40 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2020
  2. Jun 2020
  3. May 2020
    1. But the scariest outcome of the centralization of information in the age of social networks is something else: It is making us all much less powerful in relation to governments and corporations.
  4. Apr 2020
    1. Huge web properties were started during this era including Yahoo, Google, Amazon, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. In the process, the importance of centralized platforms like AOL greatly diminished.
  5. Mar 2020
    1. The aim has always been to help decentralise the internet and provide a platform that hands control back to users.
    1. Over time, ICANN has begun to favor the interests of companies like Verisign, owners of .com, instead of users. Worse, they recently favored the sale of .org, a domain extension used by a huge number of important global non profits, to a private equity firm with many former ICANN employees.
  6. Feb 2020
    1. Something important to notice about this article. Not a single person here is linked to using their own website, or via a link to their presence on any of their respective decentralized networks.

      All the people whose names are linked are linked to on Twitter. All of the people who've written pieces or articles linked to in this piece are writing on Medium.com and not on their own sites/platforms.

      How can we honestly be getting anywhere if there isn't even a basic identity for any of these people on any of these decentralized networks?

      At least most of the projects seem to have websites, so that's a start. But are any of them dogfooding their own products to do so? I suspect not.

  7. Jun 2019
    1. I imagine that the first part of this project will focus on how it got to be this way, what got missed or ignored in some of the early warnings about what was happening online and how those warnings were swamped by the hype depicting the Internet as a space of radical democratization.

      I love the brewing idea here. We definitely need this.

      Some broad initial bibliography from the top of my head:

      Larry Sanger (co-founder of Wikipedia)

      Some useful history/timelines: https://indieweb.org/timeline https://indieweb.org/history

  8. Apr 2019
    1. I like the spirit of proof-of-stake because it tries to solve the problem, but I’m going to point out two things: Proof-of-stake is not yet proven, and, prior to proof-of-work, nobody was sure that decentralized consensus was possible. When proof-of-work gained acceptance, computer scientists were running naked in the streets with excitement. Therefore I default to extreme skepticism - but I’ll keep my eye out for any nerdy-looking streakers. Anybody who’s been involved in crypto-currencies for more than a year who smoothly transitions from “PoW is a great revolution” to “obviously PoW was never the long term solution” deserves a hard poke in the eye for the duration of my choosing.

      by Paul Frazee

  9. Mar 2019
  10. Feb 2019
    1. The future we're fighting for has no analog in mainstream tech, and so it's hard to articulate our strategy using their words. I know that we can feel it, though-- when a new person suddenly gets what we are attempting to do, it is like two instruments slowly coming into tune.
    2. The philosophy of the modern web has saturated our world so thoroughly that corporate goals have the appearance of common sense
    1. Avant-Pop artists welcome the new Electronic Age with open arms because we know that this will vastly increase our chances of finding an audience of like-minded individuals who we can communicate and collaborate with
    2. Soon the Data Superhighway will finally once and for all do away with the high-priced middlemen, and artists will reap the benefits of their own hard-earned labor. The distribution formula will radically change from Author - Agent - Publisher - Printer - Distributor - Retailer - Consumer to a more simplified and direct Author (Sender) - Interactive Participant (Receiver)
    3. The emerging wave of Avant-Pop artists now arriving on the scene find themselves caught in this struggle to rapidly transform our sick, commodity-infested workaday culture into a more sensual, trippy, exotic and networked Avant-Pop experience. One way to achieve this would be by creating and expanding niche communities. Niche communities, many of which already exist through the zine scene, will become, by virtue of the convergent electronic environments, virtual communities. By actively engaging themselves in the continuous exchange and proliferation of collectively-generated electronic publications, individually- designed creative works, manifestos, live on-line readings, multi- media interactive hypertexts, conferences, etc., Avant-Pop artists and the alternative networks they are part of will eat away at the conventional relics of a bygone era where the individual artist- author creates their beautifully-crafted, original works of art to be consumed primarily by the elitist art-world and their business- cronies who pass judgement on what is appropriate and what is not.
    4. something else is starting to take hold in the cultural imagination
    1. My dream is to have people inspired to make webpages again about whatever they'd like, and share them in ways that don't promote competitive, addictive 'engagement stats'. And to have cyber-regional zine libraries that are collecting and supporting different scenes' work
    2. to visit a dat site, much like reading a zine, requires that you ask for it from the creator of it (or be a part of a culture that is supporting and sharing them)
    3. There is no implicit way to discover dat sites--instead you have to share your link with friends and hope they support, seed, and share the link too. A dat site spreads, then, through classic, social and 'underground' channels
    4. Work with what you have, to support the people around you and together you'll create a community that has a defined shape and form only in hindsight. Instead of worrying about having enough onboarding ramps, I say we make a future space that is so exciting, so fun, that is such a cool party with lights so bright that everyone wants to build their own methods to get here and join in. And I thought: what's the coolest, most party thing in the world? Reading.
    5. The future I want is decentralized, consensual, anarchist, feminist, and cool
  11. Jan 2019
    1. Freedom to organizeAragon lets you freely organize and collaborate without borders or intermediaries. Create global, bureaucracy-free organizations, companies, and communities.
    2. The world’s first digital jurisdictionAragon organizations are not only great because they are decentralized, global and unstoppable. They will also benefit from the Aragon Network, the world’s first digital jurisdiction.

      "digital jurisdiction"

  12. Nov 2018
    1. We need to learn to see the cumulative impact of a multitude of efforts, while simultaneously keeping all those efforts visible on their own. There exist so many initiatives I think that are great examples of how distributed digitalisation leads to transformation, but they are largely invisible outside their own context, and also not widely networked and connected enough to reach their own full potential. They are valuable on their own, but would be even more valuable to themselves and others when federated, but the federation part is mostly missing. We need to find a better way to see the big picture, while also seeing all pixels it consists of. A macroscope, a distributed digital transformation macroscope.

      This seems to be a related problem to the discovery questions that Kicks Condor and Brad Enslen have been thing about.

  13. Jul 2018
    1. This summer, Web activists plan to convene at the second Decentralized Web Summit, in San Francisco.

      This will be very interesting, I imagine!

    2. For now, the Solid technology is still new and not ready for the masses. But the vision, if it works, could radically change the existing power dynamics of the Web. The system aims to give users a platform by which they can control access to the data and content they generate on the Web. This way, users can choose how that data gets used rather than, say, Facebook and Google doing with it as they please. Solid’s code and technology is open to all—anyone with access to the Internet can come into its chat room and start coding.
  14. Apr 2017
  15. Jul 2016
    1. To put it plainly, no reputation system is resistant to a Vendor purchasing their own items and making false-positive ratings.This is especially true of a pseudonymous decentralized marketplace, where Buyer identities are — by default — undisclosed. Even a web-of-trust model, which is excellent at detecting suspicious islands of ‘reputable’ users, will not be able to distinguish between real and fake ratings of a Vendor.

      Maybe all reputation schemes that try to assign a globally valid rating to users will be bad. Perhaps the only solution is to let the context fall and do not perform any kind of calculation/assignment.