22 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
    1. Parts of Speech

      adv. An adverb is a word or an expression that modifies a verb, adjective, another adverb, determiner, clause, preposition, or sentence. Adverbs typically express manner, place, time, frequency, degree, level of certainty, etc., answering questions such as how?, in what way?, when?, where?, and to what extent?.

      n. A noun is a word that functions as the name of a specific object or set of objects, such as living creatures, places, actions, qualities, states of existence, or ideas. However, noun is not a semantic category, so it cannot be characterized in terms of its meaning.

      pron. In linguistics and grammar, a pronoun is a word that substitutes for a noun or noun phrase. Pronouns have traditionally been regarded as one of the parts of speech, but some modern theorists would not consider them to form a single class, in view of the variety of functions they perform cross-linguistically.

      adj. In linguistics, an adjective is a word that modifies a noun or noun phrase or describes its referent. Its semantic role is to change information given by the noun.

      v. A verb, from the Latin verbum meaning word, is a word that in syntax conveys an action, an occurrence, or a state of being. In the usual description of English, the basic form, with or without the particle to, is the infinitive. In many languages, verbs are inflected to encode tense, aspect, mood, and voice.

      prep. Prepositions and postpositions, together called adpositions, are a class of words used to express spatial or temporal relations or mark various semantic roles.

      conj. In grammar, conjunction is a part of speech that connects words, phrases, or clauses that are called the conjuncts of the conjunctions. The term discourse marker is mostly used for conjunctions joining sentences.

      det. A determiner, also called determinative, is a word, phrase, or affix that occurs together with a noun or noun phrase and serves to express the reference of that noun or noun phrase in the context.

    1. glossolalia

      Merriam-Webster define glossolalia as

      ecstatic, typically unintelligible utterance occurring especially in a moment of religious excitation —usually plural

    1. ecstatic, typically unintelligible utterance occurring especially in a moment of religious excitation —usually plural

      Glossolalia.

  2. Mar 2021
    1. Consonant Pronunciation

      b - boy / ban

      c - chat / ceeb

      d - dog / dara

      f - fire / fas

      g - good / agsi

      j - job / jox

      k - keep / kaani

      l - land / lakk

      m - mark / naam

      n - nice / àdduna

      ñ - genius / gaañ

      p - paint / puso

      r - rat / raxas

      s - soup / kawas

      t - take / tubaab

      w - wait / kéwél

      x - (see note below) / xaalis

      y - yes / yaa

      There is no English equivalent for this sound, it is a slightly guttural sound that is between x and k. It may also be pronounced merely as h, especially among non-natives.

      mb - mbaa

      mp - dàmp

      nd - ndey

      ng - ngan

      nj - njaay

      ŋ - masoŋ

      Prenasalized consonants don't exist in English the way they do in Wolof. ng and ŋ sound almost the same if not the same. Words like sing, bring, king, mango, etc. are the closest to this sound.

    2. Please add to this project by annotating non-highlighted Wolof entries with a corresponding audio file. Thank you!

    3. Vowel Pronunciation

      a - absorb / sant

      aa - far / laaj

      e - get / dem

      ee - where / seet

      é - say / bés

      ée - sane / wéer

      ë - bird / kër

      i - pit / fit

      ii - meet / siis

      o - moment / fomp

      ó - no / jóg

      oo - door / loos

      óo - phone / fóon

      u - cook / ubbi

      uu - moon / juuyoo

    4. Primary source for audio files:

      https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Wolof_pronunciation

      Secondary source for audio files:

      http://shtooka.net/overview.php?lang=wol

    5. Attribution for audio files: Mamadou Sy [CC BY 2.0 fr], via Wikimedia Commons

  3. Sep 2020
      • A dictionary is also like a list where in list only one type of variables need to be and in dictionaries there can be almost any type in one set.
      • A dictionary contains a collection of indices which are called keys and keep any values.
      • In dictionary we use curly brackets and in lists we use square brackets.
      • In a dictionary we can use for loop and it traverse the keys of dictionary.
      • In a dictionary another name for a ey value is pair.
      • Implementation a way of performing a computation.
      • HASHTABLE-The algorithm used to implement python dictionaries.
  4. Aug 2020
  5. May 2020
  6. Oct 2019
    1. Where the house is cold and empty and the garden’s overgrown,   They are there.

      Examiners usually come in after an accident has happened, basically like official review to make sure they have enough to help them. So in line one when it says "where the house is cold and empty and the garden's overgrown, they are there" gives you sign that something has happened but all we know is "They are there."

  7. Sep 2019
  8. Jul 2019
    1. An ungrounded, dangerous separation of joy from happiness has infiltrated the Christian community. The following is typical of the artificial distinctions made by modern Christians:
  9. Apr 2017
    1. Dictionary definitions give us an idea of how unstable the concepts are that can be signified by Signifyin(g).

      I imagine this instability results from signifyin as being a living rhetorical mode, something that is constantly evolving as it is practiced; I think it also suggests how oral and everyday it is--signifyin' and its different forms are in practice in everyday conversations among African Americans. It's difficult to capture something so oral and performative in something as rigid as definitions.

  10. Mar 2017
    1. Moreover, Woolf believes that the principal language available for literary and intellectual expression has been "the language of men,"s so long used to express only men's concerns that women have difficulty adapting it to their needs.

  11. Sep 2016
    1. The use of they/them to identify a single person, rather than two or more people, has not been without controversy.Maryland state education official Andy Smarick made headlines earlier this month after sharing his thoughts via Twitter on Merriam-Webster Dictionary’s use of the singular “they” when referring to one of the dictionary’s staffers.“The singular they is an affront to grammar. Language rules are all that separates us from animals. We. Must. Stand. Firm,” Smarick wrote in a tweet that has since been deleted.The dictionary retorted in a tweet: “Then you’re talking to the wrong dictionary — we’re descriptivists. We follow language, language doesn’t follow us.”

      Smarick vs. Webster's prescriptivism debate

  12. Dec 2015
  13. cityheiress.sfsuenglishdh.net cityheiress.sfsuenglishdh.net
    1. run him through the Lungs

      The act of stabbing someone, with the intent to kill them.

      Image Description

    2. Coxcombs

      People who present themselves in a grandiose manner, but are seen as vain fools who lack true knowledge or valid achievements; fops.

    3. fisking and giggiting

      To move in a swift manner or to scamper about.