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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jun 2020
  3. May 2020
    1. Döhla, M., Boesecke, C., Schulte, B., Diegmann, C., Sib, E., Richter, E., Eschbach-Bludau, M., Aldabbagh, S., Marx, B., Eis-Hübinger, A.-M., Schmithausen, R. M., & Streeck, H. (2020). Rapid point-of-care testing for SARS-CoV-2 in a community screening setting shows low sensitivity. Public Health. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2020.04.009

    1. highlights, ideas, annotations, comments, and feedback will enhance The Latticework

      Current community forums are terrible. They happen out of context and are ugly and ineffective. As Edward Tufte beautifully demonstrates, that type of context switching impairs learning. So, we’ve built our social and collaborative tools so that they are embedded into the resource – enhancing learning and retention. (https://blas.com/on-edward-tufte/)

    1. The folks at Netlify created Netlify CMS to fill a gap in the static site generation pipeline. There were some great proprietary headless CMS options, but no real contenders that were open source and extensible—that could turn into a community-built ecosystem like WordPress or Drupal. For that reason, Netlify CMS is made to be community-driven, and has never been locked to the Netlify platform (despite the name).

      Kind of an unfortunate name...

  4. Apr 2020
  5. community.snowsoftware.com community.snowsoftware.com
    1. a more intuitive modern community that will be better synced with our Knowledge Base and other support materials
  6. Mar 2020
    1. Around 5 or 6 p.m., a trivia emcee will pose one question to the group, and employees submit guesses in a Slack thread until someone responds with the correct answer. The emcee continues this way for four more questions, and the competition can get fierce.
    1. one multispecies competition experiment and two pairwise competition experiments

      Do the multispecies experiments run parallel to the pairwise experiments?

      Is it possible that presence of other species affect the growth rates and R* values of the two species in the pairwise study by unknown interactions (symbiosis?) with other species in the mixed community? .

    1. if you'd like to chat in a private/encrypted Signal Group Chat with other subscribers, just let me know.
  7. Feb 2020
    1. This week, host Bob Garfield did a piece ostensibly about the problems newspaper sites have with website comments. Unfortunately it just came out sounding like another old journalist kvetching about how everyone on the net is an idiot. You can listen to the story here.

      Here's the new link to the audio: https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/otm/episodes/131068-july-25-2008

      Here's the link to a version of the site in August 2008 with the commentary, which makes a fascinating rabbit hole to go down: https://web.archive.org/web/20080907233914/http://www.onthemedia.org/episodes/2008/07/25/segments/104537

    1. Why can't there be more sites with solid commentary like this anymore? Do the existence of Twitter and Facebook mean whe can't have nice things anymore?

    2. The comments on this piece are interesting and illuminating, particularly all these years later.

    1. I just wrote a long, considered, friendly, and I hope helpful comment here but -- sorry, I have to see the irony in this once again -- your system wouldn't let me say anything longer tahn 1,500 characters. If you want more intelligent conversations, you might want to expand past soundbite.

      In 2008, even before Twitter had become a thing at 180 characters, here's a great reason that people should be posting their commentary on their own blogs.

      This example from 2008 is particularly rich as you'll find examples on this page of Derek Powazek and Jeff Jarvis posting comments with links to much richer content and commentary on their own websites.

      We're a decade+ on and we still haven't managed to improve on this problem. In fact, we may have actually made it worse.

      I'd love to see On the Media revisit this idea. (Of course their site doesn't have comments at all anymore either.)

    1. With k6, our goal has always been to create the best load testing tool for the modern working developer and that we do this in collaboration with the k6 community. Our revenue will not come from k6 directly, but from premium value creating offers based on k6. These offers will be made available at https://loadimpact.com. Load Impact premium offers will have focus on providing further simplicity, productivity and ease to use functionality.
    2. We believe the key to Load Impact’s long-term success as a Company is to foster an active community of users around k6 as an open source project. To achieve this long-term goal, it is vital that we do not withhold new features from k6 based on whether or not they compete with our SaaS offering.
  8. Jan 2020
    1. Lightning Platform allows you to build employee-facing apps to customize and extend your Salesforce CRM. With Heroku you can go even further, building pixel-perfect applications for your customers in open-source languages like Java, Ruby, Python, PHP, JavaScript, and Go.

      Lightning: internal apps, employee-facing<br> Heroku: non-internal open-source apps, taking advantage of organization infrastructure and data

      Of course, if not all employees are Salesforce users/licensed, then a "non-internal" app could still be an organizational app, but without having to secure expensive Salesforce licenses. Also, if one wanted to build an external "customer" engagement community it could be done without needing a Salesforce Community and associated community licenses.

  9. Dec 2019
    1. Do the technical administrators have to be the same people doing the social organizing? I think the answer as of June 2019 is, sadly, yes. If you have 2 people with root access to the server and 2 people managing the community aspects, you'll end up with imbalances in that group of 4. You will end up with technical administrators who feel like code monkeys who never get the gratitude that the community organizers get, or you'll end up with community organizers who feel like glorified babysitters while the techies have all the real power. You might even end up with a situation where both are true. I think that if you're dedicated to this sort of project though, you could start with something like that 2 and 2, and then the techies could teach the organizers the technical skills, and the organizers could teach the techies the organizing skills.
    2. Social solutions to social problems This document exists to lay out some general principles of running a small social network site that have worked for me. These principles are related to community building more than they are related to specific technologies. This is because the big problems with social network sites are not technical: the problems are social problems related to things like policy, values, and power.

      Social solutions to social problems

  10. Nov 2019
    1. Sassoon’s lament for the dehumanizing and destructive effects of technolatry represents “a true prophetic cry”:

      Does not Taylor in Secular Age speak to the same issue with the Christian's abandonment of the supernatural?

      Smith, J. K. A. (2014). How (not) to be secular: Reading Charles Taylor. Retrieved from https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=7AYaAwAAQBAJ

      Taylor, C. (2018). A secular age. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press.

    1. The authors detail their development of a professional learning community to advance technology integration at Nova Southeastern University. After a literature review of the key components of online learning, they discuss the method of implementing the PLC and the major outcomes and then offer recommendations for starting a PLC within institutions of higher ed.

      10/10

  11. Oct 2019
    1. Executive Summary: 7-Eleven is known in the United States as a convenience store chain where customers can grab snacks, drinks and other everyday products on the go. In most parts of the world, it is a no-frills store with little emphasis on decor. But in Indonesia,7-Eleven has been positioned as a trendy spot where young people spend time, surf the Internet and meet friends. This case study of 7-Eleven illustrates how a brand needs to and can benefit from adapting to a local market.It's one of the hippest places to hang out in Jakarta. And it isn't some trendy new French restaurant in a Dutch-era heritage building. Instead, thousands of people in the Indonesian capital spend their evenings sipping coffee or beer on pavement tables at their neighbourhood 7-Eleven, the international convenience store synonymous with anytime, on-the-go shopping in most parts of the world.Indonesia's 7-Elevens are, clearly, a long way from the original concept behind the world's largest convenience store chain. "At 7-Eleven, our purpose and mission is to make life a little easier for our guests by being where they need us, whenever they need us," says the company's website. And that's what it has been doing all over the world since the first convenience store was born after a Southland Ice Co employee in Dallas started selling milk, eggs and bread from an ice dock in 1927.The 7-Eleven chain has about 49,500 stores in 16 countries across the world, over 10,000 of them in North AmericaToday, the chain has grown to about 49,500 stores in 16 countries, more than 10,000 in North America itself, but its core customer remains the same: people on the go who need a one-stop shop to quickly buy everyday products. Typically, most 7-Eleven stores all over the world are conveniently located in office areas and are open around the clock.Initially, 7-Eleven spread its wings slowly. In its early years, it grew strategically in suburbs in the United States and areas too small for a supermarket: by 1963, it had 1,000 stores across the country. But it began to grow at breakneck pace after it adopted a franchisee model the following year. In 1969, 7-Eleven began expanding beyond US borders and set up shop in Canada. In the 1970s and early 1980s, it expanded to Mexico, Japan and Asian markets such as Taiwan, Singapore and the Philippines. With the increasing importance of emerging Asian markets such as Thailand, the Philippines and Malaysia, 7-Eleven Corporation moved its corporate headquarters to Japan in 2001.Traditionally, 7-Eleven's entry strategy is to target urban markets and tailor stores to local tastes. For example, customers in Hong Kong can pay their phone and utility bills at a local 7-Eleven; in Taiwan, they can service their bicycles or photocopy at the convenience store; and in the US they can pick-up their online Amazon shopping there. By offering these services - often exclusively - customer traffic can be increased significantly. To achieve this customer orientation and competitive advantage, almost all stores arfe operated by franchisees, who understand the local environment.7-Eleven in Indonesia has everything local markets offer, and more. It also has live entertainment and wireless connectivitySo, when 7-Eleven entered the Indonesian market in 2008, the question was: what was the Indonesian customer looking for and where should the retailer position itself? The Southeast Asian country was an ideal market for a retailer. It was among the world's largest growing economies with a population of 240 million and a growing class of consumers.But Indonesia had some typical traits not found in other markets. For one, just hanging out and doing nothing is so deeply embedded in Indonesian culture, the local language has a special word for it: nongkrong.People traditionally gather at street markets and share stories, eat in local markets and roadside food stalls called warungs or Western fastfood chains such as McDonalds, Dunking Donuts or coffee shops such as Starbucks which entered Southeast Asia a whi le ago.Moreover, Indonesia is highly plugged-in: the country had an estimated 20 to 30 million Internet users in 2009, a big chunk of them between the ages of 15 and 19. 7-Eleven studied the culture, habits and tastes of the Indonesian population and realised Indonesia lacked places where young people could hang out, eat, drink and follow their new passion: being online. It adopted a unique business model in the country: it blended a small supermarket with inexpensive readymade food and seating to cater to Jakarta customers looking for outdoor recreation space in a city where traffic jams often restrict mobility.7-Eleven in Indonesia included everything local markets and street vendors offered - and more. The store is open 24 hours, has hasslefree parking, offers leisure activities such as concerts, is air-conditioned and, most importantly, has wireless connectivity. Sixty-five per cent of the Indonesian franchise's customers are less than 30 years old and love social networking. 7-Eleven also featured local artists or live bands to further attract the nongkrong-ing crowds at its stores.
    1. #BuatBaikTogether 7-Eleven Malaysia initiated its third donation drive #BuatBaikTogether, which came into inception in 2017. The campaign is held during the year end in efforts to extend further support for the underprivileged community. Walk in-customers can donate necessities such as food, beverages, household essentials and other supplies purchased from 7-Eleven stores and place them into the collection box. Contributions will then be distributed to a list of selected beneficiaries. Furthermore, with every contribution of selected partner brands, 7-Eleven Malaysia will also donate 10 cents to a selected charity organization.