23 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. (at least right now)

      This is very worrying. For a document that lays out how bad it is if your personal knowledge repository must rely on some company's existence to conclude with the implication that in the future the tool won't work in offline mode is distressing.

  2. Apr 2018
    1. TheVflagmaybedirectlyresetbymeansoftheCLV(clearoverflow)instruction.Oddly,thereisnoequivalentinstructiontosettheflag.OnespecialfeatureoftheVflag:onsome650xchips,theVflagcanbesetbyhardware.Thereisapinonthechipthatcanbe usedsothatanexternallogicsignalwilltriggertheVflag.

      What is the use of this feature?

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    1. And even though this seems to violate all sorts of cherished physical assumptions, Einstein needn’t move over – relativity isn’t called into question, because only a portion of the signal is affected.

      Surely messaging at FTL speeds is still impossible, so this must be either a misreporting or else the whole thing is nonsense.

    1. We published everything we learned, as we learned it.

      "Publish everything as soon as you learn it" is not a description of responsible journalism.

  3. Oct 2017
    1. Multiple administration officials told me there was a lengthy debate inside the Trump administration about the summit, but officials close to Trump were concerned the president did not want to stay in the region for so long and worried he could get cranky, leading to unpredictable or undiplomatic behavior.
  4. Jul 2017
    1. This is a very useless article. A paragraph-by-paragraph summary:

      Geeks like scifi.

      I like scifi, too.

      "We create it because we can."

      Hackers exist.

      We use the internet for a lot of things, and hackers exist.

      People use technology on the road.

      People use technology at the beach.

      People use technology while chasing Pokemon over a cliff.

      "...all tech companies serious about ethical grounding need to be hiring folks with backgrounds in areas like anthropology, psychology and philosophy."

      It'd be nice if tech were more "thoughtful in its engagement with our lives and the world".

      People should consider the impact of technology? Well, obviously. But Bajarin offers not the slightest idea of how to do that, or what a more responsible tech world might look like.

      Except insofar as ethics falls within the domain of philosophy, he doesn't give any reason "Why We Need the Liberal Arts in Technology's Age of Distraction". What do students of classics have to teach us about Instagram? How does literary theory apply to consuming facebook posts? What can an anthropologist do for tumblr? Tell us!

  5. Jan 2017
    1. Itistimefortheengineerstogobacktoengineering.

      I do not think it is precisely Norman's intent here, but: I have seen a number of times the attitude that when engineers (programmers, geeks of some stripe) have invented something useful, they ought to get out of the way so that the important people can take advantage of it. In a discussion on the use of git by authors and other non-programmers, I saw more than once a comment to the effect of "as usual, programmers ruined a great idea by making something no one can use"--the quality of git's design aside, the tool was made and found useful by the programmers, who after all invented it for their own use.

      This isn't to say that I don't agree that people familiar with other disciplines have much to contribute to the technical fields. In "Space for Poets", published in the March 1979 issue of OMNI, Trudy E. Bell makes the case that room should be made on the space shuttle for not only scientists but also for humanists, including poets. The point is compelling, though it presupposes a thriving shuttle program that unfortunately never materialized.

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    1. The fourth level at which religion can be found in video games, is the ritual level: playerswho are involved in in-game behavior that is traditionally associated with religion.

      This is the most interesting idea in the article. I would frame it somewhat differently, however: this seems to conflate religious actions by the player character with religious actions by the player.

      The observation that players can engage in religious behavior in the digital space is a good one. These may be sincere religious activities that take place in-game, or the semblance thereof, performed for dramatic reasons.

      Sincere religious activities may be explicit, e.g. evangelism in a multiplayer game, or implicit, e.g. choosing the player character's actions according to the player's own religious imperative. The memorials mentioned in the article probably fall under this category, with religion broadly construed.

      Anthony's section on allopolitical games (p. 41) is relevant.

    2. The fourth step is external research, the gathering of all out-game information that is notprovided by the developers of the game themselves

      This step combines ethnography (e.g. watching playthroughs by other players) with a study of the existing literature, which seems an oddly careless combination for a process that somehow distinguished between 'playing the game' and 'playing the game, but really paying attention this time'.

    3. In the third step, external reading, the gamer/researcher must become less of a gamer andmore of a researcher. His or her identity as a researcher takes over from his or her identity as aplayer.

      However, those materials (e.g. novels) are intended to be experienced by the players of the game as players of the game. For games with a focus on world-building, this kind of 'research' is in fact an ordinary component of 'play'.

    4. The second step is internal research: collection of all the in-game information, for example(the list is not exhaustive), texts, audio, video, pictures, NPC stories, and such like.

      It is not clear how this step is differentiated from the first step. Reading the in-game text, talking to the NPCs, and other such actions are an ordinary part of playing the game, surely. If the first step involves "playing the game multiple times (playthroughs), including main quest (mission) and side quests (missions), reaching every possible ending", then what remains to do? This only makes sense if, in the first step, you are meant to play the game repeatedly without paying any particular attention to it, so that you miss all the little details.

    5. Methodology of Studying Religion in Digital Games

      The approach outlined in this section seems reasonable enough, but has no specific relationship to the study of religion in games. It is also a rather obvious approach: first, study the source material (i.e. the game); next, study other primary source material from the creator of the game; last, study secondary materials.

    6. Despite its interesting nature, Anthony’stypology cannot – as we will see – cover all cases of religion in video games or ofscholarly research of them.

      Bosman does not make explicit any examples which this typology does not cover; he does not mention it again. The statement is accurate, but beside the point. Bosman's system is more akin to Ferdig's than Anthony's, describing the religious content rather than the category of game, so his categories are orthogonal to Anthony's.

    7. video gamesare digital systems that have the following features

      This seems to be a misreading of Ryan. She enumerates these four elements as "properties of digital systems . . . that [she regards] as the most relevant for narrative and textuality", but does not, I think, expect that all games should exhibit every property.

    8. What is a video game?

      It will be nice when the day comes that articles about video games needn't spend a few pages meditating on the nature of their subjects. I don't feel that this section contributes substantially to the main work of the article; the discussion on how to study religion in video games, and the framework for its description, would not have suffered if the details of the definition of 'video game' were neglected.

    1. The Mass Effect series (BioWare, 2007–) may be one of the best ex-amples of t his type. Some have noted that the overarching game riffs on the Christ narrative; the protagonist, a space warrior named Shepherd, dies and is reborn to save humanity.

      While I don't disagree with the observation, describing Commander Shepard as "a space warrior named Shepherd" is both inaccurate and shallow.

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  6. Dec 2016
    1. Warped Space11 was notable for a report on the Chicago convention, and a letter from Leslie Fish, a professional writer and singer, who was to make many contributions to fanzines. Leslie wrote that she did not know about Star Trekfandom until she attended the Chicago convention.

      In Trek fandom, Leslie Fish would become notable for several K/S works, including "Shelter", published the following year in Warped Space 20.

    2. This issue had a story by Paula Block titled, "The Quality of Mercy, or Spock Must NOT Die!"

      The title of this story surely refers to Blish's "Spock Must Die!", published in 1970. It would be good to know if the story is a response to that book.

    3. Another item of interest in the first issue of Spockanaliawas "The Territory of Rigel," a Ni Var poem by Dorothy Jones. She explained the poem as follows: "'Ni Var' literally means 'two form,' and it is basically a piece comparing and contrasting two aspects of the same thing."
    4. Meanwhile, Spockanalia5 ran an important article, "Concerning Sehlats" by Lee Burwasser. In this piece, the author looks at precedents in nature to see what sort of animal would have six-inch fangs. The author concludes, "And so our portrait of the sehlat: a carnivore or just possibly tushed omnivore, general shape that of a giant panda, size on the order of an Alaskan brown bear, highly intelligent, and despite the six-inch fangs, of a patient and gentle disposition.... Question: did the sehlat belong toSpock, or was Spock in the care of the sehlat?" The Star Trekproduction staff read this article, and animators incorporated many of the suggestions into the drawing of the sehlat I-Chaya in the animated episode, "Yesteryear."
    5. But thehighlight of Eridani Triad2, was the article, "The Vulcan Love Story, or Being in Pon FarrMeans Never Having to Say You're Sorry," by Doris Beetem. This witty article analyzed all the fanzine stories written and published that had the same general plot:that is, girl-meets-Spock, girl-beds-Spock. The article attributed Spock's attraction to the theory that Spock fit the "Gothic Hero" prototype in romantic fiction, and asserted that therefore it was natural for fans to fantasize about Spock along those lines (and to write up their fantasies as stories).
    1. Not once have I ever had the time to ask myself, "Are my songs literature?"

      In a 1965 interview, Dylan was asked "Do you think of yourself primarily as a singer or a poet?". He responded, "Oh, I think of myself more as a song and dance man, y'know."

    1. Now,thesuggestedexecutiontimeforaBASICprogrammaticsolutiontoPuzzle15is7minutes,4seconds.That'sontheVectra.IfyouareprogrammingonaTandy1000,youcouldexpectthesameprogramtoexecuteinabout28minutes.So,ifyoursolutiontakesoveranhour,youmighttrytospeeditupsomewhat.

      How times have changed! Project Euler suggested run times of less than a minute, but here the author blithely suggests that waiting an hour for your solution may be too much.

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