10 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2021
    1. Snaps each pick a ‘base’, for example, Ubuntu18 (corresponding to the set of minimal debs in Ubuntu 18.04 LTS). Nevertheless, the choice of base does not impact on your ability to use a snap on any of the supported Linux distributions or versions — it’s a choice of the publisher and should be invisible to you as a user or developer.

      Snaps sound a lot like container images in this respect.

  2. Jul 2020
  3. May 2020
    1. Image consumers can enable DCT to ensure that images they use were signed. If a consumer enables DCT, they can only pull, run, or build with trusted images. Enabling DCT is a bit like applying a “filter” to your registry. Consumers “see” only signed image tags and the less desirable, unsigned image tags are “invisible” to them.
    1. In the examples below, we are using Docker images tags to specify a specific version, such as docker:19.03.8. If tags like docker:stable are used, you have no control over what version is going to be used and this can lead to unpredictable behavior, especially when new versions are released.
    1. It is a multi-stage image which reproduces the following operations:Construction of the artefacts in a build imageAvailability of the compilation process in a minimal image