122 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jun 2021
  3. May 2021
    1. “You can’t use HTML5 or CSS3 in email.” Due to their “limited” support, the idea that using HTML5 and CSS3 in email is “impossible” remains a commonly-held notion throughout the email design industry. However, we’re calling it a complete myth.
    1. Just because there can be issues with CSS in HTML emails doesn’t mean you should abandon efforts to use it. It all comes down to determining which codes are absolutely needed and how to style them so they can be rendered by email platforms.
  4. Apr 2021
    1. (Yes, I realize from a technical, end-user perspective this really doesn't matter.)

      The word "technical" in this sentence doesn't seem to belong or to clarify anything. I think it would be clearer without it.

      But I think I understand what he's saying, which is that technical details don't matter to the end user. They only know/see/care if it works or not.

    1. Although echo "$@" prints the arguments with spaces in between, that's due to echo: it prints its arguments with spaces as separators.

      due to echo adding the spaces, not due to the spaces already being present

      Tag: not so much:

      whose responsibility is it? but more: what handles this / where does it come from? (how exactly should I word it?)

    1. unsuspecting childlikeness

      I'd also add [learned helplessness] (https://www.britannica.com/science/learned-helplessness) - the constant need for entertainment is definitely a problem, but if we take a deterministic view of these broader design trends the long-term ramifications are even more disturbing - the rise of Web 2.0 has seen a massive shift towards user-friendly platforms, but in addition to cultural infantilization we are seeing a significant decrease in tech literacy - and sometimes these trends manifest simultaneously. For instance, I'm writing this annotation in Chrome, but if I lose internet access my browser tab would allow me to play the endlessly addictive "Chrome Dino" browser game until my connection was restored - this is a fairly innocuous little easter egg (not coincidentally a term also used by Yelp UI designer Yoni De Beule in one of the articles I linked to above), but it does raise some broader questions about the amount of tech literacy and user autonomy these companies want us to have - features like these suggest that passivity is their preferred state for consumers, which is troubling.

    1. # +devise_for+ is meant to play nicely with other routes methods. For example, # by calling +devise_for+ inside a namespace, it automatically nests your devise # controllers: # # namespace :publisher do # devise_for :account # end
  5. Mar 2021
    1. Following on the IndieWeb's "just" conversation, this illustration is a good example of the idea, though step 5 doesn't include the words "just" or "simply". It can reflect the problems of leaving these words out without providing the additional context they're papering over.

    1. The beauty of hypertext is that we’re able to quickly add much-needed context helpful for n00bs but easy enough for those already in-the-know to scan over. And making documentation more human-readable benefits everyone.

      It would be cool to make developers and writers document all the missing information in their documents every time they use the word "[[just]]".

    1. Svelte is there when I need it with useful APIs, but fades into the background as I put my app together.
    2. One part of React that I've always championed is how it's just JavaScript. I like that in React you don't use a distinct template syntax and instead embed JavaScript, compared to Svelte's templating language
    3. I will always find React's approach easier - at least in my head - and I think more friendly to people familiar with JavaScript who are learning a library.
    1. Another important MicroJS attribute is independence. Ember, Backbone—even Bootstrap to a degree–have hard dependencies on other libraries. For example, all three rely on jQuery. A good MicroJS library stands by itself with no dependencies. There are exceptions to the rule, but in general, any dependency is another small MicrojJS library.
    1. Last week, I shared how to check if an input is empty with CSS. Today, let’s talk about the same thing, but with JavaScript.
    1. You can do and impressive amount of form validation with just HTML attributes. You can make the user experience pretty clean and clear with CSS selectors.
    1. the client form validation is the one I like a lot, because, for example, by adding required attribute to an input, I don’t need to write any additional JavaScript to warn a user, when the user submits a form without filling out the required fields
    1. There’s no additional logic from Trailblazer happening here. The function returns a well-defined hash which is passed as an argument to step.
  6. Feb 2021
    1. Keyword arguments allow to define particular parameters as required. Should the parameter be missing, they also provide a way to set a default value. This is all done with pure Ruby.
    1. This is failing CI because CI is testing against Rails < 6. I think the appropriate next steps are: Open a separate PR to add Rails 6 to the CI matrix Update this PR to only run CSP-related test code for Rails >= 6.0.0 Can you help with either or both of those?
    1. which entails computer programming (process of writing and maintaining the source code), but also encompasses a planned and structured process from the conception of the desired software to its final manifestation
    1. Operations define the flow of their logic using the DSL and implement the particular steps with pure Ruby.
    1. And honestly, most people prefer the no hassle, especially after wasting too much time dabbling with distros that are "for advanced users" troubleshooting all kinds of dumbass problems that just worked out of the box in many other distros.
    1. I chose 18.04 because it's the latest LTS version, and I'm not keen on updating my OS every year or so. (I like getting things stable and not having to worry for a while)
  7. Jan 2021
    1. Its not too complicated but it is an annoyance. I want /etc/hosts, /etc/resolv.conf, /etc/nsswitch.conf, /etc/rc.local and all the standard stuff to work. The heavy lifting is done in the kernel. All they need to do is leave it alone. Its getting harder to make Ubuntu behave like Linux.
    1. Most users frankly don’t care how software is packaged. They don’t understand the difference between deb / rpm / flatpak / snap. They just want a button that installs Spotify so they can listen to their music.
    2. What’s the use of ie. snap libreoffice if it can’t access documents on a samba server in my workplace ? Should I really re-organize years of storage and work in my office for being able to use snap ? A too high price to pay, for the moment.
    3. I - we all - totally agree about the benefits of snap for developers. But the loss of comfort and flexibility for end user is eventually a no-go option.
    4. Only folks who help package Chromium get to decide how Chromium gets packaged. This gives anyone two options: You can get involved and help package Chromium so you have a voice in the decision-making, or not.
    5. Users want work be done. Not struggling about how allowing access to removable medias or such a file on another partition… Not breaking their habits or workflows each time a snap replaces a deb.
  8. Dec 2020
    1. My frustration is mainly from Svelte's choices that are very un-JavaScript-like. It doesn't have to be "like React/Vue". React is React because it doesn't restrict what you can do with JavaScript for the most part. It's just common FP practice to fold/map.
  9. Nov 2020
    1. It's really helpful that Svelte stores are easy to use in plain JS. We can change a state store over completely to Svelte and make the Angular components subscribe to that store as well without needing to maintain and sync 2 copies of the state.
    1. This is Sass based, and therefore doesn't require Svelte components

      Just because we could make Svelte wrapper components for each Material typography [thing], doesn't mean we should.

      Compare:

      • material-ui [react] did make wrapper components for typography.

        • But why did they? Is there a technical reason why they couldn't just do what svelte-material-ui did (as in, something technical that Svelte empowers/allows?), or did they just not consider it?
      • svelte-material-ui did not.

        • And they were probably wise to not do so. Just reuse the existing work from the Material team so that there's less work for you to keep in sync and less chance of divergence.
    1. Mostly it is pure JS once it gets inside the browser, so you can debug effectively which is not the case with Vue for example.
    1. If the goal of this is purely to avoid showing a runtime warning (and isn't needed for other functionality) I think we should try to consider other ways of dealing with the root issue. See also #4652, which has been opened for just this concern.
  10. Oct 2020
    1. There are other features you *could* actually polyfill, such as Array.of, Number.isNaN or Object.assign, because those don’t introduce syntax changes to the language – except that you shouldn’t.
    1. All validators can be used independently. Inspried by functional programming paradigm, all built in validators are just functions.

      I'm glad you can use it independently like:

      FormValidation.validators.creditCard().validate({
      

      because sometimes you don't have a formElement available like in their "main" (?) API examples:

      FormValidation.formValidation(formElement
      
    1. If the react cargo cult didn't have the JSX cowpath paved for them and acclimated to describing their app interface with vanilla javascript, they'd cargo cult around that. It's really about the path of least resistance and familiarity.
    2. hyperscript is much simpler to refactor and DRY up your code than with JSX, because, being vanilla javascript, its easier to work with variable assignment, loops and conditionals.
    1. This is valid javascript! Or harmony or es6 or whatever, but importantly, it's not happening outside the js environment. This also allows us to use our standard tooling: the traceur compiler knows how to turn jsx`<div>Hello</div>`; into the equivalent browser compatible es3, and hence we can use anything the traceur compile accepts!
    1. So while Solid's JSX and might resemble React it by no means works like React and there should be no illusions that a JSX library will just work with Solid. Afterall, there are no JSX libraries, as they all work without JSX, only HyperScript or React ones.
  11. Sep 2020
    1. Functions have lots of interesting and useful properties. You can isolate them. You can compose them. You can memoize them. In other words, functional UI feels correct, and powerful, in a way that wasn’t true of whatever came before it. I think this is why people get quasi-religious about React. It’s not that it’s Just JavaScript. It’s that it’s Just Functions. It’s profound.

    1. If you can't understand where it's coming from in the stack traces, please post screenshots or create reproducing sandboxes and we'll try to help. Most of these are probably coming from a few libraries, so the most productive thing to do is to reduce these cases and then file issues with those libraries.
  12. Jul 2020
  13. May 2020
    1. CodeGuard relies upon industry best practices to protect customers’ data. All backups and passwords are encrypted, secure connections (SFTP/SSH/SSL) are utilized if possible, and annual vulnerability testing is conducted by an independent agency. To-date, there has not been a data breach or successful hack or attack upon CodeGuard.
  14. Apr 2020
    1. Despite their awarded diplomas in the art of writing, you'd be surprised at how many editors and journalists in the United States make English mistakes. For instance, "an" is still often coupled with words that begin with an "H" sound, even though this is improper. I'd advise against treating material from news sources as if it were error-free or even a higher authority on grammar.
    1. Surely all Uber drivers were submitted to the same labor regime, but those who had to endure it as a means to survive were predominantly people of color.

      This is also true of companies like Instacart, GrubHub,etc.

  15. Jan 2020
  16. Dec 2019
  17. Nov 2019
  18. Aug 2019
    1. Note - this is only the about me section. Going to have some basic information about the organization, but clearly you'll have to dig through to get more.

    2. resources for Oregonians working to improve our shared environment.

      what other kinds of resources besides stories? Clarity if possible.

  19. Jul 2019
    1. She didn’t know how to approach her children to address it. She talked about standing there, excluded, while her children laughed along with the video.

      This observation by the mother reminded me that we are often fearful of 'new things' that lead us to behave differently even with people we know. This Mom can connect with her children in her usual way because she knows them, and approach them based on what she knows about them, not the technology. She can ask them to teach her about what they know!

  20. Mar 2019
    1. is your company embracing just in time learning This article, by shift learning (a credible if not foremost publisher) lists benefits of just in time learning. Among those are the ability to provide up to date and easily accessed information. They argue that it creates more engaged employees but do not provide data to support this argument. rating 3/5

    1. just in time teaching This article provides practice strategies by which one can use just in time teaching. This was authored for use in higher education environments but can easily be used in other settings. It appears to have practical use. rating 5/5

    1. what is just in time learning: build an engagement engine This article helps professional developers strategize about the use of just in time learning. Some of the tips are unsurprising while others offer new ideas. It is a quick read and useful for ideas for professional developers. rating 5/5

    1. 10 awesome ways to use mobile learning for employee training This is an article about strategies and applications of mobile learning for employee development. A number of ideas are presented. I lack the knowledge base to evaluate the soundness, novelty, etc. of these ideas. There are screen shots and they are interesting enough but give only a limited idea of the concept being discussed. rating 3/5

    1. Using Just in Time Training for Active Learning in The Workplace

      This does not necessarily seem to be of top quality but it is the only item I have found so far that addresses just in time training specifically within healthcare. It does not do so in great depth. It does briefly address technology and mobile learning but not in a way that is tremendously insightful. rating 2/2

    1. Time Training (and the Best Practices

      What is just in time training This is an introductory and brief article that relates to just in time training. It describes the conditions needed to bring about adoption of this process. I am not in a position to evaluate the content but the ideas seem useful. rating 4/5

    1. This article explains just in time learning (such as that which can be done via devices) within the context of higher education. My interest is in public health education, but at this moment, I am not sure how much I can narrow in on that topic, so I will save this for now. This is obviously not a scholarly article but is of some interest nonetheless. rating 2/5

    1. This plain page incorporates an overview of job aids by Allison Rossett, who is the foremost authority on the topic. Not all information is given away for free as she wants to sell her books, which are also promoted on the page. This page can be a good way of tracking her current work. Rating 3/5

  21. Feb 2019
  22. Jan 2019
    1. here are representations on the one hand and ontologicallyseparate entities awaiting representation on the other

      Ok, I think this is it. This is her whole thing; her thesis. And it is one hell of a thesis.

    2. healthy skepticismtoward Cartesian doubt

      lol, but for real, what Barad is suggesting really is difficult to do, or at least I'm finding it difficult to do.

      We believe words are more understandable and apprehensible than the physical world. We believe words are more understandable and apprehensible than the physical world. We believe words are more understandable and apprehensible than the physical world. . .

      It seems crazy because our society is so science and tech driven, but she's right. We believe words to be prior (ontologically) to the world around us because they are a part of "us," our own minds.

      Distorting Descartes's famous thought experiment here seems to help me understand this. While I suspect the average person could be pushed into admitting the possibility of an evil demon spinning an elaborate hoax for you, deceiving your physical senses and tricking your brain, I can't imagine finding anyone who would admit the opposite. The opposite would be that the external world exists largely as you perceive it. The demon is not manipulating your experience of the natural world at all. Instead, he is tricking you into believing you exist.

      We're so Cartesian we can't even conceive of it being otherwise. Perhaps Spinoza would help here, as well as other monist ontologies?

      Someone please redeem this annotation I don't even know what is happening anymore.

    3. “appearance” makes its first appearanc

      "What is" instead of "which one?"

  23. Oct 2017
    1. As information literacy instruction is also a form of storytelling, animated GIFs might be a good format for library tutorials. Suhr’s reasons included: A group of pictures gives immediate feedback as to how much information is being conveyed. A screencast, on the other hand, doesn’t give much of a clue as to what the user is committing to. Pictures have natural break points between steps. A series of images enhances closure, which is the phenomenon of observing the parts but perceiving the whole. Comics artists employ closure by carefully sequencing panels and knowing what to keep “off-screen.” A series of animated GIFs combines closure with the dynamic element of video.

      GIFs (and their resurgence) are an interesting hybrid approach falling somewhere between videos and images. One can see how modelling videos after animated GIFs could be a good way to provide quick, just-in-time information.

  24. Apr 2017
  25. Feb 2017
  26. Aug 2016
    1. VISITS

      I'm not sure exactly where this would fit in, but some way to reporting total service hours (per week or other time period) would be useful, esp as we start gauging traffic, volume, usage against number of service hours. In our reporting for the Univ of California, we have to report on services hours for all public service points.

      Likewise, it may be helpful to have a standard way to report staffing levels re: coverage of public service points? or in department? or who work on public services?

  27. Apr 2016
  28. Oct 2015
  29. Oct 2013
    1. the better sort of man will be just without being forced to be so, and the written laws depend on force while the unwritten ones do not

      Can a person, like in the above scenario, actually be forced to be just? Who determines what's equal, what's fair when it's not a black-and-white situation ("failing to do them good")?

  30. Sep 2013
    1. SOCRATES: And in the same way, he who has learned what is just is just?

      Being just... isn't a profession. Logically flawed.

    2. Socrates defines good and evil: just and unjust.