3 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2016
    1. There was a culture then, almost a requirement, that one needed to build platforms and contexts (social or political) to support one’s thesis, and then material practice would follow. These issues were pressing, because by this time I had begun to teach at Cooper Union. I was negotiating between promoting a rigorous painting model and a new context—conversations with students and colleagues about contemporary art issues and institutional critique. So it was a very complicated time for me as an educator, to figure out how to insist on a conversation about painting rigor in relation to contemporary art. I continued to go the way that I needed to with my own work, both protecting it from the institutional framework and furthering my ideas about painting in school and in the studio—it was a tough, amazing time.
  2. Jun 2016
    1. In 2014, the Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles, released a report showing that New York City public schools are among the most segregated in the country.

      Here's a relevant quote from this study: "Schools with mostly zoned students generally reflect neighborhood segregation patterns. Those with the means to attend less disadvantaged schools are also often the more advantaged students or families, which increases the segregation within CSDs and the city." There is so much that would be possible to study around these issues. What a rich multi-disciplinary (history, law, politics, statistics, English) project this could be! Here's another interesting source that is distracting me from Hannah-Jones's essay: http://editorial-ny.dnainfo.com/interactives/2014/12/diversity/diversity-frame.html Try this: go to any neighborhood, and start with All Schools, then go to Middle Schools, then High Schools. Notice the green dots (schools with Whites) disappearing? Of course in Bedford-Stuyvesant, where Hannah-Jones lives, this stays the same across the different ages -- only Black-dominant schools are available.