respond there. After pushing the button at work, I sat in an empty conference room for a full two minutes while, presumably, someone first tried asking my empty apartment if anyone needed help before switching over to the speaker around my neck.

      .

    5. Mobile medical alerts were the biggest nuisance to wear, in part because of their size, and in part because they tag along for all manner of social situations. They are heavier and can draw considerable attention. I got in the habit of tucking the medical alerts into my shirt, per Aunt Kay’s advice. Some made their presence known even when they were out of sight, chiming to indicate their charge status when I was in a crowded elevator at work, or even speaking up at inopportune times. One day at work, the Premium Guardian verbally announced to me and everyone in a two-cubicle range that its battery was low.

      .

    6. While I was getting used to having a medical alert on me, they still read as a medical device and a little bit strange to the outside world.

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    7. It’s hard to tell a lot about how easy, effective, and comfortable a medical alert is from descriptions online or from people who may have only used one on their own with no point of comparison, so we decided to try the devices ourselves. I spent several weeks integrating the devices into my life, and then pushing their limits as much as possible.

      yes, it's hard to know the quality from just reading reviews

    8. The water-resistant GreatCall Lively Mobile can dial a call center or 911 directly (the ability to do both is a rare feature) from anywhere, and it’s easier to wear than the competition: It can go on a lanyard (with a magnetic clasp) that’s long enough to slide over your head, or on a belt clip. The silver box and plain white indicator light are more understated than the competition, and GreatCall offers the lowest-cost month-to-month plan of anything we looked at. The battery lasts 24 hours, according to GreatCall, though we found it could go up to 50 hours with minimal use. The advertised battery life is on the low end of the models we tested, but our experts recommended getting in the habit of charging your medical alert every day anyway. The GreatCall Lively Mobile works anywhere there’s Verizon cell service, which we’ve found to be the most reliable network.

      summary of the qualities of GreatCall Lively Mobile

    1. Hack Day: Fri 8 June

      While sitting here at Fort Mason at the iannotate Hack Day 2018, I am reminding myself how to use the hypothes.is api.

    1. Patti Owen Patti started working on the Berkeley campus in 1975 while her husband pursued his PhD. Her first position was in the Academic Personnel Office, where she worked for 3 ½ years. She followed her husband to Paris while he did his doctoral research. Upon her return she worked in the Engineering Dean's Office for 10 years and at UC Office of the President for almost 5 years. She returned to campus in 1993 to serve as head of the Academic Personnel Office. At the time of retirement in 2009, she was the Assistant Vice Provost for Academic Personnel.She enjoys traveling with her husband, especially to France where she spent her junior year abroad. She is an avid quilter and serves as a volunteer for Stitchin' for Kids. She currently serves as Chair of the Retirement Center Advisory Board.

      Patti Owen was the head of APO when I worked on Biobibs.

  13. Apr 2018
    1. On or before May 6, cast your vote in the Narthex for ONE book that you hope to read over the summer by placing a marble in the jar for the book of your choice. The Adult Formation Committee will tally the votes on May 14th and announce them in the Pathfinder and at the services that Sunday.

      timing for vote

    1. Upgrade pick Dell P2415Q A great 4K 24-inch monitor If you want a 24-inch monitor to edit 4K photos and video at their native resolution, or to watch higher-resolution television and movies, the Dell P2415Q is a solid choice. $430* from Dell $460 from Walmart $627 from Amazon €434 from Amazon ¥3,336 from Amazon €436 from Amazon €436 from Amazon £367 from Amazon INR 43,039.00 from Amazon €385 from Amazon ¥55,300 from Amazon *At the time of publishing, the price was $460. If you want a 4K monitor, we recommend the Dell P2415Q. Although it typically costs around $100 more than our top pick, the P2415Q has an extremely accurate 3840×2160-pixel IPS display, which means that it can show sharper, more detailed images than our 1920×1200 recommendations when connected to a computer that supports the resolution. The P2415Q has HDMI and DisplayPort connections plus four USB 3.0 ports—one fewer than the Dell U2415. Its stand is just as adjustable as our main pick’s, but the thicker bezel around its screen makes it look chunky by comparison. It comes with the same dead-pixel policy and warranty as the U2415.

      4K upgrade pick

  14. Mar 2018
    1. What does Zuckerberg know about user's privacy. He does not believe in the concept[1][2].I remember when this chart[3] first made the rounds. If this didn't convince people that facebook is evil. I don't know what will[1] https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2010/jan/11/facebook-...[2] https://www.cnbc.com/2018/03/21/facebook-ceo-mark-zuckerberg...[3] http://mattmckeon.com/facebook-privacy/

      Striking comment about how Mark Zuckerberg has had such a terrible record on privacy. Why believe him now?

  15. Feb 2018
    1. How to submit a package to PyPI

      The new PyPI repo has made some of the instructions in this handy tutorial out-of-date. See Migrating to PyPI.org — Python Packaging User Guide

    1. With our page(s) selected, we need to copy them to the clipboard, either by selecting Edit > Copy from the Menu Bar, or by using the keyboard shortcut Command-C. Next, we’ll tell Preview to make a new PDF document from the page(s) we just copied, which can be accomplished by selecting File > New From Clipboard in the Menu Bar or by using the keyboard shortcut Command-N.

      How to create a new PDF from copied extracts from old PDF using macOS Preview

    1. SUMMER BOOK NOMINATIONS Nominate a book for our parish-wide summer book group! Find the nomination slips and the jar on the Cedar side counter in the Narthex, and in the chapel (for the 7:30 service goers).

      Time to nominate a book for the summer reading group at All Souls Parish.

    1. There are two ways to expand any window on your Mac. One trick, which came around when OS X Yosemite did, is to Option-Click the green button itself. That’s all well and good, but it does require a little extra thinking, and if you accidentally hit the green button without the Option key, you’ll get a full screen window. Not good. The best way, in my opinion, to zoom your windows out to fit the size of the content within them is to double click on the title bar.

      How to zoom out window on macOS

    1. First, as mass immigration increases diversity, it reduces social cohesion and civic trust. This is not a universal law, as the economics writer Noah Smith has pointed out; there are counter-examples and ways to resist the trend. However, it is a finding that strongly comports with the real-world experience of Europe and America, where as cultural diversity has increased so has social distrust, elite-populist conflict, and the racial, religious and generational polarization of political parties.

      confusing causation with correlation

    1. On March 22, 2017, during the House Intelligence Committee's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections, Nunes held a press conference to announce that he had received information that communications of members of Trump's transition team had been "incidentally collected" by the intelligence community. The communications had been obtained legally during foreign intelligence surveillance, but were not related to Russia. He added that the information was "widely disseminated" in the intelligence community, and later clarified that Trump associates were not necessarily participants in the intercepted conversations.[62] Nunes was widely criticized for sharing this information with the media and the president before briefing his colleagues on the committee.[63] According to Nunes, the intercepted communications came in November, December and January – after Trump won the election but before he was sworn in as president.[64] Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the committee, and House Democratic leadership called on Nunes to recuse himself from the investigation.[6] He also received criticism from Republican Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham.[65] The latter compared Nunes's actions to those of the comically incompetent fictional character Inspector Clouseau.[66]

      Nunes incident from March 2017

    1. Let it Go I don't wanna cry, cry cry cry, oh Come on baby try and let it go, let it go When the time has come for us to part Will you hold my hand? Sorrow dancing circles round my heart Will you understand? I don't wanna cry, cry, cry, cry, oh Come on baby try and let it go, let it go Princes, kings and noble bravery Fairy tears will fall Let me rock you, walk you to the gate Watch you run away

      lyrics for "Let it Go" from the album Echo in the Valley

  16. Jan 2018
    1. Let it Go I don't wanna cry, cry cry cry, oh Come on baby try and let it go, let it go When the time has come for us to part Will you hold my hand? Sorrow dancing circles round my heart Will you understand? I don't wanna cry, cry, cry, cry, oh Come on baby try and let it go, let it go Princes, kings and noble bravery Fairy tears will fall Let me rock you, walk you to the gate Watch you run away

      lyrics for "Let it Go" from the album Echoes in the Valley

    1. Next, we're going to tell Leanpub we want this file in the book. To do this, we add the filename of the new file to the Book.txt file. The Book.txt file is just a list of the files in your book, in the order you want them included.

      Book.txt is the master file for leanpub book generation

    1. Berkeley Location (formerly Alameda County Computer Resource Center) 620 Page St, Berkeley, CA, 94710

      Berkeley location of the CTRC

    1. How do I clean the data off my computer/hard drive? We offer drive wiping service for $10 per drive. Do nothing. This allows us to simply reformat the drive and use it in a rebuilt computer. Format the drive yourself. The disk will remain in working order and we will be able to format it a second time and use it in a rebuilt computer. Pay us to either wipe or degauss your drive. For a fee (see above), we will completely wipe your hard drive and install a fresh operating system, so your hard drive can be reused. If the hard drive cannot be wiped, it will be degaussed. Degaussing a drive renders it useless. After we degauss your hard drive, we cannot use it in a rebuilt computer.

      data wiping/drive degaussing service

    1. If people would do that, people who do not want their local stuff to be publicly available, it just ends it. I mean, you could have all your ports open. You could do anything you wanted, if you simply set TTLs to one. I've never seen it done, and I've never seen it talked about or mentioned.

      Setting TTL to 1s for packets as a way to keep local network activity local is an interesting idea.

    1. Low-cost iPad - Early 2018? In 2017, Apple introduced a new 5th-generation 9.7-inch iPad with the lowest price we've seen yet - $329 for the 32GB model. Though not as thin as the iPad Pro, and missing features like Apple Pencil support and ProMotion display technology, the iPad has an A9 processor and is a capable, powerful device. Rumors suggest Apple could introduce an even lower-cost iPad in 2018, with a price tag that starts at $259. That would allow Apple to better compete in the lower cost tablet market. This rumor comes from DigiTimes, though, a source that's not always entirely reliable, so it's not yet clear if Apple does indeed have an even more affordable iPad in the works. If there is a new iPad coming, it could be introduced in early 2018, a year after the March 2018 debut of the fifth-generation iPad.

      Maybe a low-cost iPad will be coming in early 2018

    1. Sounding the Liturgical Year, with Jamie Apgar Meeting at 10:10 am on January 7, 14, 21, and February 4 Living in that entity called “the West,” we have received from European precedents—often unknowingly—peculiar ways of experiencing and thinking about music. These idealizations can tend not just toward the universal but even toward the socially destructive: music is essentially emotional or more broadly communicative, its own “language,” a domain in which great artists create out of inspiration and ennoble listeners, even facilitate spiritual transcendence, through works of genius. Such notions are variously problematic and contingent, particularly in universalized formulations: mostly unexamined until the ascendance of post-colonial critique were the power imbalances by which the model of the inspired genius or easy equivalences between music and language have served to oppress particular groups. Just as importantly, these ideas have served to occlude other perspectives that support different accounts of the political and cultural work that music performs. Until the last few decades, for instance, the social functions of music lay largely at the periphery of scholarly and popular discourse. This course will seek not so much to tear down the core aesthetics of Western artistic cultures as to contemplate them alongside other modes of engaging music, to situate music within the broader category of sound, and to consider both the benefits and the drawbacks of our many spiritual, social, and sensual experiences of music. It will do so with reference to the principal context in which music is used in the Episcopal Church: the liturgy. Through scripture, historical examples, discussions, and perhaps even a little of our own music-making, we will explore not just what music has done but also what we might think we need it to do.

      I'm looking forward to learning about the role of music from non-Western traditions in liturgy.

    1. Kernel Available for: macOS High Sierra 10.13.1 Impact: An application may be able to read kernel memory (Meltdown) Description: Systems with microprocessors utilizing speculative execution and indirect branch prediction may allow unauthorized disclosure of information to an attacker with local user access via a side-channel analysis of the data cache. CVE-2017-5754: Jann Horn of Google Project Zero; Moritz Lipp of Graz University of Technology; Michael Schwarz of Graz University of Technology; Daniel Gruss of Graz University of Technology; Thomas Prescher of Cyberus Technology GmbH; Werner Haas of Cyberus Technology GmbH; Stefan Mangard of Graz University of Technology; Paul Kocher; Daniel Genkin of University of Pennsylvania and University of Maryland; Yuval Yarom of University of Adelaide and Data61; and Mike Hamburg of Rambus (Cryptography Research Division) Entry updated January 5, 2018

      The apple memo was updated to indicate that the 2017-002 Sierra update does not include a fix for Meltdown. See also https://twitter.com/reneritchie/status/949413107062976512

  17. Nov 2017
    1. Eventbrite Public Dashboard [Diya Das] Eventbrite doesn’t have a public-facing dashboard to share high-level registration/check-in information (for promoting events), but they do have an API. Interested? Add your name here:

      interesting!

    1. Conversations on Gender: Science, Culture, and Incarnation “It’s a girl.”  “It’s a boy.”  From the day we are born, gender is spoken over us.  We sort our diverse bodies into the “female” bin or the “male” bin.  More often, we are sorted.  We are told what it means to be a woman, to be a man.  These names, and all the baggage they carry, follow us from the bathroom to the boardroom, shaping the ways others see us, the ways others treat us, the ways we see ourselves.  We open the Bible, and there we find sex and gender on the very first page: “male and female he created them.”  This thread winds through the pages of Scripture, from the patriarchs and matriarchs to the “her” and “him” of the Song of Solomon to the audacious women and grumbling men of the Gospels.  We hear the meaning of manhood and womanhood not only from friends and family, from TV and movies, but also from the pulpit.  Sex and gender permeate our lives, coloring every aspect.  And yet, we live in a historical moment where we’re increasingly willing to question these categories, to examine this lens through which we’ve seen the world. We at All Souls come from a variety of places when it comes to gender.  Some of us grew up in a world divided into slacks and skirts.  Other of us grew up in beige nurseries with a choice of Tonka Trucks and Barbies.  Some of us find the phrase “male and female” as familiar and reassuring as the night and the day, as the changing of the seasons.  For others, the words “male and female” give us a sinking feeling in our gut, as we wonder where we fit in.  For some of us, gender roles fit like a glove from day one, and have never really felt constricting.  Others of us have had to blaze our own trails, violating societies’ expectations with our gender identities, the genders of partners, our choice of careers, our choice of dress, or even just our personalities.  Many of us across the board have chosen to wear preferred pronouns on our name tags, in recognition that a person’s physical appearance might not tell you everything about their identity. As disciples, we ask the question: what does it mean to follow Jesus in our diverse bodies, with our diverse identities, in conversation with these sacred texts, in the midst of this society?  How do we think Christianly about gender?  Join myself, Dr. Sarah Bakker Kellogg, and Dr. Scott MacDougall during Formation Hour on Nov. 26, Dec. 3, and Dec. 10, as we explore sex and gender through the lenses of biology, anthropology, and theology.  We’ll discuss what these disciplines have to say on the topic, swap perspectives and experiences, and wrestle together with what it means to live out our baptisms in a gendered world. – Rob Johnson

      Excellent class at All Souls

    2. MAJOR DETOURS THIS SUNDAY MORNING!! This Sunday, November 20th, is the Berkeley Half Marathon. The good news is that many All Solesians will be out racing together! In addition, many of our regular routes to church will be more complicated because of the road closures. Emily Hansen Curran is preaching at All Souls for the first time this Sunday, so make sure you plan ahead to make it in time! Here are directions for how to make your way to church with ease from any direction. Most of them should be smooth, but it would be wise to give yourself an extra 10-15 minutes in case you hit other race day traffic. A full map of closures is available here. Folks coming to the 7:30 service shouldn’t be affected. From the North: Your best bet is to stay north of Marin, avoid the circle, and climb all the way up to Spruce. Figure in an extra 10 minutes. Details: Off of 80, take the Buchanan St. exit. Continue up Marin Left on Peralta Right on Thousand Oaks Left on Arlington Right on Santa Barbara Left on Northampton Right on Spruce, and cruise on down to All Souls! From South Berkeley: Stay south of Channing, take Ashby up to Piedmont, looping above campus. Figure in an extra 10 minutes. Details: Staying south of Channing, go to Ashby. Take Ashby east Turn left on College Turn right on Dwight Turn left on Piedmont, continue onto Gayley Continue straight onto La Loma Turn left onto Le Conte Turn right on Euclid Turn left on Cedar, and cruise on down to All Souls!  From the East and South Take Tunnel Road to Claremont, stay above campus. Figure in an extra 10 minutes. Details: Take 24 to Tunnel Road Continue onto Ashby Turn right on Claremont Turn left on Derby Turn right on Warring Continue onto Piedmont, then continue onto Gayley Continue straight onto La Loma Turn left onto Le Conte Turn right on Euclid Turn left on Cedar, and cruise on down to All Souls! From the West: Get off at Ashby, and loop above campus. Figure in an extra 10 minutes. Details: From 80, take the Ashby exit Continue east on Ashby Turn left on College Turn right on Dwight Turn left on Piedmont, continue onto Gayley Continue straight onto La Loma Turn left onto Le Conte Turn right on Euclid Turn left on Cedar, and cruise on down to All Souls! From Central Berkeley [South of Marin, Santa Fe and Page, East of 4th Street, North of Bancroft/Channing, and West of Shattuck/Telegraph]To get to the 9am service, your best bet is to take side streets (avoid University!) and park on the west side of the race course, near the corner of Cedar & Shattuck and then walk the couple of blocks up to All Souls. Bonus points if you see an All Solesian running while you cross Shattuck! If you need a ride up from the east side of Shattuck, let Liz or Emily know and we’ll arrange for someone to pick you up there. You may get lucky crossing Shattuck at University and then continuing to Oxford, though it will likely be quite slow as they let cars across intermittently. University should be fully open at Shattuck after 9:45 am.

      How to get to All Souls Parish during the Berkeley Half Marathon

    3. From the Stewardship Team

      report from stewardship team

    4. WOULD YOU BE A GOOD STEPHEN MINISTER? Now is the time of year to consider this question.  Stephen Ministers are trained lay people who provide confidential, one-to-one support to others who are going through a crisis or a rough patch in their lives.  To learn more about becoming a Stephen Minister, please attend a 20-minute informational session on Sunday, November 19, at 10:20 a.m. in Liz’s office. Or contact Tom Reilly at 510-528-7832 or one of the other Stephen Leaders:  Nancy Austin, Judith Lothrop, or David Wight. For more information, here’s a link to an informative video on Stephen Ministry from PBS’s Religion and Ethics Newsweekly. And here is a link to a series of interviews with people who have received care from Stephen Ministers.

      Seeking Stephen Minister trainees for next year

    5. The Interfaith Vigil at the West County Detention Center

      "The Interfaith Vigil at the West County Detention Center" by Sarah Bakker Kellogg

    1. In 2006, PC World rated the Zip drive as the 15th worst technology product of all time.[9] Nonetheless, in 2007, PC World rated the Zip drive as the 23rd best technology product of all time[10] despite its known problems.

      Weird

    1. iPad iPad Pro ($650) — Best Buy is the king of the iPad Pro deals, marking the 10.5-inch version down to $525 on Black Friday. Target isn't far behind, however; it's selling the device for $530. Finally, you can get $150 off any iPad model from T-Mobile if you purchase a 6GB or higher cellular plan with a leasing agreement.   iPad ($330) — iPad deals are numerous this holiday season, but Walmart edges out its competitors with a $249 price tag on the iPad 5th Generation. Target and Best Buy are both charging just $0.99 more. If you're feeling nostalgic, check out Groupon's markdowns of the iPad 3 (to $160 from $400) and iPad 4 (to $200 from $500), and Newegg's sales on the refurbished iPad 4 ($150). And you can get $100 off an iPad (or any tablet) from Sprint, if you purchase an unlimited data plan.  iPad Mini 4 ($400) — Best Buy's price of $275 is insane, and can't be beaten. T-Mobile's offer also applies to the iPad Mini 4. 

      iPad deals for Black Friday 2017

    1. Despite their differences, “Alias Grace” has the same timeliness that helped win “The Handmaid’s Tale” the Emmy for best drama. And it likely won’t be the last Atwood adaptation we get. Darren Aronofsky has announced plans to make a series from the MaddAddam trilogy, which looked like it might land at HBO. That deal fell through, but Aronofsky said he wasn’t giving up. And last year, MGM Television bought the rights to Atwood’s novel “The Heart Goes Last,” according to Deadline.

      reading the tea leaves for the future of the MaddAddam trilogy for the screen

    1. Motion photos are similar to Apple's Live Photos feature. When you take a photo, the Pixel 2 will record a small video before and after you tap the shutter button.By default, the Pixel 2 will automatically capture Motion Photos in situations where it's warranted. Basically, whenever there's motion in the photo.

      "motion photos" on Pixel 2

    1. Unlike some theories, which focus on top-down goal-setting, GTD works in the opposite direction. Allen argues that it is often difficult for individuals to focus on big picture goals if they cannot sufficiently control the day-to-day tasks that they frequently must face.[1]:54 By developing and using the trusted system that deals with day-to-day inputs, an individual can free up mental space to begin moving up to the next level.

      bottom-up in GTD

    1. Rapid Resist is a 501c3 fiscally sponsored organization of Inquiring Systems. We do not directly lobby or endorse candidates for office. Rather we provide services to grassroots activists engaged in legislative and issues advocacy. For a detailed overview of c3 law, please see Bolder Advocacy's resource on the issues.Rapid Resist Action is a California 501c4 that conducts direct lobbying to stop the hateful, backwards Trump agenda and defend prosperity, democracy and dignity for every working class American. 

      Rapid Resist 501c3 fiscal sponsorship / Rapid Resist Action CA 501c4

    1. So what is the difference? Well, there isn’t much of one at all, actually. I say that because the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL are unlocked phones that do indeed work on all major US carriers and support 21 different LTE bands here, including those from AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint, US Cellular, and of course, Verizon. We aren’t sure why Google and Verizon are making this somewhat confusing, but it probably has to do with Verizon’s exclusive deal to be the only carrier in the US to sell the phone. Either way, if you buy the Verizon version of the Pixel 2 or Pixel 2 XL, you can then take it to any carrier you want and it’ll work.

      Happy that the Pixel 2 works on both GSM and CDMA phone.

    1. On 31 October 1517, Luther wrote to his bishop, Albrecht von Brandenburg, protesting the sale of indulgences. He enclosed in his letter a copy of his "Disputation of Martin Luther on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences", which came to be known as the Ninety-five Theses. Hans Hillerbrand writes that Luther had no intention of confronting the church, but saw his disputation as a scholarly objection to church practices, and the tone of the writing is accordingly "searching, rather than doctrinaire."[32] Hillerbrand writes that there is nevertheless an undercurrent of challenge in several of the theses, particularly in Thesis 86, which asks: "Why does the pope, whose wealth today is greater than the wealth of the richest Crassus, build the basilica of St. Peter with the money of poor believers rather than with his own money?"

      Oct 31, 1517

  18. Oct 2017
  19. Sep 2017
    1. Give those users the library's project key, which can be found under File > Project Properties...

      I think that we now use Script ID

    1. Is the US corporate tax rate so much higher?The US federal tax rate for corporations is 35% - the highest in the OECD. But very few businesses in the US actually pay the top rate, thanks in part to a bevy of loopholes. The effective tax rate for big corporations is actually about 22%, according to the US Treasury Department. The Republican plan would lower the official rate to 20%.That would be lower than in Australia (30%) and similar to the United Kingdom (about 19%), as well as many other countries in Europe.

      US tax rates compared to other countries'.

    1. An object is an iterator when it knows how to access items from a collection one at a time, while keeping track of its current position within that sequence. In JavaScript an iterator is an object that provides a next() method which returns the next item in the sequence. This method returns an object with two properties: done and value.

      description of iterator in ES2015

    1. 11:00-11:40am Béla Fleck & Abigail Washburn

      Béla Fleck and Abigail Washburn!

    1. It is based on JavaScript 1.6 with some portions of 1.7 and 1.8 and provides subset of ECMAScript 5 API,

      relationship between Apps Script and main versions of JavaScript

    1. Conventions for Python test discovery¶ pytest implements the following standard test discovery: If no arguments are specified then collection starts from testpaths (if configured) or the current directory. Alternatively, command line arguments can be used in any combination of directories, file names or node ids. recurse into directories, unless they match norecursedirs test_*.py or *_test.py files, imported by their test package name. Test prefixed test classes (without an __init__ method) test_ prefixed test functions or methods are test items For examples of how to customize your test discovery Changing standard (Python) test discovery. Within Python modules, pytest also discovers tests using the standard unittest.TestCase subclassing technique.

      how pytest finds ("discovers") tests

    1. Conventions for Python test discovery¶ pytest implements the following standard test discovery: If no arguments are specified then collection starts from testpaths (if configured) or the current directory. Alternatively, command line arguments can be used in any combination of directories, file names or node ids. Recurse into directories, unless they match norecursedirs. In those directories, search for test_*.py or *_test.py files, imported by their test package name. From those files, collect test items: test_ prefixed test functions or methods outside of class test_ prefixed test functions or methods inside Test prefixed test classes (without an __init__ method) For examples of how to customize your test discovery Changing standard (Python) test discovery. Within Python modules, pytest also discovers tests using the standard unittest.TestCase subclassing technique.

      Rules for how pytest finds ("discovers") tests.

    1. If I was to create an imaginary garden I wanted the toads in it to be real. One of my rules was that I would not put any events into the book that had not already happened in what James Joyce called the “nightmare” of history, nor any technology not already available. No imaginary gizmos, no imaginary laws, no imaginary atrocities. God is in the details, they say. So is the Devil.

      Atwood's rule that everything in Handmaid's Tale had to have some basis in historical events.

  20. web.archive.org web.archive.org
    1. Virginia “Ginny” Krauss Hearn18 February 1930 - 19 August 2017I have counted the number of times the word believe appears in the Gospel of John. Over 90 times. Yes, I believe, and I often pray, “Lord, I believe; help my unbelief.” In [John Updike’s] essays he described his present faith as “battered and vestigial, but unsurrendered.” I can accept those adjectives for myself.   (Virginia K. Hearn, “Decades Later: The Struggle to Serve Continues,” in Christian Feminism Today, Spring (April-June), 2009, p. 7)The community of New College Berkeley grieves the loss and celebrates the life of our dear friend Virginia, “Ginny,” Hearn who was a founding member of the New College Berkeley faculty and for many years served as Adjunct Professor of Communications and generous copy editor for the ministry (what’s written here would be far better were she available to improve it). Ginny’s strong faith, vigilant attention to clarity of thought and words, and her pioneering activism as a biblical feminist were gifts to our community and to the larger church. Her faith and her commitment to the truth of the Gospel were, indeed, never surrendered.Ginny grew up in Wisconsin, the eldest of three daughters. Her B.A. in Spanish and Education was from Otterbein College, and she pursued graduate studies in journalism and biblical studies at Northwestern University and Wheaton College. As a young woman she worked as an editor for InterVarsity Christian Fellowship, the Christian Medical Society, and Tyndale House Publishers. Ginny married Walter Hearn in 1966 and moved to Berkeley in 1972 where they became free-lance editors for various religious and secular publishers, editing more than 200 books. They wrote and edited prolifically and incisively, spreading the Light of Christian faith with literary excellence. The books Ginny wrote include What They Did Right: Reflections on Parents by Their Children (1974), Our Struggle to Serve: The Stories of 15 Evangelical Women (1979), and Just As I Am: Journal-Keeping for Spiritual Growth (1994). Ginny was a co-founder of the Bay Area chapter of the Evangelical Women’s Caucus (1975), a founding board member of New College Berkeley (1977), and the copy editor of Radix magazine for decades (beginning in 1973). Ginny taught more than 80 “Journal-Keeping Workshops” for New College Berkeley, shaping many of our spiritual lives.In addition to Ginny’s professional contributions, she was an encouraging friend to writers, women in Christian leadership, neighbors, and friends at the First Presbyterian Church of Berkeley. Ginny survived by only 4 months her dear husband of 51 years, and she is survived by his loving daughter Christine.The memorial service for Ginny will be on Tuesday, September 12th, at 2 o'clock in the Calvin Room of First Presbyterian Church of Berkeley. 

      A lovely tribute to Ginny Hearn

    1. Whenever the code or configuration files for your application are modified, you must create or update the modification date of the file "tmp/restart.txt" in the application's root directory tree in order to trigger Passenger to reinitialize the application. Passenger caches many resources so changes are not recognized unless the modification date of "tmp/restart.txt" is changed. The most common method to make this change is to run the following command via SSH. [server]$ "touch tmp/restart.txt" . (Ruby on Rails automatically creates a directory named "tmp". If you are creating non-RoR application, you may need to create the "tmp" directory manually.

      How to use touch tmp/restart.txt to reload code for Passenger WSGI on dreamhost.

    1. Initial Signatories Denny Burk President, Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood John Piper Founder & Teacher, Desiring God; Chancellor, Bethlehem College & Seminary James Dobson Founder & President, Family Talk Russell Moore President, Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission J. I. Packer Professor of Theology, Regent College Wayne Grudem Research Professor of Theology and Biblical Studies, Phoenix Seminary R. Albert Mohler, Jr. President, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Tony Perkins President, Family Research Council D. A. Carson Research Professor of New Testament, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School John MacArthur Pastor, Grace Community Church; President, The Master's Seminary & College Sam Allberry Editor, The Gospel Coalition R. C. Sproul Founder & Chairman, Ligonier Ministries Rosaria Butterfield Author of "The Secret Thoughts of an Unlikely Convert" Francis Chan Author & Pastor, We Are Church Marvin Olasky Editor in Chief, World Magazine Ligon Duncan Chancellor & CEO, Reformed Theological Seminary Steve Gaines President, The Southern Baptist Convention; Pastor, Bellevue Baptist Church Andrew T. Walker Director of Policy Studies, Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission H.B. Charles, Jr. Pastor, Shiloh Metropolitan Baptist Church of Jacksonville, Florida Christopher Yuan Speaker & Author, Moody Bible Institute Dennis Rainey Founder & Former President, FamilyLife Frank Page President & CEO, Southern Baptist Convention Executive Committee; Former President, Southern Baptist Convention Nancy DeMoss Wolgemuth Author & Speaker, Revive Our Hearts Daniel L. Akin President, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary Kevin DeYoung Senior Pastor, Christ Covenant Church Alistair Begg Reverend, Parkside Church Heath Lambert Executive Director, Association of Certified Biblical Counselors Jerry A. Johnson President & CEO, National Religious Broadcasters Mark Dever Pastor, Capitol Hill Baptist Church Randy Alcorn Director, Eternal Perspective Ministries Karen Swallow Prior Professor of English, Liberty University Matt Chandler Pastor, The Village Church Fred Luter Senior Pastor Franklin Avenue Baptist Church; Former President, Southern Baptist Convention James MacDonald Founder & Senior Pastor, Harvest Bible Chapel James Merritt Pastor, Cross Pointe Church; Former President, Southern Baptist Convention Jack Graham Pastor, Prestonwood Baptist Church J. D. Greear Pastor, The Summit Church Darryl Delhousaye President, Phoenix Seminary Thomas White President, Cedarville University Bryant Wright Senior Pastor, Johnson Ferry Baptist Church; Former SBC President Don Sweeting President, Colorado Christian University Jeff Purswell Director of Theology, Sovereign Grace Churches Johnny Hunt Pastor, First Baptist Church of Woodstock Jason K. Allen President, Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Erick-Woods Erickson Editor in Chief, The Resurgent Mark L. Bailey President & Senior Professor of Bible Exposition, Dallas Theological Seminary K. Erik Thoennes Professor & Chair of Theology, Talbot School of Theology, Biola University Vaughan Roberts Rector of St. Ebbe's Church, Oxford, UK David French Senior Writer, National Review Paige Patterson President, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary R. Kent Hughes Visiting Professor of Practical Theology of Evangelism and Culture, Westminster Theological Seminary Jeff Iorg President, Gateway Seminary Sam Storms Lead Pastor for Preaching and Vision, Bridgeway Church Richard Land President, Southern Evangelical Seminary Robert A. J. Gagnon Scholar & Author of "The Bible and Homosexual Practice" Samuel W. "Dub" Oliver President, Union University Ronnie Floyd Senior Pastor, Cross Church; Former President, Southern Baptist Convention C. J. Mahaney Senior Pastor, Sovereign Grace Church of Louisville Jason G. Duesing Provost, Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary & College Matt Carter Pastor, The Austin Stone Church Chuck Kelley President, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Burk Parsons Copastor, St. Andrew's Chapel Eric Teetsel President, Family Policy Alliance of Kansas Alastair Roberts Scholar & Author of "Heirs Together: A Theology of the Sexes" Kevin Ezell President, North American Mission Board Ray Ortlund Pastor, Immanuel Church O. S. Hawkins President, GuideStone SBC Thom S. Rainer President & CEO, LifeWay Christian Resources Michael Reeves President & Professor of Theology, Union School of Theology, UK Todd Wagner Pastor, Watermark Community Church John M. Frame Professor Emeritus of Systematic Theology & Philosophy, Reformed Theological Seminary Randy Stinson Senior Vice President for Academic Administration & Provost, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Mac Brunson Senior Pastor, First Baptist Church of Jacksonville Thomas Schreiner James Buchanan Harrison Professor of New Testament Interpretation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary H. Wayne House Dean & Distinguished Research Professor of Theology, Law, & Culture, Faith International University & Seminary J. P. Moreland Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Talbot School of Theology, Biola University Bruce Ware Professor of Christian Theology, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Michael Goeke Associate Pastor, First Baptist Church of San Francisco Joel Belz Founder, World Magazine, World News Group Afshin Ziafat Lead Pastor, Providence Church Stephen Strang Founder & CEO, Charisma Media Christiana Holcomb Legal Counsel, Alliance Defending Freedom Jimmy Draper President Emeritus, LifeWay; Former President, Southern Baptist Convention Owen Strachan Associate Professor of Christian Theology, Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Anthony Kidd Pastor of Preaching, Community of Faith Bible Church James M. Hamilton, Jr. Professor of Biblical Theology, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Bryan Carter Senior Pastor, Concord Church Chris Larson President & CEO, Ligonier Ministries Bruce Riley Ashford Provost & Professor of Theology & Culture, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary Candi Finch Assistant Professor of Theology in Women's Studies, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Curtis Woods Associate Executive Director, Kentucky Baptist Convention Nathan Finn Dean, Professor of Theological Studies, Union University James Robison Founder & President, LIFE Outreach International; Founder & Publisher, The Stream C. Ben Mitchell Graves Professor of Moral Philosophy, Union University Darrell Bock Senior Professor, Dallas Theological Seminary David Mathis Executive Editor, Desiring God Ken Magnuson Professor of Christian Ethics, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Daniel Heimbach Senior Professor of Christian Ethics, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary Hershael W. York Victor and Louise Lester Professor of Christian Preaching, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Mary Mohler Director, Seminary Wives Institute Hunter Baker Associate Professor, Union University Dorothy Kelley Patterson Professor of Theology in Women's Studies, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Jim Shaddix W. A. Criswell Professor of Expository Preaching, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary John N. Oswalt Visiting Distinguished Professor of Old Testament, Asbury Theological Seminary Jack Deere Author & Speaker, Grace Church of St. Louis Juan R. Sanchez Senior Pastor, High Pointe Baptist Church, Austin, Texas Malcolm B. Yarnell, III Research Professor of Systematic Theology, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Jonathan Leeman Editorial Director, 9Marks Mary A. Kassian Author & Director, Girls Gone Wise Mark Daniel Liederbach Vice President & Professor of Theology, Ethics and Culture, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary Matthew J. Hall Dean of Boyce College & Senior VP of Academic Innovation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Micah Fries Senior Pastor, Brainerd Baptist Church Nathan Lino Senior Pastor, Northeast Houston Baptist Church Paul Weber President & CEO, Family Policy Alliance Bob Lepine Vice President of Content, FamilyLife Casey B. Hough Senior Pastor, First Baptist Church of Camden Russell Shubin Director, Salem Media Group Allan Coppedge Retired Professor of Theology, Asbury Theological Seminary Daniel DeWitt Director of the Center for Biblical Apologetics & Public Christianity, Cedarville University Charlotte Akin Homemaker, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary Don Buckley Physician, Spanish Trail Family Physicians David Schrock Pastor for Preaching and Theology, Occoquan Bible Church E. Calvin Beisner Founder & National Spokesman, Cornwall Alliance for the Stewardship of Creation Donald A. Balasa Adjunct Faculty, Trinity International University Donna Thoennes Adjunct Professor & Homeschool Mom, Biola University James A. Borland Professor of New Testament & Theology, Liberty University Eric C. Redmond Assistant Professor of Bible, Moody Bible Institute Grant Castleberry Pastor of Discipleship, Providence Church of Frisco, Texas Jose Abella Lead Pastor, Providence Road Church Phillip Bethancourt Executive Vice President, Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission Adam W. Greenway Dean, Billy Graham School of Missions, Evangelism, & Ministry, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Joy White Homemaker & Assistant Professor of Women's Studies, Cedarville University Gregory Wills Dean, School of Theology, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Katie McCoy Assistant Professor of Theology in Women's Studies, Scarborough College at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Rhyne R. Putman Associate Professor of Theology & Culture, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Barry Joslin Professor of Christian Theology, Boyce College Rhonda Kelley President's Wife, Adjunct Faculty, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Peter Jones Executive Director, TruthXchange Bryan Baise Assistant Professor of Philosophy & Apologetics, Boyce College Kenneth Keathley Senior Professor of Theology, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary Jeff Struecker Lead Pastor, Calvary Baptist Church Rebecca Jones Volunteer, TruthXchange Evan Lenow Associate Professor of Ethics, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary Daniel Patterson Vice President for Operations & Chief of Staff, Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission David Talley Professor of Old Testament, Biola University Travis Wussow Vice President for Public Policy, Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission Sean Perron Chief of Staff, Association of Certified Biblical Counselors Michael L. Brown President, FIRE School of Ministry Keith Whitfield Assistant Professor & Dean, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary Jeffrey Riley Professor of Ethics, New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Dannah Gresh Co-founder, Pure Freedom Matt Damico Associate Pastor of Worship, Kenwood Baptist Church Colby Adams Director of Communications, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary Paul Felix President, Los Angeles Bible Training School Dick Lucas Reverend Prebendary, Rector Emeritus, St Helen's Bishopsgate, London Paul Nyquist President, Moody Bible Institute Jackie Hill Perry Speaker, Writer, Humble Beast Recording Artist Colin Smothers Executive Director, Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood

      Initial signatories to the Nashville Statement

  21. Aug 2017
    1. You can only create new goals from the Google Calendar app. Any goals you create from the app will show on Google Calendar on your computer.

      Annoying limitation of the current implementation of goals in Google Calendar.

    1. Contrary to Trump’s threat of fire and fury, Bannon said: “There’s no military solution [to North Korea’s nuclear threats], forget it. Until somebody solves the part of the equation that shows me that ten million people in Seoul don’t die in the first 30 minutes from conventional weapons, I don’t know what you’re talking about, there’s no military solution here, they got us.”

      Sane words from Steve Bannon on North Korea.

    1. On July 7, a BLM protest was held in Dallas, Texas that was organized to protest the deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile. At the end of the peaceful protest, Micah Xavier Johnson opened fire in an ambush, killing five police officers and wounding seven others and two civilians. The gunman was then killed by a robot-delivered bomb.[143] Before he died, according to police, Johnson said that "he was upset about Black Lives Matter", and that "he wanted to kill white people, especially white officers."[144][144] Texas Lt. Governor Dan Patrick and other conservative lawmakers blamed the shootings on the Black Lives Matter movement.[145][146] The Black Lives Matter network released a statement denouncing the shootings.[147][148][149] On July 8, more than 100 people were arrested at Black Lives Matter protests across the United States.[150]

      shooting in Dallas blamed by some on BLM

    1. 29 8 "Dreamland" Rich Newey Lynne E. Litt July 31, 2017 (2017-07-31) TBD Fred Overmyer (John Posey), a former air force cadet is killed; his death possibly being connected to extraterrestrial life. Kirsten stitches into Overmyer's mind and into his memories from over thirty years ago to figure out what led to his death. Stephanie gets a job offer in Washington, D.C., with Fisher contemplating moving there with her. Kirsten is finally told that Ivy has been in contact with Daniel Stinger; she and Linus then discover an even more shocking secret about Ivy.

      Episode 3.8 "Dreamland" of Stitchers

    1. Add a sheet The following spreadsheets.batchUpdate request adds a sheet to a spreadsheet, while also setting the title, size, and tab color. This request returns an AddSheetResponse, consisting of an object with the created sheet's properties (such as its sheetId).

      Good to know that the Sheets API v4 has functionality or adding sheets.

  22. Jul 2017
    1. Only standalone scripts can be imported or exported. Container-bound scripts cannot be accessed through the Google Drive REST API.

      I was wondering whether I could use a combination of the Sheets API v4 & the Google Drive REST API to create a new sheet with data and code. The answer seems to be no.

  23. albanyhillside.nextdoor.com albanyhillside.nextdoor.com
    1. Thanks to Jenny Craik, for speaking at the July 27th Transportation and Safety Committee meeting about San Pablo and Clay! I just watched thought Jenny's 3 minute presentation (https://youtu.be/66wpkSUBIu8?t=11m15s), which I thought was quite clear and effective. In response, Ms. Andrino-Chavez (15:10) told the meeting that a design process is under way to improve safety on San Pablo Ave. Look for a public process to start this fall and to run approximately 8 months.

      my comment on the July 27th meeting.

    1. The unsupported features are: Support for obtaining user credentials. While this library has support for using user credentials, there are no provisions in the core library for doing the three-party OAuth 2.0 flow to obtain authorization from a user. Instead, we are opting to provide a separate package that does integration with oauthlib, google-auth-oauthlib. When that library has a stable API, we will consider its inclusion into the core library. Support for storing credentials. The only credentials type that needs to be stored are user credentials. We have a discussion thread on what level of support we should do. It’s very likely we’ll choose to provide an abstract interface for this and leave it up to application to provide storage implementation specific to their use case. It’s also very likely that we will also incubate this functionality in the google-auth-oauthlib library before including it in the core library.

      unsupported features in google-auth

    1. Note: oauth2client is now deprecated. No more features will be added to the libraries and the core team is turning down support. We recommend you use google-auth and oauthlib.

      This deprecation note should be highlighted more clearly.

    1. With the dialog box as the front-most window (you can click once in the dialog box to make sure it’s in front), press the command, shift, and period keys at the same time.

      Cmd-Shift-period (⌘⇧.)

    1. User Package The Packages/User/ folder is the User package. It is unique in that it is loaded last by Sublime Text. This allows users to place changes to .sublime-settings and .sublime-keymap files in this folder. Sublime Text loads these files by name. Thus if a package has a file named Package Control.sublime-settings in the package, a file with the same name in the User package will override any of the settings in the original file. The same is true for key bindings.

      This explains why customizing Packages/User is a way to customize settings from various installed packages in ST3.

    1. These days, most diners, and even stallholders themselves, often confuse the Hainanese for Cantonese chicken rice. Signboards or menus say ‘Hainanese’ but what you actually get is Cantonese. The difference? The Hainanese do not soak their chicken in icy cold water after boiling it, hence there is no jelly-like layer of gelatin developing just beneath the skin. The chicken is soaked in room-temperature water for 30 minutes or so, then dripped dry and placed on a tray, covered with a piece of towel. The Cantonese, on the other hand, plunge the chicken in icy water then hang it to drip dry, leaving theirs with the thin gelatinous layer below the skin.

      difference between Hainanese and Cantonese chicken rice?

    1. Meanwhile, the scholar Nicole Wright’s revelation that Austen was appearing as an avatar of sexual propriety and racial purity on white-supremacist websites made national news on both sides of the Atlantic.
    1. But when people hear the word concurrency they often think of parallelism, a related but quite distinct concept. In programming, concurrency is the composition of independently executing processes, while parallelism is the simultaneous execution of (possibly related) computations. Concurrency is about dealing with lots of things at once. Parallelism is about doing lots of things at once.

      Nice paragraph distinguishing between concurrency and parallelism.

    1. The second major strand of falsehood we have observed is one that portrays Trump as a would-be dictator, straying beyond his constitutional powers and imposing his will on whatever and whomever he chooses. It has to be said that these claims have primarily come in the form of blatantly fabricated posts and stories from disreputable sources. Like a satirical News Werthy article that reported that Trump was looking into an executive order to abolish impeachment, or an artist’s “Future Internment Camp” signs in various vacant lots, which were mistaken for genuine by some readers and observers.

      These two paragraphs strike me as way off base, especially:

      It has to be said that these claims have primarily come in the form of blatantly fabricated posts and stories from disreputable sources.

      How such serious arguments as Yale professor Timothy Snyder's On Tyranny? That there are weak arguments for Trump's tyranny doesn't invalidate the strong arguments.

    1. * the word "germinal" is the gender neutral form of the word "seminal."

      This answers a question I could almost articulate.

    1. For our audit, we used a proxy model. We built a logistic regression proxy model using the attributes collected by ProPublica and assumed this model was an oracle, i.e., a reasonable approximation of the COMPAS model. We then audit this proxy model for bias using FairML. As a sanity check, we also built more sophisticated models using the ProPublica data, and our conclusions remain the same.

      Good summary of the work.

    2. This post is a prelude to our upcoming research report and prototype on algorithmic interpretability, which we’ll release in the next few months.

      Have this report and prototype come out yet?

  24. Jun 2017
    1. For Democratic Senators Does your Democratic Senator already oppose TrumpCare? Great. Now, what else are they doing to stop the bill from passing? They should be as fired up as you are, they should be doing everything within their power to stop or slow the process in the Senate. Ask them to: Ask them to resist through procedure. Your Democratic Senator can draw attention to the secret process and slow down Senate business, through a combination of filibustering and  “withholding consent.” The rules of the Senate are so complicated that Senators have to regularly consent to waiving some of them so that they can actually get work done. That includes shortening time for debates, expediting consideration of amendments, and scheduling committees. Your Senator can slow the Senate down to a crawl and focus attention to TrumpCare by withholding his or her consent on legislative business. Ask them to filibuster by amendment. Republicans are using a special process called “reconciliation” to jam through TrumpCare. This means they only 50 senators to vote in favor in order to pass it, instead of the usual 60. But the trade-off is that they have to allow an unlimited number of amendments. Any Senator can file as many amendments as they want and then call them up for a vote on the Senate floor during a period called “vote-a-rama.” Democratic Senators can and should plan thousands of amendments and keep them going until Republicans agree to have public hearings on the bill. Indivisible groups are going to have an impact because these actions will happen all across the country. It’s important to engage in this plan in every state. That being said, there are a few frontline members that should receive some extra pressure: Susan Collins (ME), Lisa Murkowski (AK), Dean Heller (NV), Shelley Moore Capito (WV), Bill Cassidy (LA), Rob Portman (OH), Tom Cotton (AR), Cory Gardner (CO), Jeff Flake (AZ), Pat Toomey (PA) and Dan Sullivan (AK).

      What those of us with Democratic Senators can do to oppose the AHCA.

    1. The macOS Scripting Trilogy Even experts will learn something new, and everyone will gain insight. Join Automation guru Sal Soghoian as he reveals power features of AppleScript, AppleScriptObj-C, and JavaScript for Automation (JXA) that are often hidden in plain sight.

      3 major macOS automation technology: AppleScript, AppleScriptObj-C, and JavaScript for Automation (JXA)

    1. Starting but not finishing too many projects puts a person at risk of the so-called Zeigarnik effect, named for Bluma Zeigarnik, a Russian psychiatrist who, in the 1920s, discovered that people are better at remembering unfinished tasks than completed ones. Unfinished items that we’ve left hanging are like cognitive itches. (Zeigarnik first made this observation watching servers remember detailed meal orders at a restaurant only as long as the order was in process.)

      Didn't know that I suffer from the Zeigarnik effect.

  25. May 2017
    1. You can't just dismiss people as lost, even bad or misguided people. Unless every great thinker from Christ to Tolstoy to Gandhi to Dr. King is wrong, it's especially those people you have to keep believing in, and trying to reach.

      High point

    2. Barack Obama, for all his faults, never gave in to that mindset. He continually insisted that the Democrats needed to find a way to reach lost voters. Even in the infamous "guns and religion" episode, this was so. Obama then was talking about the challenge the Democrats faced in finding ways to reconnect with people who felt ignored and had fled to "antipathy toward people who aren't like them" as a consequence.

      Why is it so hard to not qualify every bit of praise with Obama with weasle phrases like "for all his faults"?

    3. Things are so polarized now that, as Georgia State professor Jennifer McCoy put it on NPR this spring, each side views the other not as fellow citizens with whom they happen to disagree, but as a "threatening enemy to be vanquished."The "deplorables" comment formalized this idea that Democrats had given up on a huge chunk of the population, and now sought only to defeat and subdue their enemies.

      Is that what's happening with the Dems?

    1. Democratic involvement? If this race is close, some Democrats have asked, why hasn’t the national party spent more money here? National Democrats took similar heat for not investing more in Kansas’ 4th District special election last month.The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee has spent about half a million dollars in Montana, funneling early money through the state party so that Quist could go up on TV, and later bolstering that with additional TV and mail efforts. But the overwhelming majority of outside spending in this race has been for Gianforte and against Quist.“Money is not what’s going to make Rob Quist win or lose this race,” a Democratic operative familiar with the state said. And Quist hasn’t suffered from lack of money. He received $1 million in just five days, his campaign announced this week.But the Democrats’ focus is clearly on Georgia, for which DCCC chairman Ben Ray Luján announced an additional $2 million in spending this week — the same day he acknowledged that “the data shows a tough path forward” in Montana.“You’re seeing investments made district to district that are smart investments, specific to those districts,” Luján said at a Tuesday press conference.

      One analysis on spending by DNC and DCCC on Quist

    1. Re: Is Scapple still alive? Quote   Postby KB » Mon Feb 20, 2017 12:49 pm Scapple has definitely *not* been abandoned, although it has certainly been a long time since there has been an update, for which I am sorry. The simple fact is that, on the macOS side, I am a single developer, and along with Scapple I develop the much more complex Scrivener, and in 2015 I had to abandon hopes of another developer helping me with the iOS version of Scrivener and code that myself, which took up the latter part of 2015 and a huge part of 2016. Along with that, over the past couple of years, I have been focussing on a big update to Scrivener on macOS. On the Windows side, the two developers there have been concentrating on getting Scrivener for Windows caught up with the macOS version for the next major update.Because I knew from the start that Scrivener would take up most of my time, I deliberately designed Scapple to be simple and something that would not see (or need) too many updates, and that would be fairly low maintenance. That said, there are a number of enhancements and fixes I do want to make to it. By this summer, I hope to have Scrivener back in maintenance mode for a while, following the major development push on the macOS and iOS versions over the past two years, which should allow me some time to make some updates to Scapple. That said, I'm not planning on making major changes or additions to Scapple, because it was designed to fulfil a very simple need (the software equivalent of the way I scrawl over paper).All the best,Keith "You can't waltz in here, use my toaster, and start spouting universal truths without qualification."

      I'm happy to hear that there will be some small fixes to Scapple.

    1. https://api.myngp.com/v2

      Is this the correct base URL for production? How about for the sandbox?

    2. The username should be set to apiuser

      Should I be using apiuser?

    1. Novelist Mary Rakow in conversation with the Rev. Liz Tichenor

      "Novelist Mary Rakow in conversation with the Rev. Liz Tichenor"

    2. HOLY REFLECTIONS FROM A HOLY WEEK

      My reflection for the Good Friday afternoon service at All Souls.

    1. gjmveloso commented on Oct 20, 2016 Hi @rosshinkley, Thanks for your response. XPath is the only available option to select elements by the inner text, for instance. It's widely used on Selenium space, for example. Thanks, Gustavo

      I agree that not being able to use XPath selectors along side of CSS selectors is a big limitation for nightmare.js.

    1. sbacic commented on Mar 24 To add to my original post - I've gone over the tests and found this little gem: https://github.com/segmentio/nightmare/blob/master/test/index.js#L341 Apparently, wait can be made more reliable by adding a longer softTimeout value (I've been using 1000ms) as the second argument, eg: wait('a', 1000). Not sure why this isn't mentioned in the documentation. 👍 5 Pick your reaction 👍 👎 😄 🎉 😕 ❤️

      use of softTimeout value in wait very useful for nightmare.js

    1. Calling from Python As of 10.10, AppleScript can use Cocoa frameworks in any Script Editor-based script. This makes it easy for Python and other languages that have Objective-C bridges to call AppleScript directly, without having to package everything as an Xcode app. Stick one or more compiled .scpt files containing AppleScript-ObjC "classes" into a folder, e.g.: use framework "Foundation" use scripting additions script MyASClass property parent : class "NSObject" -- on test() activate display dialog "Hello from AppleScript!" end test end script then just use it from Python like this: from Foundation import NSBundle, NSClassFromString import AppleScriptObjC NSBundle.alloc().initWithPath_(FOLDERPATH).loadAppleScriptObjectiveCScripts() MyASClass = NSClassFromString(u"MyASClass") # get the ASOC class... MyASClass.alloc().init().test() # ...then instantiate and call it

      Given that appscript is deprecated, I'm looking at how to call AppleScript directly from Python. This section is a "hello world" demonstration of how.

    1. Q: Why is PhantomJS not written as Node.js module? A: The short answer: “No one can serve two masters.” A longer explanation is as follows. As of now, it is technically very challenging to do so. Every Node.js module is essentially “a slave” to the core of Node.js, i.e. “the master”. In its current state, PhantomJS (and its included WebKit) needs to have the full control (in a synchronous matter) over everything: event loop, network stack, and JavaScript execution. If the intention is just about using PhantomJS right from a script running within Node.js, such a “loose binding” can be achieved by launching a PhantomJS process and interact with it.

      relationship between PhantomJS and Node.js

    1. GnuCash 2 can import financial data from several types of files. But you can also connect directly from within your account registers to your financial institutions to download transaction data directly to your registers. In Europe, for banks using HBCI, you can even initiate bank transactions from within GnuCash. Those of us in the U.S., living in a Quicken and MSMoney dominated environment, generally must use OFX based data for online banking. See if your institution is supported at ofxhome. At present, OFXDirectConnect can be used to download transaction data from credit card and bank accounts. Investment transactions should still be imported from downloaded OFX files (I use ofx.py) via GnuCash's File>Import>Import OFX/QFX... menu option.

      OFX vs HBCI

    1. The following notice is for jurors summoned for Monday May 15, 2017   No Jurors are needed for the 8:30 A.M. roll call.   If your number was not included, please revisit this website or call (510) 729-8636 on Monday May 15, 2017 between 11:00 AM and 12:00 PM, for further instructions.

      Do I have to report for jury duty this afternoon?

    1. Four Levels of Inter-religious Dialogue The dialogue of llfe, where people strive to live in an open and neighborly spirit, sharing their joy and sorrows, their human problems and preoccupations. The dialogue of action, in which persons of all religions collaborate for the integral development and liberation of people. The dialogue of theological exchange, where specialists seek to deepen their understanding of their respective religious heritages, and to appreciate each other’s spiritual values. The dialogue of religious experience, where persons, rooted in their own religious traditions, share their spiritual riches, for instance with regard to prayer and contemplation, faith and ways of searching for God or the Absolute.

      Very helpful outline of a framework for inter-religious dialogue.

    1. On March 20, 2017, during public testimony to the House Intelligence Committee, FBI director James Comey confirmed the existence of an FBI investigation into Russian interference and Russian links to the Trump campaign, including the question of whether there had been any coordination between the campaign and the Russians.[24] He said the investigation began in July 2016 and was "still in its early stages".[25] Comey made the unusual decision to reveal the ongoing investigation to Congress, citing benefit to the public good.[93]

      Comey's public confirmation of a FBI investigation.

    1. Then, barely an hour before the official close of campaigning at midnight Friday, the staff of the presumed front-runner, Emmanuel Macron, a 39-year-old former investment banker, announced that his campaign had been the target of a “massive and coordinated” hacking operation.

      hello