12 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2018
    1. If, reading Herodotus, we have the sentiment of a turning point, do we not have, reading our times, the certainty of an even more considerable change, such that the events offering themselves to us would no longer be linked in a way according to what we are used to calling history, but in a way still unknown? . . . Today we meet an event bearing an elementary trait, that of impersonal powers, represented by the intervention of mass phenomena, by the supremacy of mechanical play, and thirdly by the seizure of the constitutive forces of matter. These three factors are named in a single word: modern technics, since technics comprises at once collective organization on a planetary scale for the calculated establishment of plans, mechanization and automation, and finally atomic energy, a key word. What hitherto only stars could accomplish, mankind does. Mankind has become astral. This astral era that has begun no longer belongs to the measures of history. (Blanchot 1969, 396) To the measures of history belonged the divide separating the human world from the stars, and thereby constituting that world. Humanity (the human world) was history (the world of Herodotus was the human world). Humanity (the human world) has become a star (has become the world of the human having become a star). This is an astral figure of power, which speaks to a change in epoch, to modern technics. But the power of whom or of what? Of humanity, or of the “impersonal forces” of modern technics itself?

      Stiegler > Blanchot > Herodotus: "Humanity (the human world) has become a star (has become the world of the human having become a star)." ||

  2. Jul 2014
  3. Mar 2014
  4. Feb 2014
    1. Mazares

      This is a test annotation

    2. For my part, I shall not say that this or that story is true, but I shall identify the one who I myself know did the Greeks unjust deeds, and thus proceed with my history, and speak of small and great cities of men alike.

      1.5. Herodotus speaks to the reader again.

    3. Herodotus

      1.1. Herodotus introduces himself to the reader/listener.

    4. For my part, I shall not say that this or that story is true, but I shall identify the one who I myself know did the Greeks unjust deeds, and thus proceed with my history, and speak of small and great cities of men alike.

      Hdt. 1.5 Herodotus admits that these things are hearsay and does not take a side, only tells both sides of the story.

    5. After this time, the destruction by Cyrus son of Cambyses of the sovereignty of Astyages son of Cyaxares, and the growth of the power of the Persians, distracted Croesus from his mourning;

      1.46 This is the first mention on Cyrus in Herodotus. Cyrus's conflict against Croesus and the subsequent spread of his empire become the subject of the rest of book 1.

  5. Jan 2014
    1. Herodotus 1.70. To show their gratitude to Croesus, the Spartans sent a bronze bowl to him in Sardis; however, the bowl never reached him. There are two different stories on why the bowl never got their. The question that should be asked though should be, "what was the relationship between the Samians, the Spartans, and the Lydians."

    2. Herodotus 1.69. A network has been established between Croesus and the Spartans. The text gives an instance where Croesus instead of trading with the Spartans actually gives them a free gift.

    3. Eleon

      5.43: The Landmark Herodotus notes that this is a city near Tanagra in Boeotia, the precise location of which is unknown (Strassler 2009, note to 5.43.1a, p. 384).

    4. Many stories are told of Cyrus' death; this, that I have told, is the most credible.

      Hdt. 1.214: Cyrus seems to have been buried at Pasargadae, where there is a built tomb associated with him (http://pleiades.stoa.org/places/922693/location-of-tomb-of-cyrus-the-great).