7 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2019
    1. I would rather you vote against my position because you had an opposing view than vote with my position because you flipped a coin.
    2. Before each election, I have traditionally written up an analysis of the California ballot measures and send it to my friends. It's not always obvious what the "real" agenda is on each one, and even with clear purposes there are often competing interests at play. These writings are the result of my own analysis, which comes from a libertarian perspective, and I'm not knowingly affiliated with any party behind any ballot measure. I believe that mere lists of "vote yes" or "vote no" are not very helpful except for sheep: it's important to know why one is urged to vote in any given direction. I would rather you vote against my position because you had an opposing view than vote with my position because you flipped a coin.
  2. Nov 2019
  3. Mar 2019
    1. It would be nice if comments and annotations could be voted by people, and have the possibility to sort them chronologically etc.

  4. Feb 2019
  5. Sep 2018
  6. Apr 2017
    1. qualified voters

      "Qualified voters" meant almost exclusively white men. As the former colonies began the process of writing state constitutions, debates over who should be included as a "qualified voter" often divided conventions. Vermont and Pennsylvania had two of the most liberal constitutions. Vermont permitted all men, regardless of color, to vote, while Pennsylvania permitted all white men to vote regardless of income. Other states, like Maryland, had much more restrictive qualifications for voting and required that free white men also hold property.