41 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. May 2022
  3. Apr 2022
    1. wik2dict is a tool written in Python that converts MediaWiki SQL dumps into the DICT format. The script is available under the GNU General Public License. It is also capable of downloading Wikipedia, Wiktionary, Wikiquote, Wikinews and Wikibooks SQL dumps.
  4. Mar 2022
  5. Feb 2022
    1. You read the dictionary’s thesaurian list of synonyms

      This is what I often do, and I'm frequently frustrated there aren't any alternative words for many expressions that capture the same thing.

      Like the author here, it never occurred to me that a good dictionary would be a solution, since I never saw one.

    1. We need to getour thoughts on paper first and improve them there, where we canlook at them. Especially complex ideas are difficult to turn into alinear text in the head alone. If we try to please the critical readerinstantly, our workflow would come to a standstill. We tend to callextremely slow writers, who always try to write as if for print,perfectionists. Even though it sounds like praise for extremeprofessionalism, it is not: A real professional would wait until it wastime for proofreading, so he or she can focus on one thing at a time.While proofreading requires more focused attention, finding the rightwords during writing requires much more floating attention.

      Proofreading while rewriting, structuring, or doing the thinking or creative parts of writing is a form of bikeshedding. It is easy to focus on the small and picayune fixes when writing, but this distracts from the more important parts of the work which really need one's attention to be successful.

      Get your ideas down on paper and only afterwards work on proofreading at the end. Switching contexts from thinking and creativity to spelling, small bits of grammar, and typography can be taxing from the perspective of trying to multi-task.


      Link: Draft #4 and using Webster's 1913 dictionary for choosing better words/verbiage as a discrete step within the rewrite.


      Linked to above: Are there other dictionaries, thesauruses, books of quotations, or individual commonplace books, waste books that can serve as resources for finding better words, phrases, or phrasing when writing? Imagine searching through Thoreau's commonplace book for finding interesting turns of phrase. Naturally searching through one's own commonplace book is a great place to start, if you're saving those sorts of things, especially from fiction.

      Link this to Robin Sloan's AI talk and using artificial intelligence and corpuses of literature to generate writing.

  6. Jan 2022
    1. https://vimeo.com/232545219

      from: Eyeo Conference 2017

      Description

      Robin Sloan at Eyeo 2017 | Writing with the Machine | Language models built with recurrent neural networks are advancing the state of the art on what feels like a weekly basis; off-the-shelf code is capable of astonishing mimicry and composition. What happens, though, when we take those models off the command line and put them into an interactive writing environment? In this talk Robin presents demos of several tools, including one presented here for the first time. He discusses motivations and process, shares some technical tips, proposes a course for the future — and along the way, write at least one short story together with the audience: all of us, and the machine.

      Notes

      Robin created a corpus using If Magazine and Galaxy Magazine from the Internet Archive and used it as a writing tool. He talks about using a few other models for generating text.

      Some of the idea here is reminiscent of the way John McPhee used the 1913 Webster Dictionary for finding words (or le mot juste) for his work, as tangentially suggested in Draft #4 in The New Yorker (2013-04-22)

      Cross reference: https://hypothes.is/a/t2a9_pTQEeuNSDf16lq3qw and https://hypothes.is/a/vUG82pTOEeu6Z99lBsrRrg from https://jsomers.net/blog/dictionary


      Croatian acapella singing: klapa https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sciwtWcfdH4


      Writing using the adjacent possible.


      Corpus building as an art [~37:00]

      Forgetting what one trained their model on and then seeing the unexpected come out of it. This is similar to Luhmann's use of the zettelkasten as a serendipitous writing partner.

      Open questions

      How might we use information theory to do this more easily?

      What does a person or machine's "hand" look like in the long term with these tools?

      Can we use corpus linguistics in reverse for this?

      What sources would you use to train your model?

      References:

      • Andrej Karpathy. 2015. "The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Recurrent Neural Networks"
      • Samuel R. Bowman, Luke Vilnis, Oriol Vinyals, et al. "Generating sentences from a continuous space." 2015. arXiv: 1511.06349
      • Stanislau Semeniuta, Aliaksei Severyn, and Erhardt Barth. 2017. "A Hybrid Convolutional Variational Autoencoder for Text generation." arXiv:1702.02390
      • Soroush Mehri, et al. 2017. "SampleRNN: An Unconditional End-to-End Neural Audio Generation Model." arXiv:1612.07837 applies neural networks to sound and sound production
  7. Nov 2021
  8. dictionary.cambridge.org dictionary.cambridge.org
    1. an example of a product, especially a computer program or piece of recorded music, given or shown to someone to try to make them buy or support it: a software demo

      I prefer this to the Merriam-Webster definition.

  9. Sep 2021
    1. saxophone

      a metal musical instrument that you play by blowing into it and pressing keys to produce different notes

    2. dotted

      a small, round mark or spot:

    3. snapped

      If something long and thin snaps, it breaks making a short, loud sound, and if you snap it, you break it, making a short, loud sound:

    4. confidence

      a feeling of being certain of your ability to do things well:

    5. swirled

      to move around and around quickly, or to make something do this:

  10. Apr 2021
    1. Parts of Speech

      adv. An adverb is a word or an expression that modifies a verb, adjective, another adverb, determiner, clause, preposition, or sentence. Adverbs typically express manner, place, time, frequency, degree, level of certainty, etc., answering questions such as how?, in what way?, when?, where?, and to what extent?.

      n. A noun is a word that functions as the name of a specific object or set of objects, such as living creatures, places, actions, qualities, states of existence, or ideas. However, noun is not a semantic category, so it cannot be characterized in terms of its meaning.

      pron. In linguistics and grammar, a pronoun is a word that substitutes for a noun or noun phrase. Pronouns have traditionally been regarded as one of the parts of speech, but some modern theorists would not consider them to form a single class, in view of the variety of functions they perform cross-linguistically.

      adj. In linguistics, an adjective is a word that modifies a noun or noun phrase or describes its referent. Its semantic role is to change information given by the noun.

      v. A verb, from the Latin verbum meaning word, is a word that in syntax conveys an action, an occurrence, or a state of being. In the usual description of English, the basic form, with or without the particle to, is the infinitive. In many languages, verbs are inflected to encode tense, aspect, mood, and voice.

      prep. Prepositions and postpositions, together called adpositions, are a class of words used to express spatial or temporal relations or mark various semantic roles.

      conj. In grammar, conjunction is a part of speech that connects words, phrases, or clauses that are called the conjuncts of the conjunctions. The term discourse marker is mostly used for conjunctions joining sentences.

      det. A determiner, also called determinative, is a word, phrase, or affix that occurs together with a noun or noun phrase and serves to express the reference of that noun or noun phrase in the context.

    1. glossolalia

      Merriam-Webster define glossolalia as

      ecstatic, typically unintelligible utterance occurring especially in a moment of religious excitation —usually plural

    1. ecstatic, typically unintelligible utterance occurring especially in a moment of religious excitation —usually plural

      Glossolalia.

  11. Mar 2021
    1. Consonant Pronunciation

      b - boy / ban

      c - chat / ceeb

      d - dog / dara

      f - fire / fas

      g - good / agsi

      j - job / jox

      k - keep / kaani

      l - land / lakk

      m - mark / naam

      n - nice / àdduna

      ñ - genius / gaañ

      p - paint / puso

      r - rat / raxas

      s - soup / kawas

      t - take / tubaab

      w - wait / kéwél

      x - (see note below) / xaalis

      y - yes / yaa

      There is no English equivalent for this sound, it is a slightly guttural sound that is between x and k. It may also be pronounced merely as h, especially among non-natives.

      mb - mbaa

      mp - dàmp

      nd - ndey

      ng - ngan

      nj - njaay

      ŋ - masoŋ

      Prenasalized consonants don't exist in English the way they do in Wolof. ng and ŋ sound almost the same if not the same. Words like sing, bring, king, mango, etc. are the closest to this sound.

    2. Please add to this project by annotating non-highlighted Wolof entries with a corresponding audio file. Thank you!

    3. Vowel Pronunciation

      a - absorb / sant

      aa - far / laaj

      e - get / dem

      ee - where / seet

      é - say / bés

      ée - sane / wéer

      ë - bird / kër

      i - pit / fit

      ii - meet / siis

      o - moment / fomp

      ó - no / jóg

      oo - door / loos

      óo - phone / fóon

      u - cook / ubbi

      uu - moon / juuyoo

    4. Primary source for audio files:

      https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Wolof_pronunciation

      Secondary source for audio files:

      http://shtooka.net/overview.php?lang=wol

    5. Attribution for audio files: Mamadou Sy [CC BY 2.0 fr], via Wikimedia Commons

  12. Sep 2020
      • A dictionary is also like a list where in list only one type of variables need to be and in dictionaries there can be almost any type in one set.
      • A dictionary contains a collection of indices which are called keys and keep any values.
      • In dictionary we use curly brackets and in lists we use square brackets.
      • In a dictionary we can use for loop and it traverse the keys of dictionary.
      • In a dictionary another name for a ey value is pair.
      • Implementation a way of performing a computation.
      • HASHTABLE-The algorithm used to implement python dictionaries.
  13. Aug 2020
  14. May 2020
  15. Oct 2019
    1. Where the house is cold and empty and the garden’s overgrown,   They are there.

      Examiners usually come in after an accident has happened, basically like official review to make sure they have enough to help them. So in line one when it says "where the house is cold and empty and the garden's overgrown, they are there" gives you sign that something has happened but all we know is "They are there."

  16. Sep 2019
  17. Jul 2019
    1. An ungrounded, dangerous separation of joy from happiness has infiltrated the Christian community. The following is typical of the artificial distinctions made by modern Christians:
  18. Apr 2017
    1. Dictionary definitions give us an idea of how unstable the concepts are that can be signified by Signifyin(g).

      I imagine this instability results from signifyin as being a living rhetorical mode, something that is constantly evolving as it is practiced; I think it also suggests how oral and everyday it is--signifyin' and its different forms are in practice in everyday conversations among African Americans. It's difficult to capture something so oral and performative in something as rigid as definitions.

  19. Mar 2017
    1. Moreover, Woolf believes that the principal language available for literary and intellectual expression has been "the language of men,"s so long used to express only men's concerns that women have difficulty adapting it to their needs.

  20. Sep 2016
    1. The use of they/them to identify a single person, rather than two or more people, has not been without controversy.Maryland state education official Andy Smarick made headlines earlier this month after sharing his thoughts via Twitter on Merriam-Webster Dictionary’s use of the singular “they” when referring to one of the dictionary’s staffers.“The singular they is an affront to grammar. Language rules are all that separates us from animals. We. Must. Stand. Firm,” Smarick wrote in a tweet that has since been deleted.The dictionary retorted in a tweet: “Then you’re talking to the wrong dictionary — we’re descriptivists. We follow language, language doesn’t follow us.”

      Smarick vs. Webster's prescriptivism debate

  21. Dec 2015
  22. cityheiress.sfsuenglishdh.net cityheiress.sfsuenglishdh.net
    1. run him through the Lungs

      The act of stabbing someone, with the intent to kill them.

      Image Description

    2. Coxcombs

      People who present themselves in a grandiose manner, but are seen as vain fools who lack true knowledge or valid achievements; fops.

    3. fisking and giggiting

      To move in a swift manner or to scamper about.