30 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2022
    1. This system of short annotations was conceived to de-contextualize information and free it from pre-structured meaning frames that would otherwise remove the possibility of further variety. Moreover, it could be expanded without limits in terms of both number and possible meaning combinations. Finally, it allowed a continuous (and recur-sive) improvement of open-ended combinatory performances, thereby shift-ing the burden of recollection from contents to indexing systems.74

      In a valuable article, Lorraine Daston, ‘Perché i fatti sono brevi?’, Quaderni storici 108 (2001), 745–70, esp. 756–59, noted that a clear analogy exists between these features and the art of excerpting.

      Can one trick oneself into forced context collapse with relation to the material one is reading in such a way so as to force surprise and the creation of new ideas by then re-contextualizing them into one's system of notes?

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  2. Dec 2021
    1. When the user stores his thoughts in his own filing cabinet, these thoughts are no longer his own but those of his filing cabinet. In turn, the machine that gathers and reproduces excerpts is, and remains, a ‘black box’. It is not simply another Ego for enacting a user’s soliloquy but a true Alter Ego with whom the user communicates. Additionally, when the machine is started, the user does not simply refresh his memory; the filing cabinet actually speaks. To achieve this practical outcome, the card index must be provided with a ‘life of its own’ (Eigenleben) which should be as independent of the life of its educator as possible.30 In this sense, the card index functions as a ‘secondary memory’ in Stübel’s terms. This result raises some questions which justify the present article. Is there a socio-structural reason why such an improbability became possible? Is there a trend, in early and late modern society, toward an externalization and technologizing of social memory? And what insight can we gain into intellectual history?

      I'm not completely sure I can agree with this. Perhaps I'm missing part of his point?

      There is a quirky relationship here to the idea of a personbyte, the complete amount of information and knowledge a person can have. Even misty memories that a person can remember or be reminded of are part of this knowledge. Perfect recall isn't necessary as some things can potentially be reconstituted with some thought towards recreation of an idea.

      Compare this with the idea of epic poetry and song of the Yugoslavian guslars. Some may be more artful than others, but at what point are they telling a new story?

    2. In short, the core hypothesis that I would like to explore is that there is nothing particularly surprising in the contemporary use of a card index as a surprise generator. Indeed, the question should be instead: how it is possible to explain the evolutionary improbability of the social use of ‘machines’ as secondary memories for knowledge management and reproduc-tion?

      The key question Alberto Cevolini is exploring here.

    3. The main hypothesis is that in the use of a card index as a surprise generator, there is nothing particularly surpris-ing if one considers the evolution of knowledge management in early modern Europe.

      This is what I have been arguing all along as I've been doing my research as well.

    1. “In 2022, the fall out of the Covid-19 pandemic will continue to have an impact on manufacturing and the global supply chain. The long, erratic wait times will not go away anytime soon, especially as more variants emerge and potentially disrupt international travel and shipping routes. 
  3. Nov 2021
    1. Generate type with the index signature: interface RandomMappingWithIndexSignature { stringProp: string; numberProp: number; [propName: string]: string | number | undefined; }
  4. Jul 2021
    1. Irritation: basically, without surprise or disappointment there’s no information. Both partners have to be surprised in some way to say communication takes place.

      This is a basic tenet of information theory. Interesting to see it appear in a work on writing.

  5. Jun 2021
  6. Jan 2021
  7. Sep 2020
    1. What I believe should happen is the Svelte compiler should, when a promise is passed to onMount, realise that a promise has been passed, and await the result of the function to be used as the onDestroy function. i.e, it should behave the exact same way for an async function as it does for a non-async function (if this is possible)
    1. The main rationale for this PR is that, in my hones opinion, Svelte needs a way to support style overrides in an intuitive and close to plain HTML/CSS way. What I regard as intuitive is: Looking at how customizing of styles is being done when applying a typical CSS component framework, and making that possible with Svelte.
  8. Jul 2020
    1. It’s even worse that there’s no alternative method that does the unsurprising thing IMO.
    2. The "unsurprising" thing here would generally be to maintain the order, for instance, and subtract the first or last instance...
    3. Code doing surprising and slightly nonsensical things... I'm weary now. And that's with ruby being more consistent than most!
  9. Jun 2020
  10. May 2020
  11. Mar 2019
  12. Feb 2019
  13. Dec 2018
    1. working part-ner

      The farmer's wife is a "working partner" not his employee. That seems like an audacious statement for the time. Was it?

  14. Nov 2018
    1. We don't mind using the terms Doctor, Professor, Brother, Rev. -anything hut Mr., Mrs. or Miss.

      I found this surprising. I would think using titles like Doctor and Professor would have been considered just as objectionable as Mr., Mrs., and Miss.

  15. Sep 2018
  16. Nov 2017
    1. Nobody knew whether it would become a lasting national tradition

      another instance that surprises us since we thought Thanksgiving was a lasting national tradition since the first feast in 1692.

  17. Jan 2017
    1. The Foucault reading surprised me because I never thought of self writing as a rhetorical activity.

      It is always a pleasure to be surprised by something we are reading, and I am glad you are noting your reaction to a reading here.

  18. Nov 2016
    1. Il y a deux semaines, c’était l’anniversaire de mon meilleur ami. Elle étudie à Davidson. Deux semaines avant son anniversaire, elle m’a demandé de visiter pour son anniversaire, mais j’ai dit que je ne pouvais pas. Pendant les deux semaines, j’ai parlé avec mon autre ami à Davidson et je lui ai surprise. Elle était très heureuse et surprise! Mon ami et moi, nous avons planifié la surprise très bien. C’était un très bon weekend.

  19. Apr 2016
    1. 38% of Americans who describe themselves as “single and looking” have used an online-­dating site.

      This number seems staggeringly low compared to my experience with friends. Really? I may look this stat up or find out where it comes from.

    2. along with the sociologist Eric Klinenberg

      Aziz is doing research?! I'm visualizing him doing a focus group interviewImage Description

    3. Happily so—and probably more so than most people I know who had nonarranged marriages.

      This surprises me. Sounds like Aziz is skeptical of "natural" love. Will he be making an argument for algorithmic match-making?