7 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2019
    1. allowing common connections to be made wirelessly

      This sounds a bit like “send” and “receive” in some (visual) programming languages and modular synths. But the fact that it’s based on common connections sounds quite clever.

    2. Your hardware modular rig is completely integrated,

      Only started playing with Bitwig’s HW/CV integration a few days ago but it’s easy to get inspired by this.

    3. Grid devices can be nested or layered along with other devices and your plug-ins,

      Thanks to training for Cycling ’74 Max, had a kind of micro-epiphany about encapsulation, a year or so ago. Nesting devices in one another sounds like a convenience but there’s a rather deep effect on workflow when you start arranging things in this way: you don’t have to worry about the internals of a box/patcher/module/device if you really know what you can expect out of it. Though some may take this for granted (after all, other modular systems have had it for quite a while), there’s something profound about getting modules that can include other modules. Especially when some of these are third-party plugins.

    4. Try something crazy

      DAWs typically don’t mesh so well with prototyping culture. When Ableton brought clip launching through Live, its flagship DAW, it had some of this effect: experiment with clips then play with them instead of just playing them. Of course, Cycling ’74 has been all about prototyping, long before Ableton bought the company. But “Max for Live” devices are closer to plugins in that users expect to just be able to use them, not have to create them from scratch. What this marketing copy is emphasizing is that this really is about getting a box of LEGO blocks, not just about getting a DIY kit to create your own instance of something which somebody else designed. The framing sure is specific.

  2. Jun 2018
    1. Modularity enables a mass of experiments to proceed in parallel, with different teams working on the same modules, each proposing different solutions. Modularity allows different "blocks" to be easily assembled, facilitating decentralised innovation that all fits together.
  3. Nov 2017
    1. When you think the problem to be solved is the high cost of textbooks, inclusive access programs and OER adoption are just two competing approaches to solving the problem.

      There was an interesting example of this during a short conference on digital textbooks, back in late 2014. Cindy Ives interim VP Academic at Athabasca (!) presented the etext pilot project in partnership with publishers. Ives’s approach was quite pragmatic and there’s nothing wrong with doing a pilot project on something like this. By that time, Ives was already involved in OER projects. It still struck a chord with those of us who care about OER, including Éric Francoeur who took an active part in the event and did work to create a free textbook through international and interlinguistic collaboration.

      To me, a key notion from the ‘r’ in “OER” is the distinction with those content bundles we still call “textbooks”. Sure, it’s already in the 5-R model. But the “Remix” idea in music is to a large extent about unbundling.

  4. Jul 2015