19 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
    1. many applicants for aposition will not have direct experience of the work in their target profession. Nor will they havegained a title that is explicitly targeted toward that new position. To be able to assess these kinds ofapplicants, employers want insight into which specific skills and experiences of a presenter may betransferable to new contexts. This includes skills a candidate may have gained outside of formaleducation, for example through professional development programs, on-the-job training,volunteering experience or experiences in their other professions

      A big part of the WHY that too many issuers do not address. Authoring metadata with the consumer in mind will give our Earners a competitive advantage.

    2. They also need to communicate their potential, i.e., what they are able to learn, as well as toreceive guidance on how to realize their potential

      Fascinating idea of systems not only serving to inform learners/earners about where they can go and how to get there, but to also be a reliable signal about their potential to advisors, councilors, social workers, navigators, parents, recruiters and others

    3. employers see potential value in using digital credentials for a number of differentreasons. These include using digital credentials to better match candidates to jobs by analyzingtheir skills, broadening the talent funnel by data-mining credential databases, ensuring theauthenticity of credentials, and using credentials to manage the talent pathways in theirorganizations

      reminder that stakeholders are not monolithic and neither is any given stakeholder's incentive structure. Yes, keep it simple when mapping out stakeholder ecosystem. And, include multiple incentives when relevant.

  2. Oct 2022
  3. Aug 2022
    1. https://www.kevinmarks.com/memex.html

      I got stuck over the weekend, so I totally missed Kevin Marks' memex demo at IndieWebCamp's Create Day, but it is an interesting little UI experiment.

      I'll always maintain that Vannevar Bush really harmed the first few generations of web development by not mentioning the word commonplace book in his conceptualization. Marks heals some of this wound by explicitly tying the idea of memex to that of the zettelkasten however. John Borthwick even mentions the idea of "networked commonplace books". [I suspect a little birdie may have nudged this perspective as catnip to grab my attention—a ruse which is highly effective.]

      Some of Kevin's conceptualization reminds me a bit of Jerry Michalski's use of The Brain which provides a specific visual branching of ideas based on the links and their positions on the page: the main idea in the center, parent ideas above it, sibling ideas to the right/left and child ideas below it. I don't think it's got the idea of incoming or outgoing links, but having a visual location on the page for incoming links (my own site has incoming ones at the bottom as comments or responses) can be valuable.

      I'm also reminded a bit of Kartik Prabhu's experiments with marginalia and webmention on his website which plays around with these ideas as well as their visual placement on the page in different methods.

      MIT MediaLab's Fold site (details) was also an interesting sort of UI experiment in this space.

      It also seems a bit reminiscent of Kevin Mark's experiments with hovercards in the past as well, which might be an interesting way to do the outgoing links part.

      Next up, I'd love to see larger branching visualizations of these sorts of things across multiple sites... Who will show us those "associative trails"?

      Another potential framing for what we're all really doing is building digital versions of Indigenous Australian's songlines across the web. Perhaps this may help realize Margo Neale and Lynne Kelly's dream for a "third archive"?

  4. May 2022
  5. Feb 2022
  6. Jan 2022
    1. Organizations as varied as Y Combinator, MIT’s Radiation Lab, and ARPA have astonishing track records in catalyzing progress far beyond their confines.

      Are they really the ones pushing the progress and innovating, or are they benefiting from filtering out only the highest level potential producers and simply supporting them?

      Would we get more overall benefit from raising the level of the ocean so that all boats rise instead of a select few?


      Another example, how was Hungary able to produce so many Nobel Prize winners?

  7. Dec 2021
  8. May 2021
  9. commonplace.knowledgefutures.org commonplace.knowledgefutures.org
    1. This almost appears to be a small, community-based commonplace book.

      And apparently published on PubPub.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Samuel Klein</span> in Samuel Klein on Twitter: "@flancian See also https://t.co/KMmU7pDuQx" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>05/18/2021 19:30:42</time>)</cite></small>

  10. May 2020
  11. Apr 2020
  12. Aug 2019
    1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology launched its OpenCourseWare initiative in 2000, which made materials from all of the university’s courses freely available on the internet

      MIT since 2000

  13. Jul 2019
  14. Mar 2018
    1. The other important change people typically undergo at MIT is the broad realization that they “can’t do it alone.” Note that these are people who generally did a lot of that before they arrived in Kendall Square. Now, however, they are among others who get what they want to do and have the skills to help. MIT reinforces that basis for connection by immediately making it impossible for students to succeed solo. Study groups form immediately and spontaneously in the face of its infamous “p-sets” (or problem sets). By putting students through an extraordinarily hard process when they’re freshman and sophomores it forces humility and compels them to rely on the strengths of other people. Think of it as the intellectual equivalent of Marine boot camp—the individual finds his or her limits, and viscerally discovers the value of the team.
  15. Jan 2017
  16. Jun 2016
    1. (Who is “we”?)

      As per the linked post:

      Using Snow’s essay as a jumping off point, I want to consider a problem that’s been on my mind a great deal since joining the MIT Media Lab five years ago: how do we help smart, well-meaning people address social problems in ways that make the world better, not worse?

      Not to defend Ethan, but he’s typically quite explicit about such thing. At least, he doesn’t evade responsibility.

      From his about page (also in narrative version in the Do Not Track doc):

      Those annoying pop-up windows? My fault, at least in part. I designed a vertically-oriented popup window that included navigation tools and an ad for inclusion on webpages at some point in late 1996 or early 1997. It was intended to be less intrusive than inserting an ad into the middle of a user’s homepage. I won’t claim responsibility (irresponsibility?) for inventing the damned things, and I disclaim any responsibility for cascading popups, popups that move to the top, and those annoying “bot” windows that open different popups every few minutes. Still, the fault is at least in part mine, and I’m sorry. :-)

  17. Mar 2016