157 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2019
    1. I have moments where I’m really involved and immersed in NYSCI and Hive almost on the same level, other times I have to take a step back, and sometimes the Hive has gone a little MIA or quiet as they transition and figure things out, as they shape the network. It’s been a bit of a roller coaster ride over the past couple of years. For me, that’s been the biggest challenge — going through that process.
    1. Success? I don’t really like that term, because the opposite of success is assumed to be failure. When we talk in terms of social movements, I think the most important thing is to continue fighting, doing the work, establishing networks, making connections, meeting people, exchanging ideas, and at some point, achieving greater change. In that context, and using your term, I believe that continuing our work should always be considered a success.
    1. There are various elements that contribute to the difficulty of brokering within a network like Remake Learning, such as competition (for funding, for participants, etc), and less sharing  because of it. Networks can help share metrics, data, and build pathways for young people to participate between programs, but it’s still not working for everyone. It’s a multi-sector problem, which is why it’s important to work with organizations like Mozilla, or with the government, or with the private sector, in addition to all the nonprofits, academia, and K-12.
    1. Another instance, is my collaboration with the Nemetics Institute of Arts and Science, Kolkata (NIASK), where I do research on complex adaptive systems, and design pieces to share the Institute’s research. It is a network of many great minds, who are scattered around the world. I’ve been working with them for a while now, and, even though I feel that I know them, I have only met two of them in person. We work online, and we use Twitter, Popplet, Gtools, and any other new open source tech we can find. It’s because of this ability to connect and collaborate online that we are able to work together, even from far away. The open web and open source technologies provide opportunities to collaborate with people we’ve never met, across the globe.
    1. I was part of the team that founded Creative Commons in Tanzania. Since that time, we’ve created a large network and come to know so many people. To me, that’s the greatest strength of my involvement with CC; I’ve gotten to connect not only with people from Tanzania, but also people from around the world. I now have friends in places like South Africa, Kenya, Nigeria – and colleagues in South Korea and Canada, where I attended previous summits. If it weren’t for Creative Commons, I wouldn’t have met these people. The success is the power of networking.
    1. It’s so hard to capture those network effects. It’s something we did, we are, and we will continue to struggle with. You probably know that a little bit from your PASE experience. We understand that those results from the network effect can be so impactful, but they’re so hard to measure and talk about.
    2. As a participant in the Hive network, there were many moments when I felt that there were great ideas being shared. What I always enjoyed the most was hearing from other organizations and what they were doing. I would learn about their work, their unique perspective, and their way of doing things with young people. When it came to working together and collaborating, I didn’t always feel like everyone was truly open to that or able to engage in that way. I felt some wanted to keep a really close, tight knit group so it was hard to figure out how to actually begin collaborations. A lot of the groups were smaller organizations and so funding is always a driving factor and they likely saw others as competitors, making it difficult to figure out how collaboration could work. There were moments when I kind of felt like, “Do I really belong in this room right now?” But I felt there was always a greater good and that I had something to offer and things to learn, which is what kept bringing me back.
    1. People conflate ideas of community and network and think that they’re interchangeable, but they’re not. Communities are strong because of their similarity in their bonds and they tend to circle and look inward. Networks — and I’m not saying these are mutually exclusive or that one’s better than the other, I’m just articulating where I think a difference is — intentionally look outward and leverage difference to augment and gain strength over time. And so many people when they do this kind of work miss the nuance of the difference and they’ll use community and network interchangeably in the space of two sentences. That really misses the power and the weaknesses of both systems. So it starts with understanding that a network is actually going to be seeking out difference to build its strength. Successful networks understand the difference between strong and weak bonds and that weak bonds are actually incredibly powerful and useful. To then take those networks to be high-performing, you actually want the nodes in the network, whether they be people or organizations or a mix, to understand how to toggle between being strong and weak. A strong network is going to know when those things turn on or off, depending on the problem, depending on the opportunity, and so on. A network is strong when you have many dormant, weak connections that can flip back on. Hive NYC, as a project able to advance a field, did so because of these networked practices.
    1. I think the Pinkerton Foundation sees the value in networks and in people in the field sharing best practices. There’s no reason to reinvent the wheel for out-of-school programming, especially around digital learning, so it’s important for us, and the individual organizations, to see the network continue. The challenge is that the Hive started off as a funding stream, so a lot of organizations came together in part to share best practices, but also for the potential to receive funding. Now that that piece is gone, I worry about how involved the members will continue to be, but encourage them to stay connected, especially because of the value that it has on their programming. For the network to continue, there needs to be a group of members who are willing to take the lead and organize the meetings and other gatherings. And I understand that it requires time and resources that some members may not be able to commit to.
    2. Earlier on, I struggled with not knowing how other organizations could become part of the network. I wasn’t sure about the structure or timeline for members to join and participate in that kind of community. It was great to see that a few of my grantees had come on board.
    1. Right now, a lot of people are getting turned off and apathetic from participating in developing community infrastructure. We need to nurture participation and show how important it is. Right now, the civic sphere — the words and the rhetoric — looks scary, aggressive, and mean. I don’t want our folks to turn off and to not participate.
  2. May 2019
    1. When designing the addressing plan for an application, the primary consideration is to keep the CIDR blocks used for creating subnets within a single zone as contiguous as possible
    1. The CIDR block must not be the same or larger than the CIDR range of a route in any of the VPC route tables.
    2. You have a limit on the number of CIDR blocks you can associate with a VPC and the number of routes you can add to a route table. You cannot associate a CIDR block if this results in you exceeding your limits.
      • IPv4 CIDR blocks per VPC 5 This limit is made up of your primary CIDR block plus 4 secondary CIDR blocks.

      • Route tables per VPC

      200

      This limit includes the main route table.

      • Routes per route table (non-propagated routes)

      50

      You can increase this limit up to a maximum of 1000; however, network performance might be impacted. This limit is enforced separately for IPv4 routes and IPv6 routes.

      If you have more than 125 routes, we recommend that you paginate calls to describe your route tables for better performance.

    3. You cannot increase or decrease the size of an existing CIDR block.
    4. The allowed block size is between a /28 netmask and /16 netmask.
    5. Adding IPv4 CIDR Blocks to a VPC

      Expanding a VPC IPv4 CIDR block

  3. Apr 2019
    1. After all, the best messaging app in most countries or continents is the one most other people are already using there.
  4. Mar 2019
    1. ip命令可以说是无比强大了,它完全可以替换ifconfig、netstat、route、arp等命令,比如查看网卡eth1 IP地址:
  5. Feb 2019
    1. Beauty is no quality in things themselves: It exists merely in the mind which contemplatesthem;

      Right--beauty is about a relationship to a thing or an opinion about a thing, not about the thing itself. Beauty has as much to do with the viewer as it does with the beautiful object. Recognizing beauty or having taste involves a network of actors in a given context. Does Hume believe that it is our job to consolidate these recognitions into one general rule for recognizing?

  6. Jan 2019
    1. African American writers and readers also forged alliances with white abolitionist

      this alliance between black and white abolitionist aided the creation of print networks, in which information and literature such as pamphlets, essays, books where created, distributed and shared. the first true social networks within the Atlantic. Amazing!!

  7. Dec 2018
    1. Newport is an academic — he makes his primary living teaching computer science at a university, so he already has a built-in network and a self-contained world with clear moves towards achievement.

      This is one of the key reasons people look to social media--for the connections and the network they don't have via non-digital means. Most of the people I've seen with large blogs or well-traveled websites have simply done a much better job of connecting and interacting with their audience and personal networks. To a great extent this is because they've built up a large email list to send people content directly. Those people then read their material and comment on their blogs.

      This is something the IndieWeb can help people work toward in a better fashion, particularly with better independent functioning feed readers.

    1. His weak-tie networks had been politically activated

      This makes me wonder if she's cited Mark Granovetter or any of similar sociologists yet?

      Apparently she did in footnote 32 in chapter 1. Ha!

    2. Only a segment of the population needs to be connected digitally to affect the entire environment. In Egypt in 2011, only 25 percent of the population of the country was on-line, with a smaller portion of those on Facebook, but these people still managed to change the wholesale public discussion, including conversa-tions among people who had never been on the site.

      There's some definite connection to this to network theory of those like Stuart Kaufmann. You don't need every node to be directly connected to create a robust network, particularly when there are other layers--here interpersonal connections, cellular, etc.

  8. Nov 2018
  9. Oct 2018
  10. Sep 2018
    1. Whilespatial biases may contribute to these findings,asnodes belonging to the same module tend to be anatomically colocalized [7,8],they cannot explain these effects entirely [94,95].

      Very nice review. Please note the reference [94] (Pantazatos et al.) is misplaced because they did not argue that spatial biases cannot entirely explain the putative links between CGE and functional segregation. Instead, they argued there was insufficient evidence in the original Richiardi et al. study linking elevated CGE with resting state functional networks, and that spatial biases may in fact entirely account for their findings. To describe the debate/exchange more accurately, I would suggest replacing the below sentence

      “While spatial biases may contribute to these findings, as nodes belonging to the same module tend to be anatomically colocalized [7,8], they cannot explain these effects entirely [94,95].”

      with the below paragraph:

      “Spatial biases may contribute to these findings, as nodes belonging to the same module tend to be anatomically colocalized [7,8]. Pantazatos et al. argued that these findings are entirely explained by spatial biases [94]. They showed that elevated CGE, as defined in the original Richiardi et al. study, falls monotonically as longer distance edges are removed. Moreover, they showed that 1,000 sets of randomly spaced modules all have significantly high CGE when using the same null distribution defined in the original Richiardi et al. analyses. Therefore, elevated CGE is not specifically related to functional segregation as defined by resting state functional networks, which is in direct contradiction to the main conclusion of the original Richiardi et al. study. Since randomly placed modules do not align (spatially) with any distributed pattern of functional segregation, the finding of elevated CGE may instead be attributed entirely to anatomical colocalization of the nodes within each module. In their rebuttal to [94], Richiardi et al. argue spatial biases cannot explain their findings entirely [95]. However, the authors do not offer an explanation for significantly high CGE observed for randomly spaced sets of modules, other than to note that nodes tend to be closer on average compared to when modules are defined by resting state fMRI. Future work is required to dissociate the effects of spatially proximity on relationships between CGE and spatially distributed functional networks.”

    1. A stunning thing that we forget, but the link here is not part of the author’s intent, but of the reader’s analysis. The majority of links in the memex are made by readers, not writers. On the world wide web of course, only an author gets to determine links.
  11. Aug 2018
    1. heterogeneous networks have been found to be effective promoters of the evolution of cooperation, since there are advantages to being a cooperator when you are a hub, and hubs tend to stabilize networks in equilibriums where levels of cooperation are high (Ohtsuki et al. 2006), (Pacheco et al. 2006), (Lieberman et al. 2005), (Santos and Pacheco 2005).
    2. For instance, in the study of mobile phone networks, the frequency and length of interactions has often been used as measures of link weight (Onnela et al. 2007), (Hidalgo and Rodriguez-Sickert 1008), (Miritello et al. 2011).

      And they probably shouldn't because typically different levels of people are making these decisions. Studio brass and producers typically have more to say about the lead roles and don't care as much about the smaller ones which are overseen by casting directors or sometimes the producers. The only person who has oversight of all of them is the director, and even then they may quit caring at some point.

    3. First, I will focus in these larger groups because reviews that transcend the boundary between the social and natural sciences are rare, but I believe them to be valuable. One such review is Borgatti et al. (2009), which compares the network science of natural and social sciences arriving at a similar conclusion to the one I arrived.
    1. You might have seen the hashtag #BlackLivesMatter in the previous step. In this 6-minute video, #BlackTwitter after #Ferguson, we meet activists who were involved in the movement and learn about their own uses of Twitter as a platform of protest. Hashtags, when used like this, can be extremely complex in the way they represent ideas, communities and individuals.
    1. Because of both the content that people upload and the behavioral traces that they leavebehind, social network sites have unprecedented quantities of data concerning humaninteraction. This presents unique opportunities and challenges. On one hand, SNSs offera vibrant “living lab” and access to behavioral data at a scale inconceivable to manysocial scientists. On the other, the data that are available present serious research ethicsquestions and introduce new types of biases that must be examined (boyd and Crawford2012)

      The scope and scale of trace data —from settings, public facing fatures, and server-side — presents similar challenges as technological platform changes = new ethics/privacy issues.

    2. For those of us who believe that social network sites are socio-technical systems, in whichsocial and technical factors shape one another, failing to describe the site under studyignores the fact that the technological constraints and affordances of a site will shapeuser practices and that social norms will emerge over time. Not including informationabout what the feature set was at the time of data collection forecloses the possibility ofidentifying patterns that emerge over time and through the accumulated scholarshipacross a range of sites and user samples. Unfortunately, because they have no knowledgeabout how things will continue to evolve and which features will becomeimportant to track, researchers may not be able to identify the salient features to reportand may struggle with devoting scarce publication space to these details, but this doesn’tundermine the importance of conscientious consideration towards describing the artifactbeing analyzed.

      What about documenting technological features/artifacts on a stand-alone website or public repository, like Github to account for page limits?

    3. In order to produce scholarship that will be enduring, the onus is on social mediaresearchers to describe the technological artifact that they are analyzing with as muchcare as survey researchers take in describing the population sampled, and with as muchdetail as ethnographers use when describing their field site. This is not to say thatresearchers must continue to describe technologies as if no one knows what they are—weare beyond the point where researchers must explain how electronic mail or “email” islike or unlike postal mail. But, rather, researchers must clearly describe the socio-technical context of the particular site, service, or application their scholarship isaddressing. In addition to attending to the technology itself, and the interchange betweentechnical and social processes, we believe SNS researchers should make a concertedeffort to include the date of data collection and to describe the site at the moment of datacollection and the relevant practices of its users. These descriptions will enable laterresearchers to synthesize across studies to identify patterns, much in the same wayreporting exact effect sizes allows for future meta-analyses

      Excellent point and important for my SBTF studies.

    4. One key challenge of studying social media is that designers of these tools are innovatingat a very rapid timeframe and often with little advance notice. Given the rapidly changinginfrastructure and the timeframe of academic publishing, the site at the time of datacollection is likely to be very different from its incarnation at the point of publication.

      Challenges of studying SNSs:

      Temporal effects of platform changes.

      Later in the passage, the authors encourage researchers to fully describe the SNS/platform features studied and any potential effects on user behavior, practices, and norms to avoid orphaned research.

    5. Because of howpeople's position within the SNS shapes their experiences of it, activity-centric analysesrequire contextualization and translation, not unlike what social scientists studyingdiffering cultural practices have had to do for decades.

      Challenges of studying SNSs:

      User's position with the social graph shapes experience and interactions.

    6. What oneexperiences on SNSs and the content to which one is exposed differs depending on thestructure of one's network, a user's individual preferences and history, and her activitiesat that moment.

      Challenges of studying SNSs:

      Content varies by network structure, preferences, history and user activity -- but also site technology/upgrades/new features/deprecated features.

    7. By far the most pressing challengefor SNS scholars lies in the rapid pace at which innovations and technical changes areimplemented in this space. For scholarship in this arena to develop, SNS researchersneed to be mindful of the ways in which these sites evolve over time and the effects thismay have on the interpersonal, psychological, and sociological processes they arestudying.

      Challenges of studying SNSs.

      Evolution of site and the way people use it.

    8. What makes “social media” significant as a category is not the technology, butrather the socio-technical dynamics that unfolded as millions of people embraced thetechnology and used it to collaborate, share information, and socialize. Popular genres ofsocial media integrated the public nature of interest-driven CMC with the more intimatedynamics of interpersonal CMC.

      I'm curious why the authors don't mention the UI/UX advancements in SNS that allowed non-technical people to participate online, rather than passively read. Even most blogs in the early 00s were challenging to use, let alone publish on, without some technical savvy.

    9. All SNSs support multiple modes of communication: one-to-many and one-to-one,synchronous and asynchronous, textual and media-based

      This functionality is the make-or-break for collecting user-generated content during humanitarian crises by DHNs.

    10. Many of the weak tie relationships articulatedon SNSs would fade away were it not for the ease with which people can communicate,share, and maintain simple connections. For this reason, this new definition positionssocial network sites first and foremost as a communication platform, while alsohighlighting the importance of sharing content, typically consumed through a stream.

      Evolution of the new definition of social network site emphasizes its use as a communication platform, followed by content sharing.

    11. A social network site is anetworked communication platformin which participants1) haveuniquely identifiable profilesthat consist of user-supplied content, contentprovided by other users, and/or system-level data; 2) canpublicly articulateconnectionsthat can be viewed and traversed by others; and 3) can consume,produce, and/or interact withstreams of user-generated contentprovided by theirconnections on the site.

      Updated social network site definition.

    12. As social network sites have become mainstream, traversing the connections betweenpeople to view profiles is no longer the sole—or, even primary—way of participation.Content is surfaced through streams, and each piece of content is embedded withnumerous links to other content nuggets.

      Streamed content has supplanted the social graph for traversing SNSs.

      Like the API robots, this also contributes to mis/disinformation campaigns that influence on- and offline behavior.

    13. Yet, one significant shift has unfolded: the traversability ofconnections has become more important for machines than users. As APIs make thesocial graph available to broader audiences, algorithms are being designed to traversethe graph and learn about the individual nodes’ relationship to one another.

      For the SNS, crawlers help serve recommended content, ads, search, and drive prediction models.

      Also, very likely contributes to ease of launching mis/disinformation campiagns.

    14. The ability to see—andtraverse—others’ contact lists was innovative and important in several ways. From anadoption perspective, it enabled users to find shared contacts easily, thus lowering thebarriers to initiating contact with other users and enabling users to harness networkeffects more easily. From a social perspective, it allowed people to easily see therelationships between others, to reconnect with old friends and acquaintances, and totravel through the network in a way that enhanced social interactions.

      Value of viewing/traversing connections.

      Early on, this capacity was a critical and defining feature. The default site design is to "display one's articulated network..."

    15. The rise of open APIs and developer platforms meant that these collections of articulatedcontacts became valuable in contexts outside that particular SNS. Engineers andentrepreneurs alike began talking about the “social graph”—the global network oflinkages between all individuals within a system (Fitzpatrick and Recordon2007). Thislanguage emerged at a time when commercial entities began to believe that the socialgraph hadvalue beyond the individual's relationship with a given social networksite.

      Social graph definition.

    16. As SNSs became more popular with a wider range ofindividuals, many individuals’ contact lists became more diverse as these users Friendedpeople representing a range of contexts (family, professional contacts, church members,etc.). This growing diversity has contributed to cases of “context collapse,” whichdescribes the ways in which individuals that we know from different social contexts cometogether in SNSs in potentially uncomfortable ways (Marwick and boyd2011)

      Context collapse definition.

    17. For users, these connections represent what sociologistsrefer to as a person'ssocial network—the collection of social relations of varyingstrengths and importance that a person maintains

      Social network definition.

    18. Earlier communication tools enabled individuals to create a private list ofcontacts (for instance a buddy list on instant messaging), to establish a group of contactsthat were shared by others (such as a listserv membership list), or to publish a list ofrelated links (such as a blogroll), but SNSs extended the practice of creating a publiclyvisible, personally curated list of contacts and made it a mainstream practice.

      Differences between SNS and CMC.

    19. Streams of quotidian,ephemeral content encourage people to participate more in that they provide an initialartifact around which others can engage. Features that support actions associated withstatus updates—the ability to post comments to, share, or register interest in an update—also encourage a stream of activity that is prompted by an update but often takes on a lifeof its own in the central stream. Today's SNSs are more like news aggregators than theyare like profile-based contexts, even if the algorithm for displaying content is quiteobfuscated.

      Essentially, this is the hook to motivate user-generated content.

    20. In boyd and Ellison (2007), we attempted to stabilize the discussion by offeringa definition of social network sites:web-based services that allow individuals to (1) construct a public or semi-publicprofile within a bounded system, (2) articulate a list of other users with whom theyshare a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and thosemade by others within the system.

      Early definition of social network sites. Later Ellison and boyd redefine SNS per evolving Web 2.0 standards, CMC studies and social norms.

    1. Mastodon deliberately does not support arbitrary search. If someone wants their message to be discovered, they can use a hashtag, which can be browsed. What does arbitrary search accomplish? People and brands search for their own name to self-insert into conversations they were not invited to. What you can do, however, is search messages you posted, received or favourited. That way you can find that one message on the tip of your tongue.
    2. So that’s already a huge advantage over other platforms due the basic design. And in my opinion it’s got advantages over the other extreme, too, a pure peer-to-peer design, where everyone would have to fend for themselves, without the pooled resources.

      Definitely something the IndieWeb may have to solve for.

  12. Jul 2018
    1. Then I used Gephi, another free data analysis tool, to visualize the data as an entity-relationship graph. The coloured circles—called Nodes—represent Twitter accounts, and the intersecting lines—known as Edges—refer to Follow/Follower connections between accounts. The accounts are grouped into colour-coded community clusters based on the Modularity algorithm, which detects tightly interconnected groups. The size of each node is based on the number of connections that account has with others in the network.
    2. Using the open-source NodeXL tool, I collected and imported a complete list of accounts tweeting that exact phrase into a spreadsheet. From that list, I also gathered and imported an extended community of Twitter users, comprised of the friends and followers of each account. It was going to be an interesting test: if the slurs against Nemtsov were just a minor case of rumour-spreading, they probably wouldn't be coming from more than a few dozen users.
    1. However, as Mark Poster points out, 'the new level of interconnectivity heightens the fragility of the social net­works. '·50 The source of control now undermines its execu­tion. For clock time to exist and thus to be measurable and controllable there has to be duration, an interval between two points in time. Without duration there is no before and after, no cause and effect, no stretch of time to be measured. The principles of instantaneity and simultaneity of action across space, as I have shown in chapter 3, are encountered in quantum physics; they have no place in the Newtonian world of causality and bodies in motion, the world chat we as embodied beings inhabit. The control of time that has reached the limit of compression has been shifted into a time world where notions of control are meaningless. More like the realm of myths and mysticism, the electronic world of interchangeable no-where and now-here requires knowledge and modes of being that are alien to the industrial way of life. Other modes of temporal existence, therefore, may hold some viral keys, their 'primitive' understanding of time point­ing not ro control but to more appropriate ways of being in the realm of insrantaneity.

      Adam argues that control of time is futile in an interconnected network where hyper-compression has effectively rendered duration/intervals of time as unmeasurable.

      If temporality cannot be "measured, fixed, regulated or controlled" (see timescapes image), then time cannot be controlled.

      Subsequently, we need other approaches to be "in the realm of instantaneity."

    2. 'Interconnectivity', Hassan suggests, 'is what gives the network time its power within culture and society.'32 It is worth quoting him at length here. Network time does not 'kill' or render 'timeless' other tem­poralities, clock-time or otherwise. The embedded nature of the 'multiplicity' of temporalities rbat pervade culture and society, and tbe deeply intractable relationship we have with rhe clock make this unlikely. Rather, the process is one of 'displacement'. Network time constitutes a new and powerful temporality that is beginning to displace, neutralise, sublimate and otherwise upset other temporal relationships in our work, home and leisure environments

      Hassan advances Castells' work on network time and focuses on how the cultural impact/power comes from interconnectivity of the network, not Virilio's emphasis on communication speed.

      In this view, culture and society have multiple temporalities that layer/modify/supercede as globalization, political/work trends, and new technologies take hold.

      Network time is displacing other types of temporal representations, like clock-time.

    3. This network time transforms social time into two allied but distinct forms: simultaneity and timelessness. 29 Simultaneity refers to the globally networked immediacy of communication provided by satellite television and the internee, which makes real-time exchanges possible irrespective of the distances involved. Timelessness, the more problematic concept, refers to the lay­ering of time, the mixing of tenses, the editing of sequences, the splicing together of unrelated events. It points co the general loss of chronological order and context-dependent rhythmicity. It combines eternity with ephemeralicy, real time with contextual change. Castells designates timeless time as 'the dominant temporality of our society'

      Per Castells, network time transforms social time into two forms: simultaneity and timelessness.

      Simultaneity is characterized by global, networked real-time experience augmented by technology. Timelessness is characterized by a non-linear experiences and lack of contextual rhythms. Time is undifferentiated and seems eternal and ephemeral.

      Castells views timelessness as the new dominant temporal culture.

    4. In Castells's analysis, time is not merely compressed but processed, and it is the network rather than acceleration that constitutes the discontinuity in a context of continuing compress10n.

      compressed time vs processed time

      acceleration (speed) vs network time

    5. In a systematic analysis Castells contrasts the clock time of modernity with the network time of the network society.

      clock time vs network time

      Definition of network time, per Hassan (2003): "Through the convergence of neoliberal globalization and ICT revolution a new powerful temporality has emerged through which knowledge production is refracted: network time."

      http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0961463X030122004

  13. course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com course-computational-literary-analysis.netlify.com
    1. laudanum,

      Aw we have discussed before in class, there is a motif of addictive substances, like opium, alcohol and laudanum. It would be interesting to do a word collocation/concordance to in what context these substance arise. I would also be interesting in creating a network of the characters based on these substance to see which characters share the same bad habits!

    2. witnessed

      As we evaluate the many forms of "evidence" that the novel presents, we should ask ourselves how important or meaningful eyewitness accounts are in relation to testimonies, object clues, hearsay, and characters' inferences. An evidence network would allow us to visualize how information interacts and spreads, and modify our epistemological questions and detective work accordingly.

    3. Whether the letter which Rosanna had left to be given to him after her death did, or did not, contain the confession which Mr. Franklin had suspected her of trying to make to him in her life-time, it was impossible to say.

      Letters have been used throughout the text to add detail and action to the narrative. It would be interesting to create some kind of network connecting the senders and receivers of the letters and see which characters are the receivers and relayers of the information they provide. I would imagine Mr. Betteridge would be a major hub, but I think it would be interesting to see how they all connect and relate.

    1. “Beyond financial support, Mozilla offered connections in the network — a way to meet other people working on the same kind of initiatives.”

      Interesting to highlight the value of financial support and network connectivity from the youth perspective.

    2. But Mozilla offered us not only sponsorship but also connections in the network to meet other people who are doing the same kind of initiatives, so we could grow our spot in the education technology space. That was crazy. It’s been awesome.
    3. Although that’s very specific to social media — that aspect of connecting with people — it’s something that the open internet fosters. It’s a sense of community. Not just a community — a space for people to network and find common ground or debate or just to interact with each other in some way, even if they’re not in the same country or place.
    1. “INFORMATION RULES”—published in 1999 but still one of the best books on digital economics—Carl Shapiro and Hal Varian, two economists, popularised the term “network effects”,

      I want to get a copy of this book.

    1. Micro.blog is not an alternative silo: instead, it’s what you build when you believe that the web itself is the great social network.

      So true!!!

  14. Apr 2018
    1. "Similarly on the justice front, we now work with a Legal Aid funded lawyer. If I see that someone has legal concerns of any sort — and these can be very broad from domestic violence issues to family issues to criminal issues — I can refer them straight over to that member of our team."
    1. This fall, my colleagues and I released gobo.social, a customizable news aggregator. Gobo presents you with posts from your friends, but also gives you a set of sliders that govern what news you see and what’s hidden from you. Want more serious news, less humor? Move a slider. Need to hear more female voices? Adjust the gender slider, or press the “mute all men” button for a much quieter internet. Gobo currently includes half a dozen ways to tune your news feed, with more to come.

      Gobo, a proof of concept.

  15. Mar 2018
    1. At the moment, several projects in the space are working to adopt new supplementary protocols, with the intent of building better bridges between one another. The proposed development might end up looking like this:<img class="progressiveMedia-noscript js-progressiveMedia-inner" src="https://via.hypothes.is/im_/https://cdn-images-1.medium.com/max/1600/1*3pEK-Fwq7bNOVcnXfVdNuQ.png">Diaspora at this time has no plans for new protocols, having just significantly upgraded its own. postActiv intends to adopt support for Diaspora federation in a future release. Mastodon just released support for ActivityPub, and Pleroma , Socialhome and GNU Social are thinking of adopting it. Nextcloud is also notably getting into the federation space, and Hubzilla and Friendica will likely both support the ActivityPub protocol as extensions.

      Where we discover that Friendica (and Hubzilla) are clearly the best options for navigating The Free Network.

      It's a shame that the connectivity to Twitter and other non-free networks and services is not better highlighted. It's clearly by being compatible with the non-free networks that the Free Network will win in the end -- by allowing people to escape en masse.

    1. Clavier has been part of that unexpected sequence of events and the network which has stretched around the world has seen me working with colleagues in Egypt, Poland, Sweden, Australia, the USA, Spain, Finland, Canada and the UK! 

      global network connected

    2. . This internal event about teaching excellence at Warwick saw staff exploring physical and virtual spaces, connecting virtually with Marcin Klébin @makle1 in Poland; the doors to the EuroCALL conference were opened this year thanks to collaboration with Maha Bali +Maha Bali and Virtually Connecting, my students have created open educational resources and even contributed to online conferences, the WIHEA #knowhow project (see https://storify.com/WarwickLanguage/warwick-window-on-teaching) produced resources and connections to help others decide on a path to opening up their work.

      Connected events

    3. The Clavier experience had ignited a spark which fed an intellectual curiosity. Central to this was a realisation of my own agency in progressing educational opportunity for all. I decided to be an open educational practitioner and again my network - an international collection of educators in many different contexts - were reliable in getting involved

      Agency and leadership

    4. The serendipity of networked practice together with a heightened attention to the importance of protecting the place of human interaction in education resulted in many conference presentations and publications

      Reflective practice, research, publication

  16. Jan 2018
    1. An interactive network of bibliographic connections between some central proteins of the circadian clock, along with links to some major model organisms.

      Circadian clock proteins

  17. Nov 2017
    1. This new society of information flows can use the internet to disrupt the power dynamics

      I also wonder if digital can work to consolidate power. We tend to think of disruption as a move towards more equality but what if it is a move towards fascism?

  18. Oct 2017
    1. congregational network members take abrokerage role much more often than the secular; accord-ingly, they are more active in providing relations and thetransfer of information between networks

      This is really interesting - and goes along with the hypotheses

  19. Sep 2017
    1. visible is not as effective as addressing the entire system

      Sociologists use the term 'sociological imagination' which refers to our ability to 'see' below the surface of society and to understand the invisible network of norms, values, structures, institutions and systems of inequality that shape individual choice and behavior.

  20. Jul 2017
    1. The point is not to be defeatist, but to remind ourselves again and again that the process is always iterative, and that we must keep working to maintain, to improve, and thus to sustain our work.

      Agreed. This sustain piece is such a hard one to onboard people to if they haven't been privy. Its fun when you see someone get it the first time though :)

    2. How can I add value to this network – contribute, amplify, connect, share, listen, support?

      Totally obvious you believe this - inspiring and awesome!

  21. May 2017
    1. The Triple Feedback Loop offers a compass by aligning the information flows in a framework for operating a network of disparate players with different goals who work together on an overarching goal.

    1. Interesting things are happening over at Mastodon. If you have had your ears tuned to the hacker grapevines, you will most likely have heard that Mastodon is an open source federated social network that works very much like Twitter but is, in fact, not Twitter, and thus poses a challenge to the venerable bird site.
    1. ne critical element in the effectiveness of these networks is “working in the open.” This includes a number of simple practices commonly associated with open source software: making curriculum and tools easy for others to discover; publishing using an editable format that allows others to freely use and adapt them; using an open license like Creative Commons. It also includes a set of work practices that make it easy for people to collaborate across organizations and locations: collaborative writing in shared online documents; shared public plans on wiki or other editable documents; progress reports and insights shared in real time and posted on blogs. These simple practices are the grease that lubricates the network, allowing ideas to flow and innovations to spread. More importantly, they make it possible for people to genuinely build things together—and learn along the way. This point cannot be emphasized strongly enough: when people build things together they tend to own them emotionally and want to roll them out after they are created. If the people building together are from different institutions, then the innovations spread more quickly to more institutions.

      These are all important aspects of open pedagogy, imo. Transparent, network practices that connect, but also create space and opportunities for particiaption by those on the edges. Working in the open is an invitation to particiaption to others.

    2. Rather than selecting a single organization to lead the network, consider a spoke-and-hub or constellation model that empowers teams of organizations to act as “network hubs” for different sectors of the network. The best candidates for these hubs are intermediary organizations that act in the best interests of the network, allowing other network members to focus on their core mission and programmatic activities. Hub organizations play several roles. As conveners, they bring people together and build the field. As catalysts, they invest money and resources to get new ideas off the ground or help exciting projects to develop. As communicators, hub organizations enhance networks members’ ability to tell their story effectively and efficiently, internally and externally. As champions, hubs lift up the accomplishments of network actors, regionally, nationally, and internationally. And, as coordinators, hub organizations connect the dots, recommend priorities for the network, and connect those priorities to national resources.

      This could describe BCcampus - a hub organization that connects networks

  22. Mar 2017
    1. They then went and did a marvellous job, networking for themselves.

      networking

    2. Today we were having synchronised breakfast with our partners in Warwick University. 

      colleagues connection collaboration

    3. I arrived in class to find our partner librarians ready to teach our students. 

      Colleagues. connection. mutualisation.

    4. Rather than learning from #ccourses to develop #clavier, I am beginning to understand that #clavier and #ccourses and #ds106 and the whole caboosh is actually the same thing.

      Personal learning network. Overlapping communities/networks

    5. Meeting new colleagues with whom I could have fun teaching was high up on my 'would love to' list.

      Network colleagues

    1. to my students (they are unaware of that for the moment unless the one Tweep has done his job for the masses and sent it viral in Clermont Ferrand STAPS).

      connection individual witness

    2. Then it was Maha's Birthday, why don't we sing 'Happy Birthday' I thought, - well why not?

      Distant Presence Friends

    1. The words of one of my students, one of my fellow learners helped me continue. Those words, some of them, are translated here in this post Nagasaki mon amour.

      There is no going back. We must go forward.

      The key issues concern the data collection/policing of our conversations.

    1. a network [une grille]

      Nice, I like the appearance of "network" here in this musing about "code", especially after our last class discussion about ambiguity ("code" is inherently ambiguous...) being entangled with itself, and ultimately supported by "spider webs" and "nets" and "molten masses" of various communications, à la Burke and Perelman.

  23. Feb 2017
    1. Comparison of ITCD algorithms is challenging when there are differences in study focus, study area, data applied, and accuracy assessment method used. Before 2005, the few studies that compared methods generally tested approaches on a common dataset.

      This difficulty in comparing algorithms (due to differences in forest type, location, and assessment strategy used for different algorithms) indicates a clear need for set of open data and centralized assessment to allow different methods to be competed against one another to determine the best routes forward.

      This kind of approach has been very successful in other image analysis problems (e.g., ImageNET).

      The National Ecological Observatory Network data seems ideal for doing something like this. Data is/will be available for a variety of different systems and with LiDAR, Hyperspectral, RGB, and field data for large numbers of plots.

    2. Additionally, it is often challenging to apply an algorithm developed in one forest type to another area.

      This difficulty of applying across forest types is central to the challenges of developing approaches that can be applied to continental scale data collection like that being conducted by NEON. Overcoming this challenge will likely require incorporating ecological information into models, not just the remote sensing, and determining how to choose and adjust different approaches to get the best delineations possible based on information about the forest type/location.

    3. The most useful information that can be incorporated into ITCD studies is the expected crown size and stand density [25,67].

      This kind of data is available for NEON plots and so these methods could potentially be well leveraged with NEON data. This would be particularly true if the NEON plot data could be used to develop a spatial model for these features that could be used to predict their values across space.

  24. www.digitalrhetoriccollaborative.org www.digitalrhetoriccollaborative.org
    1. connections

      Connectivity, we may recall, often appears within network theories as a guiding logic for decentralizing (and destabilizing) structures. In contrast to prior systems which often situate manifestations of "control" in hierarchical frames, Alexander Galloway in Protocol examines connectivity as a mechanism for inclusion/exclusion (amongst other articulations of "control"). Like Galloway, Helms seems to be looking at logics of connectivity within (and beyond) comics to expand critical theory in productive ways.

  25. Jan 2017
    1. Asking questions via social media that are intentionally designed to elicit responses can provide a plethora of useful responses. Why wait until an end-of-year survey to find out about an issue when you can poll/question students throughout the year via social media?

      It doesn't have to be just student feedback about the operations and mechanics of the course, or as a replacement for a course survey tool. You can also use the platform as a way to engage students on the content relevant to the learning outcomes of the course. And use the platform to connect learners with people in the field of study.

    1. Fiction is a spreading, polysemous, relational network that captures the way that we and our worlds create each other.
  26. Sep 2016
    1. A network perspective not only lays bare the various stakeholders with a vested social, economic, and political interest in what happens within schools and colleges, but also the ways agency for what happens within classrooms at my institution extends beyond the students and educators charged with constructing learning.

      Useful approach (reminiscent of ANT), especially if paired with a community-based approach.

  27. Jun 2016
    1. It’s a human/machine partnership that works as follows.

      Sounds like there’s been a bit of a move towards partnership, recently. But much discourse on automation is about the complete exclusion of human intervention.

    1. Volunteer Coaches recruit teams of girls to work with female mentors.

      A lot hinges on those mentors. Apparently, they’re not exclusively technical, which might be an important point. The mentoring is a big part of the learning experience, surely. But there’s a certain level of complexity involved when we start discussing mentorships.

  28. Apr 2016
  29. Feb 2016
    1. So while the extroverts may be schmoozing with colleagues after work, you can ensure you’re being productive while you recharge by reading industry journals or thinking creatively about your company and your career.

      translation: it's okay to say no to professional networking opportunities even when your goal is to improve your professional networking. Radical! (no sarcasm)

  30. Jan 2016
    1. ВЫВОДЫ

      <br>

      • Все комплектующие адаптера должны быть последнего поколения. К высокоскоростному Wi-Fi 802.11ac должен прилагаться высокоскоростной же USB 3.0, тогда и в двухантенном адаптере есть смыл.

      • Если комплектующие разных поколений. Высокоростной Wi-Fi 802.11ac + низкоскоростной USB 2.0 дадут ⩽ 270 Мбит/с и не больше. В двухантенном смысла нет.

      • Если все комплектующие предыдущих поколений. Средне- и низкоскоростные Wi-Fi 802.11 a/b/g/n (не ac) + низкоскоростной USB 2.0 — есть смысл в двухантенном адаптере. <br>

      Но для получения максимальных результатов адаптер должен принимать сигнал от роутера, соответствующего характеристикам адаптера. То есть поколение роутера тоже должно соответствовать.

    2. Минусом работы на 5 ГГц может быть уменьшение дальности работы (по сравнению с 2,4 ГГц), но этот вопрос мы в данной статье не затрагивали и постараемся вернуться к нему в следующих публикациях.
    3. Конечно, не забывайте, что и роутер должен соответствовать этому уровню.
    4. Если же адаптер работает в ПК или ноутбуке по интерфейсу USB версии 3.0, то скоростные показатели заметно интереснее — до 450 Мбит/с и выше.
    5. в случае работы с шиной USB 2.0 пользователи сетей 802.11ac могут рассчитывать на максимальные скорости около 270 Мбит/с. При этом особого смысла гнаться за двухантенным (скорость соединения 867 Мбит/с) адаптером практически нет. Единственное, где он может выиграть у одноантенного (скорость соединения 433 Мбит/с) — работа с сетями прошлого поколения.
    6. Если вы пользуетесь ноутбуком, встроенный беспроводной адаптер которого обеспечивает работу в 802.11n/300 Мбит/с (а таких моделей в среднем сегменте большинство), то установка внешнего контроллера может помочь существенно увеличить скорость работы с сетью, и подобный апгрейд может быть оправдан.
  31. Dec 2015
  32. Sep 2015