51 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2024
    1. This article does not get into the detailed pros and cons of the Docker daemon process.  There is much to be said in favor of this approach and I can see why, in the early days of Docker, it made a lot of sense.  Suffice it to say that there were several reasons why Docker users were concerned about this approach as usage went up. To list a few: A single process could be a single point of failure. This process owned all the child processes (the running containers). If a failure occurred, then there were orphaned processes. Building containers led to security vulnerabilities. All Docker operations had to be conducted by a user (or users) with the same full root authority.
    1. Personally I’m not a fan of running migrations in an ENTRYPOINT script.I think it’s best suited to run this separately as part of your deploy process
  2. Feb 2024
    1. What happens to the page layout now that the book is beingused as a container for many discrete pieces of information, ratherthan for a single, continuous narrative?

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  3. Mar 2023
    1. Let Docker manage the storage of your database data by writing the database files to disk on the host system using its own internal volume management. This is the default and is easy and fairly transparent to the user. The downside is that the files may be hard to locate for tools and applications that run directly on the host system, i.e. outside containers. Create a data directory on the host system (outside the container) and mount this to a directory visible from inside the container. This places the database files in a known location on the host system, and makes it easy for tools and applications on the host system to access the files. The downside is that the user needs to make sure that the directory exists, and that e.g. directory permissions and other security mechanisms on the host system are set up correctly.
  4. Feb 2023
    1. On Ahrens' shipping container analogy to the zettelkasten

      @ZettelDistraction said Perhaps the shipping hub is a better analogy for the Zettelkasten than the shipping container (Ahrens, 40).

      We should be careful to separate the ideas of analogy and metaphor. Analogies are usually more direct and well-defined in scope.

      While there's an apt and direct correlation between shipping containers and zettelkasten as boxes, Ahrens was making the analogy with respect to the shift that shipping containers made to the overall system:

      shipping containers : shipping industry and globalism :: zettelkasten : thinking and writing/content creation

      As with many analogies, stretching it the way one might stretch metaphors isn't usually fruitful or even possible.

      In hindsight, we know why they failed: The ship owners tried to integrate the container into their usual way of working without changing the infrastructure and their routines. They tried to benefit from the obvious simplicity of loading containers onto ships without letting go of what they were used to.

      He's saying one needs to consider how one's note taking method fits into their work in a more integrative way. Without properly integrating it into one's workflow seamlessly the system will fail. This is also one of the most difficult problems many zettelkasten aspirants have. In addition to creating a zettelkasten, they're often also simultaneously trying to integrate new (digital) tools into their process at the same time and they get distracted by them rather than focusing on the move to increasing writing/creating and creativity overall (globalism).

      To focus on Ahrens' analogy a bit, if Obsidian, for example, is your "ship", is it as custom built for your specific purpose the way a container ship would be for a cargo container? Might you be better off with something like The Archive, ZKN3, or simple index cards that help to limit you to only do the function you want rather than all the other possible functions (wiki, blog, to do list, calendar, journal, kanban, etc.)? Obsidian and many other applications can be a proverbial row boat, a yacht, a tugboat, a steamer, a cruise ship, and even a warship in addition to a container ship, so one has to be extra careful how they choose to use it.

    2. Perhaps the shipping hub is a better analogy for the Zettelkasten than the shipping container (Ahrens, 40).

      Misreading of Ahrens. The shipping container wasn't a direct analogy to the zk. It was an analogy about process of building a system from the ground up to better effectuate a result.

  5. Dec 2022
    1. A container packages code and all its dependencies into a single unit, thus letting an application run quickly and reliably from one computing environment to another
    1. Container Image: These are packages of software required by containers that contain the code, runtime, system libraries, and dependencies. Usually they start from an image of an OS like Ubuntu. These images can be built manually, or can be retrieved from an image registry.
    1. A hypervisor is a type of software or hardware used to create virtual machines and then run those virtual machines day to day
  6. Nov 2022
    1. Orchestration involves provisioning, configuration, scheduling, scaling, monitoring, deployment, and more. Kubernetes is an example of a popular container orchestration solution.
    1. A "bare metal" virtual machine monitor, correctly called a "hypervisor," directly controls the hardware without using device drivers from another operating system
  7. Oct 2022
    1. As is common in the tradition of the zettelkasten, Goutor advises "that each note-card should contain only one item of information, whether a quotation, a summary, or anything else". (p28) He ascribes this requirement to his earlier need for clarity. (cross reference: https://hypothes.is/a/SfWFwENIEe2KfGMbR5n7Qg)

      He indicates that while it may seem wasteful to have only one item on each card that the savings in time, efficiency in handling, classification, and retrieval will more than compensate for the small waste.

      This sort of small local waste being compensated for by a larger global savings and efficiency can be seen in the design of the shipping container industry as discussed in Mark Levinson's The Box (Princeton University Press, 2008). Was this the exact sort of efficiency mentioned by Ahrens'? (Compare at https://hypothes.is/a/t4i32IXoEeyF2n9jQxu6BA)

  8. Feb 2022
    1. Unfortunately, the most common way people organise their writingis by making plans. Although planning is almost universallyrecommended by study guides, it’s the equivalent of putting oneselfon rails.Don’t make plans. Become an expert.

      Planning and especially overplanning your writing work can be counter-intuitively non-productive. A smarter reading and note taking approach can allow one to be playful and creative in a way that more focused, goal-oriented writing would never allow. It's also an incredibly valuable tool for when one becomes "stuck" and working on something else seems easier or more profitable.

      An example of this is the Ahren's extended use of the shipping container metaphor with respect to the zettelkasten. By having a variety of ideas stewing in his zettelkasten, a simple search or link using the word box allowed him to create a fantastic metaphor for reshaping one's note taking practice. It's a bit sad that he didn't take a moment to point this out explicitly (though perhaps this isn't the way things came about?)

    2. Only after aligning every single part of the delivery chain, frompackaging to delivery, from the design of the ships to the design ofthe harbours, was the full potential of the container unleashed.

      Streamlining one's entire workflow from start to finish can unleash tremendous amounts of additional system-wide productivity. Starting out by tinkering with small things here and there is more likely to doom these smaller individual changes to failure with out associated global changes.

      Once the overall system has been redesigned and reconfigured, then one can make and perfect smaller scale local changes.


      Link this to the idea of kelp and sailing/rowing from The West Wing.

    1. I learned from using those Macs early on that form is always malleable. This became even more apparent when the web came into the picture. Think about it: there’s no way to make a web page or a blog that is not an act of playing with its form at the same time as you're creating its content. So it just seemed natural: the world was always telling me that you worked on those two things – the container and its contents – together.

      There is a generation of people who grew up at the edge of the creation of computers and the web where they were simultaneously designing both the container and its contents at the same time. People before and after this typically worked on one or the other and most often on the contents themselves without access to the containers.

    2. I describe myself as a ‘media inventor’, which I know sounds like a strange label. To me, it means that a lot of my work – not really my novels, but almost everything else – involves inventing a format or container at the same time that I’m writing or imagining what goes into it.

      Robin Sloan considers himself a "media inventor" by which he means someone who creates containers and things which go into them.

  9. Jan 2022
  10. Sep 2021
    1. Simply put: alias docker=podman.
    2. What is Podman? Podman is a daemonless container engine for developing, managing, and running OCI Containers on your Linux System.
  11. Feb 2021
    1. From an administrator's point of view: you can use containers. The typical solution nowadays is to create a container per service, especially when different versions are needed. That somewhat solves the problem, but at a different level and with other drawbacks. For example, needing orchestration tools, setting up a shared cache of packages, and new machines to monitor rather than simple services.

      This is a very good pointer; I guess it refers to systemd services when it mentions "simple services".

  12. Jan 2021
  13. Nov 2020
  14. Oct 2020
  15. Sep 2020
    1. To me, abandoning all these live upgrades to have only k8s is like someone is asking me to just get rid of all error and exceptions handling and reboot the computer each time a small thing goes wrong.

      the Function-as-a-Service offering often have multiple fine-grained updateable code modules (functions) running within the same vm, which comes pretty close to the Erlang model.

      then add service mesh, which in some cases can do automatic retry at the network layer, and you start to recoup some of the supervisor tree advantages a little more.

      really fun article though, talking about the digital matter that is code & how we handle it. great reminder that there's much to explore. and some really great works we could be looking to.

  16. Jul 2020
  17. May 2020
  18. Jan 2020
  19. Mar 2019
    1. Pipeline de CI/CD no Kubernetes usando Jenkins e Spinnaker

      Uau! Muitos assuntos da prova LPI DevOps são explorados nessa palestra. Fica de olho no tópico: 702 Container Management.

  20. Jan 2019
  21. Oct 2018
  22. Sep 2018
  23. Jul 2018
  24. Sep 2017
    1. Singularity containers can be used to package entire scientific workflows, software and libraries, and even data.

      Very interesting, basically Singularity allows containers to run in HPC environments, so that code running in the container can take advantage of the HPC tools, like massive scale and message passing, while at the same time keeping the stuff in the container safer.

  25. Apr 2016
  26. Jan 2014
    1. Difference between XZ and LZMA2 Short answer: xz is a format that (currently) only uses the lzma2 compression algorithm. Long answer: think of xz as a container for the compression data generated by the lzma2 algorithm. We also have this paradigm for video files for example: avi/mkv/mov/mp4/ogv are containers, and xvid/x264/theora are compression algorithms. The confusion is often made because currently, the xz format only supports the lzma2 algorithm (and it’ll remain the default, even if some day, others algorithms may be added). This confusion doesn’t happen with other formats/algorithms, as for example gzip is both a compression algorithm and a format. To be exact, the gzip format only supports to encapsulate data generated by gzip… the compression algorithm. In this article I’ll use “xz” to say “the lzma2 algorithm whose data is being encapsulated by the xz format”. You’ll probably agree it’s way simpler

      The key here is the notion of a format as a container. Lots of content is moving towards that notion-- that a "file" is really an opaque (to the OS filesystem) directory or container of some sort and some other program understands the format of the "file" as a container to know how to open it to access the files inside.