27 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2019
  2. Sep 2019
    1. “Hitting the wall” is a term that is being increasingly used to describe women who have reached an age where men no longer find them sexually attractive.

      "The wall" is a persistent meme in right wing male circles, but it seems to me like a paltry consolation for undesirable guys (MGTOW) to delude themselves. If the wall is real, who is maintaining it and for what purpose? Even grannies can find men to keep them company. They just don't want the kind of man who would want their wrinkly asses.

  3. Nov 2018
    1. Creating KGs is not trivial.

      This applies to universal KG in particular. Domain specific KGs can have any level of complexity - can they still be called knowledge graphs then?

    Tags

    Annotators

  4. Oct 2018
    1. One obvious question is what people mean by “political correctness.” In the extended interviews and focus groups, participants made clear that they were concerned about their day-to-day ability to express themselves: They worry that a lack of familiarity with a topic, or an unthinking word choice, could lead to serious social sanctions for them. But since the survey question did not define political correctness for respondents, we cannot be sure what, exactly, the 80 percent of Americans who regard it as a problem have in mind.
    2. It seems like everyday you wake up something has changed … Do you say Jew? Or Jewish? Is it a black guy? African-American? … You are on your toes because you never know what to say. So political correctness in that sense is scary.
  5. Dec 2017
  6. Nov 2017
    1. Heteroscedasticity

      Heteroscedasticity is a hard word to pronounce, but it doesn't need to be a difficult concept to understand. Put simply, heteroscedasticity (also spelled heteroskedasticity) refers to the circumstance in which the variability of a variable is unequal across the range of values of a second variable that predicts it.

  7. Apr 2017
    1. usage of this term has changed over time; we need to operationally define it for the purposes of our article or perhaps even for research support/data services

  8. Mar 2017
    1. Eskimo

      The word Eskimo has historically been used to refer to the native peoples of Alaska and other Arctic regions, including Siberia, Canada, and Greenland. It comes from a Central Algonquian language called Ojibwe, a language still spoken around the Great Lakes region on both sides of the U.S.- Canadian border. However, the word has a controversial history. People in many parts of the Arctic consider Eskimo a derogatory term because it was widely used by racist, non-native colonizers. Many thought that it meant eater of raw meat, which implied barbarism and violence. In America the word is still commonly used in Alaska while in Canada and Greenland using the word is offensive and racist. Canadians and Greenlanders prefer to use other terms. Aboriginal refers to the first inhabitants of Canada, including First Nations, Inuit, and Métis. First Nation is a term used to describe Aboriginal peoples who are neither Métis nor Inuit. First Nation came to common usage in the 1970s and ‘80s to replace the term Indian. Inuit refers to the people generally living in the far north who are not considered “Indians” under Canadian law. Inuit means people and is the most commonly used. The singular, which means “person,” is Inuk. The term Métis refers to a collective of cultures and ethnic identities that resulted from unions between Aboriginal and European peoples in what is now Canada.

      Citations

      Joseph, Bob. "Indigenous Peoples terminology guidelines for usage." Indigenous Peoples terminology guidelines for usage. Accessed March 08, 2017. http://www.ictinc.ca/blog/indigenous-peoples-terminology-guidelines-for-usage.

  9. Jan 2017
    1. preservice teachers

      What does "preservice teacher" refer to in this context? I associate these two terms together with either an undergraduate student who is working towards licensure or a student doing a post-bac licensure program. Is that the same meaning here?

  10. Oct 2016
    1. bricolage

      See Dictionary.com

      noun, plural bricolages [bree-kuh-lah-zhiz, ‐lahzh] (Show IPA), bricolage. 1. a construction made of whatever materials are at hand; something created from a variety of available things. 2. (in literature) a piece created from diverse resources. 3. (in art) a piece of makeshift handiwork. 4. the use of multiple, diverse research methods.

    2. nihilism

      See the Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

      Short explanation from IEP: Nihilism is the belief that all values are baseless and that nothing can be known or communicated. It is often associated with extreme pessimism and a radical skepticism that condemns existence. A true nihilist would believe in nothing, have no loyalties, and no purpose other than, perhaps, an impulse to destroy. While few philosophers would claim to be nihilists, nihilism is most often associated with Friedrich Nietzsche who argued that its corrosive effects would eventually destroy all moral, religious, and metaphysical convictions and precipitate the greatest crisis in human history. In the 20th century, nihilistic themes--epistemological failure, value destruction, and cosmic purposelessness--have preoccupied artists, social critics, and philosophers. Mid-century, for example, the existentialists helped popularize tenets of nihilism in their attempts to blunt its destructive potential. By the end of the century, existential despair as a response to nihilism gave way to an attitude of indifference, often associated with antifoundationalism.

      It has been over a century now since Nietzsche explored nihilism and its implications for civilization. As he predicted, nihilism's impact on the culture and values of the 20th century has been pervasive, its apocalyptic tenor spawning a mood of gloom and a good deal of anxiety, anger, and terror. Interestingly, Nietzsche himself, a radical skeptic preoccupied with language, knowledge, and truth, anticipated many of the themes of postmodernity. It's helpful to note, then, that he believed we could--at a terrible price--eventually work through nihilism. If we survived the process of destroying all interpretations of the world, we could then perhaps discover the correct course for humankind.

    3. homosocial bond

      Per Webster: "of, relating to, or involving social relationships between persons of the same sex and especially between men"

    4. mise-en-scen

      Film studies terminology. See this reference guide:

      MISE-EN-SCENE Mise en scène encompasses the most recognizable attributes of a film – the setting and the actors; it includes costumes and make-up, props, and all the other natural and artificial details that characterize the spaces filmed. The term is borrowed from a French theatrical expression, meaning roughly “put into the scene”. In other words, mise-en-scène describes the stuff in the frame and the way it is shown and arranged. We have organized this page according to four general areas: setting, lighting, costume and staging. At the end we have also included some special effects that are closely related to mise-en-scène.

    5. Kinesthetics

      see Dictionary.com

      noun

      1. the sensation of movement or strain in muscles, tendons, and joints; muscle sense.
    6. Cinema of Attractions

      Terminology borrowed from film theory. See explanations here and here.

    7. phenomenologies

      See Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

      Short explanation: "Phenomenology is the study of structures of consciousness as experienced from the first-person point of view. The central structure of an experience is its intentionality, its being directed toward something, as it is an experience of or about some object. An experience is directed toward an object by virtue of its content or meaning (which represents the object) together with appropriate enabling conditions.

      Phenomenology as a discipline is distinct from but related to other key disciplines in philosophy, such as ontology, epistemology, logic, and ethics. Phenomenology has been practiced in various guises for centuries, but it came into its own in the early 20th century in the works of Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty and others. Phenomenological issues of intentionality, consciousness, qualia, and first-person perspective have been prominent in recent philosophy of mind."

    8. deniable rep-resentation
    9. synechdochically

      "synecdoche" (dictionary.com)

      noun, Rhetoric.

      1. a figure of speech in which a part is used for the whole or the whole for a part, the special for the general or the general for the special, as in ten sail for ten ships or a Croesus for a rich man.
  11. May 2016
  12. Feb 2016
    1. horizontal collaboration

      Terminology note: For Brown, 'horizontal' seems to reference the sometimes-at-tension network and protocol theories, where network theorists sometimes neglect to consider how protocols assemble nodes into hierarchies, (i.e.,compose edges/structures). In short, power and social relations are not distributed "horizontally" / cast in pure lines.

  13. May 2014
    1. Triton Shared Computing Cluster Triton Shared Computing Cluster (TSCC) is a new computational cluster for research computing available through UC San Diego's RCI program. Designed as a turnkey, high performance computing resource, it features flexible usage and business models and professional system administration. Unlike traditional clusters, TSCC is a collaborative system wherein the majority of nodes are purchased and shared by the cluster users, known as condo owners. In addition to the participant-contributed condo nodes, TSCC has a collection of hotel nodes which are available to condo owners and to other researchers on a rental basis. The condo and hotel configurations contain both standard two-socket nodes and GPU nodes. The hotel configuration also features eight 512GB large-memory nodes. The table below provides a brief technical summary of TSCC.

      SDSC Triton Share Computing Cluster (TSCC) uses both condo and hotel terminology.

  14. Nov 2013
    1. occulta

      Interesting choice of terms.

      Definition: "occult": of, involving, or relating to supernatural, mystical, or magical powers or phenomena