36 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Prior to the adoption of the Cross-Origin Resource Sharing (CORS) standard, JSONP was the only option to get a JSON response from a server of a different origin.
  2. Nov 2020
    1. In July 2010, Microsoft let go Jimmy Schementi, one of two remaining members of the IronRuby core team, and stopped funding the project.[19][20] In October 2010 Microsoft announced the Iron projects (IronRuby and IronPython) were being changed to "external" projects and enabling "community members to make contributions without Microsoft's involvement or sponsorship by a Microsoft employee".
    1. React didn't support rendering arrays without a wrapper for most of its existence 16.0.0 (September 26, 2017): Components can now return arrays and strings from render.
  3. Oct 2020
    1. In React 0.12 time frame we did a bunch of small changes to how key, ref and defaultProps works. Particularly, they get resolved early on in the React.createElement(...) call. This made sense when everything was classes, but since then, we've introduced function components. Hooks have also make function components more prevalent. It might be time to reevaluate some of those designs to simplify things (at least for function components).
    1. Facebook’s React has an optional language extension that enables you to embed HTML inside JavaScript. This extension can make your code more concise, but it also breaks compatibility with the rest of the JavaScript ecosystem. ECMAScript 6 will have template strings [1], which enable you to implement JSX (or something close to it) inside the language.
    1. The misspelling of referrer originated in the original proposal by computer scientist Phillip Hallam-Baker to incorporate the field into the HTTP specification.[4] The misspelling was set in stone by the time of its incorporation into the Request for Comments standards document RFC 1945; document co-author Roy Fielding has remarked that neither "referrer" nor the misspelling "referer" were recognized by the standard Unix spell checker of the period.
  4. Sep 2020
    1. Why do we use bundlers again?Historically, bundlers have been used in order to support CommonJS files in the browser, by concatenating them all into a single file. Bundlers detected usages of require() and module.exports and wrap them all with a lightweight CommonJS runtime. Other benefits were allowing you to serve your app as a single file, rather than having the user download several scripts which can be more time consuming.
    1. It was called a "virtual DOM" library because it didn't start out as isomorphic, but actually tied to the DOM from the start. It was an afterthought to make it isomorphic.
  5. Aug 2020
    1. Let us quickly travel back in time to 2016. SWOOSH! We are there. JavaScript landscape looks like this: If you are using a JavaScript framework or want to use a framework, Angular.js is probably something you would choose. But, the news about Angular 2 that will make you rewrite almost everything is just around the corner. Also, this new kid on the block - React.js is coming up and getting ripe. Of course, Vanilla JS and no-framework-folks are there. Not using a framework is still a popular opinion in 2016, but is slowly fading.
  6. May 2020
    1. The Journal was a primitive hypertext-based groupware program, which can be seen as a predecessor (if not the direct ancestor) of all contemporary server software that supports collaborative document creation (like wikis). It was used by ARC members to discuss, debate, and refine concepts in the same way that wikis are being used today.
    1. The folks at Netlify created Netlify CMS to fill a gap in the static site generation pipeline. There were some great proprietary headless CMS options, but no real contenders that were open source and extensible—that could turn into a community-built ecosystem like WordPress or Drupal. For that reason, Netlify CMS is made to be community-driven, and has never been locked to the Netlify platform (despite the name).

      Kind of an unfortunate name...

  7. Apr 2020
    1. In the early 1990s, the creators of Netscape apparently built a function that enabled each web page to be annotated by those visiting it, as a way for viewers to discuss the page’s content. But according to a [1] produced in 2013 by a nonprofit called [Hypothesis][2], the feature was turned off.
    1. for-profit tech companies — most notably Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon (GAFA) — built software and services that rapidly outpaced the capabilities of open protocols
    2. Huge web properties were started during this era including Yahoo, Google, Amazon, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. In the process, the importance of centralized platforms like AOL greatly diminished.
  8. Jan 2020
  9. Dec 2019
  10. Nov 2019
    1. The language for writing React. Reason's creator also created ReactJS, whose first prototypes were written in SML, a distant cousin of OCaml. We've transcribed ReactML into ReactJS for wide adoption. A few years later, we're now iterating on the future of ReactJS through ReasonReact.
    1. the main reason we built a new multiprocess architecture is that Chromium's multiprocess support was never contributed to the WebKit project. It has always lived in the separate Chromium tree, making it pretty hard to use for non-Chrome purposes.Before we wrote a single line of what would become WebKit2 we directly asked Google folks if they would be willing to contribute their multiprocess support back to WebKit, so that we could build on it. They said no.
  11. Jul 2017
  12. Dec 2016
    1. Now,thesuggestedexecutiontimeforaBASICprogrammaticsolutiontoPuzzle15is7minutes,4seconds.That'sontheVectra.IfyouareprogrammingonaTandy1000,youcouldexpectthesameprogramtoexecuteinabout28minutes.So,ifyoursolutiontakesoveranhour,youmighttrytospeeditupsomewhat.

      How times have changed! Project Euler suggested run times of less than a minute, but here the author blithely suggests that waiting an hour for your solution may be too much.

    Tags

    Annotators