5 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
    1. Thirty years later again it was the gold double watch-chain which was the symbol of the successful Lib-Lab trade union leader; and for fifty years of disciplined servitude to work, the enlightened employer gave to his employee an engraved gold watch. I

      Lib-Lab : a member of the British Liberal party in the late 19th century belonging to or supporting the trade-union movement

      Talking about the 1820s. Early origins of giving watches to long time employees.

    2. the timepiece was the poor man's bank, an investment of savings: it could, in bad times, be sold or put in hock.51 "This 'ere ticker", said one Cockney compositor in the I820S, "cost me but a five-pun note ven I bort it fust, and I've popped it more than twenty times, and had more than forty poun' on it altogether. It's a garjian haingel to a fellar, is a good votch, ven you're hard up".52 Whenever any group of workers passed into a phase of improving liv

      Early example of a watching being a store of value and credit.

    3. Atkins and Overall, op. cit., pp. 302, 308 - estimating (excessively?) 25,000 gold and io,ooo silver watches imported, mostly illegally, per annum; and Anon., Observations on the Art and Trade of Clock and Watchmaking (London, 1812), pp. 16-20.

      He mentions earlier that decorated timepieces were more valuable/common than accurate ones. This begins to put timepieces into the area of fashion rather than function. Perhaps there wasn't yet need for more accuracy, but the fact that watches were being made of gold and silver shows a market need for the fashion over function. Was there a market for simpler steel or cheaper metal watches at this time?

  2. Sep 2017