16 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. For they who are born deaf, can make themselves understood by visible signs; and we have it on the best authority, that the Mimes of the Ancients, were perfectly intelli-gible, without the use of words.

      Sheridan looks for a definition of language that holds weight across multiple types of humans and cultural techniques (people who are deaf, mimes, the literate). Is he then perhaps exploring the question "which languages?" instead of "what is language?"

    1. they need only peruse what they've Writ, and consider whether they wou'd express 'cmsclvcs thus in Conversation

      And what of those who cannot see/sense writing in the same way they sense speech? What cut is she making here in ability?

    1. master a multiple, diversified, almost boundless domain of culture.

      Another apparatus (printing) which greatly opens up our understanding of the world and our access to others, allowing us to ask the question "which one?"

    1. affect the mind of a peasant or Indian with lhe highest admiration

      Another set of cuts here (and with the "person, familiarized to superior beauties").

      Those who have limited exposure to observe or practice (and thereby to increase refinement of taste) are in another category altogether.

      Who is cut off by the inability to increase taste and whose voices are silenced?

    2. sound and a defective state

      And who/what determines those states? Where are the cuts made between the two?

    1. an imperfection rather upon our words than understandings

      Hm, okay. So what I took (above) as comments on humanity, Locke is saying are comments on language. (Or is it both?)

    2. ideas, which are also universally the same

      I already have a problem.

      Is sensation a universal phenomenon? If so, that doesn't mean that human's experience sensations in the same way and therefore the ideas generated from those sensations would naturally vary.

      The desire for "universal" anything seems fraught with problem, even for seemingly "simple" ideas.

    3. incomplete or inaccurate idea

      Incomplete or inaccurate according to whom? Some objective Truth?

    1. 011 1/w Ed11catio11 of Girls (published in 1687),

      Cf. Wollstonecraft's Vindication of the Rights of Woman, written about 100 years later, making a similar argument. Specifically, Wollstonecraft argues that women are not naturally inferior or frivolous but have been bred that way through poor education. Taken in comparison to the Enlightenment's exploration of human nature and with a lack of significant progress between 1687 and 1792 (outside of literacy, noted below), it seems clear that "human nature" really means "man's nature."

    2. fundamental

      Which "fundaments"? What foundations are the ones that "all people" start with?

    3. he study of "man," as Pope and his classical forebear Horace put it, to be the proper activity of the poet.

      Cf. Le Guin's hero-killer story

      What other stories were lost under this focus?

    4. We all value one another M> much

      And who, precisely, does he count as "one another"?

  2. Jan 2019
    1. nature—as opposed to cul-ture—is ahistorical and timeless?

      Doreen Massey has an interesting book that touches on this (Space, Place, and Gender), where she points out that time and space are treated as binaries, where time is typically masculine and dynamic and space is feminine and static. Nature (gendered feminine) is spatial, a place, and therefore not a time ("ahistorical and timeless"). Culture, on the other hand, is temporal, dynamic, masculine. It's a very particular rhetoric which begs the "which one?" question.

      (While Massey points out this common way of conceiving of time/space and binaries in general [A vs. Not A], she argues that the concept of space needs to be defined on its own merit, distinct from its binary opposite.)

    2. as if Nature isa container.

      Why does Kirby reject the notion of Nature as container? Is she posing containers as inert objects, 'mere' holders? Cf. Le Guin's notion of the container as another type of story.

  3. Mar 2015
    1. an objective set for the Sprint that can be met through the implementation of Product Backlog. It provides guidance to the Development Team on why it is building the Increment. It is created during the Sprint Planning meeting. The Sprint Goal gives the Development Team some flexibility regarding the functionality implemented within the Sprint. The selected Product Backlog items deliver one coherent function, which can be the Sprint Goal. The Sprint Goal can be any other coherence that causes the Development Team to work together rather than on separate initiatives.

      an objective set for the Sprint that can be met through the implementation of Product Backlog. It provides guidance to the Development Team on why it is building the Increment. It is created during the Sprint Planning meeting. The Sprint Goal gives the Development Team some flexibility regarding the functionality implemented within the Sprint. The selected Product Backlog items deliver one coherent function, which can be the Sprint Goal. The Sprint Goal can be any other coherence that causes the Development Team to work together rather than on separate initiatives.