579 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jan 2022
  3. Dec 2021
    1. Web3 is best under­stood as a game, or a game of games. I don’t intend that as a dig: it’s a really good game! Vast and open-ended, deeply social, with lots of scores to tally … AND you can win real money?? I mean, that’s terrific.
    2. This message was emailed to the Media Lab committee. The assumed audience is subscribers who know roughly what Web3 is supposed to be, but aren’t sure what to think about it. (Here’s more about assumed audiences.)
    1. NFTs appeal to people interested in art, music, sports and culture
    2. People own bitcoin because of the story (digital gold that anyone can use and no one controls) and the scarcity (21M will be created by 2140 and the protocol verifies and enforces that scarcity).A story and scarcity has created a cryptocurrency that today has a market cap of $1.1T, which is greater than the currency of all but 13 countries in the worldTens of millions of people globally now own bitcoin and believe it has massive value despite countless claims that it’s worthless from conventional wisdom in the media and on Wall Street. The success of bitcoin is a testament to the authenticity of the creation (it was the first protocol to achieve trust-minimized digital scarcity) and the conviction of the community. The community did not care what the institutional narrative was, it just believed the story. More and more people have come to believe the story over time, which validates the belief of the early supporters and increases the value.
    3. We’re now seeing new stories attract new people to the cryptocurrency space who don’t care much about money and finance. It turns out there are more people in the world who primarily care about art, music, sports and culture. And stories about art, music, sports and culture tend to be more fun and relatable
    1. lit­tle plac­ards up top mak­ing it clear they are aimed at dif­fer­ent groups of read­ers. Those groups might overlap! They might also: not.
    2. the way they push back against the “context collapse” of the internet, in which every pub­lic post is, by default, addressed to everyone.
    1. “The magic lies in their ability to take word-of-mouth marketing and turn the launches of their products into sort of micro-experiential events,”
    2. “I would call it a brand that’s heavily integrated with art and culture that tends to drive demand through consumer desire and consumer passion as opposed to explicit marketing.”
    3. brand’s products are “emblematic of rebellious youth culture,”
    4. in-the-know
    5. marketing-shy skateboard shop with a cult following fits
    6. symbolize the ultimate in underground cool.
    7. throngs of fans and “hypebeasts” (the term for the streetwear-obsessed)
    8. streetwear aficionados
    1. Une communauté d’apprentissage numérique dans son collège Animation : René Bélanger et Suzanne Mercier (Cégep de Matane) La mise en place d’une communauté d’apprentissage numérique dans son collège amène la mobilisation d’un groupe d’enseignants à innover dans sa pratique ce qui insuffle un vent de changement pour tout le collège. Partage d’expertise, validation de pratique, formation, réflexion sur les enjeux du numérique…
    1. In this study, we drew on sociocultural notions of agency – where individual actions are entwined with community goals. A community is comprised of people with shared and individual goals, in their environments, in the midst of a historical context (Wenger 1998Wenger, E. 1998. Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press. [Crossref], [Google Scholar]). Due to this web of relationships with people, environment, and history, people do not act autonomously, but according to possibilities within the community. Such possibilities for agency are negotiated over time; actions that strengthen ties to the community constitute investments in the self that in turn, have outcomes for the community as well (Peirce 1995Peirce, B. N. 1995. “Social Identity, Investment, and Language Learning.” TESOL Quarterly 29: 9–31. doi:10.2307/3587803. [Crossref], [Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar]). The financial metaphor in using the word investment is critical – it connotes spent effort that yields dividends. These dividends emerge immediately and over time.

      This helps me consider communities of practice, and unpacking the relational aspects - agency within a context, not autonomous, informed by the context and others. Is there a tension with "groupthink", how to value the diversity in a group, and build stronger not weaker, not defaulting or regressing to a mean?. How do we build a group to be more than the sum of the parts. how does the community work to enhance practice.

  4. Nov 2021
    1. collaboration within a community of people: diverse perspectives, active engagement

      Similar ideas here: Stephen Downes (2015). Design Elements in a Personal Learning Environment. Invited talk, Guadalajara, Mexico. https://www.slideshare.net/Downes/design-elements-in-a-personal-learning-environment-52303224

      What makes an 'online course' different to an 'online learning community'?

    2. people reading the same book at the same time, exploring the same ideas…Norms around signalling you're interested in something, and the extent of your interest, would go far

      How do we find the connections we don't know we're looking for?

    1. However, I would say that the distributive and regenerative society that Raworth proposes would depend a lot on resilient and self-reliant local communities and local government acting as a ‘partner’ as is nowadays talked about a lot.These communities and government would need to figure out together how to let amongst others local agriculture, manufacturing and managing the Commons flourish. The book instead pretty much leaves out local communities in which the households are embedded and government focus is almost completely on nation states.

      Communities could be the key to a successful transition, as they are small enough to be agile in decision making, if done optimally, and large enough to be impactful.

    1. The recipe for starting a new media venture in 2021 seems to be straightforward: blog, newsletter, podcast. From there you scale up and start adding additional verticals, like events (both virtual and in-person as more people get vaccinated), discussion forums (like a Discord server for paying subscribers), a YouTube channel and so on.

      Not only new media; this would probably also work for schools, or any learning community.

    1. Tania Bubela. (2021, November 17). New resources on #COVID19vaccines & #pregnancy from the fantastic group @CDCofBC Indigenous Knowledge Translation Working Group. @HarlanPruden working to meet knowledge needs of Indigenous communities in ways that are meaningful. @ScienceUpFirst take note! @SFU_FHS @CaulfieldTim https://t.co/oK3WJUj9p6 [Tweet]. @bubela_tania. https://twitter.com/bubela_tania/status/1460776956379557889

    1. I don’t see something else naturally taking its place either.

      I like the idea of Discord as a backchannel but it suffers from the problem that it's a relatively niche app, and no-one is going to install and learn how to use it just for a conference.

      I think that Discord would work well for a learning community though.

    1. role of school as a community

      According to teachers, distance learning should be based on a school's strategy where everyone is equally committed and responsible for students

      1. how to structure to resolve equality
      2. equality after overcoming disparities
      3. securing equality will remain a permanent concern
    1. For low-carbon practices to grow and displace high-carbon ones, integrated action across disparate spaces and coordination between many different actors are necessary (161). For example, mobility scholars (166) highlight the extent of reconfiguration required to disassociate academia from high-carbon travel, including altered institutional cultures, funding practices, and student recruitment to support virtual ways of working. Although novel low-carbon practices may emerge, policy must ensure these stabilize and become prevalent, as well as impeding the circulation of high-carbon practices.

      A new social imaginary of cosmolocality, where we spend most of our time locally, but use information technology as the prime method for nonlocal communication. In other words, replacing transportation with lower footprint communications.

      https://wiki.p2pfoundation.net/Cosmo-Localism https://wiki.p2pfoundation.net/Cosmo-Localization https://medium.com/@joseramos_30450/the-cosmo-local-reader-invitation-to-participate-dbcb6248f54b

      In the field of production and provisioning systems, cosmolocal production implies designing and sharing designs globally, and downloading the appropriate ones for local clean production, thereby minimizing global supply chains.

      Graduated relocalization that begins to replace auto transportation with pedestrian and bike traffic can result in huge decarbonization impacts. This relocalization movement is also an economic reconfiguration, echoing what community economist Michael Shuman refers to as the movement from Wall Street to Main Street - decentralizing centralizing organizations when feasible, and creating more community wealth while decarbonizing unnecessarily long supply chains.

      https://michaelhshuman.com/store/

  5. Oct 2021
    1. Singanayagam, A., Hakki, S., Dunning, J., Madon, K. J., Crone, M. A., Koycheva, A., Derqui-Fernandez, N., Barnett, J. L., Whitfield, M. G., Varro, R., Charlett, A., Kundu, R., Fenn, J., Cutajar, J., Quinn, V., Conibear, E., Barclay, W., Freemont, P. S., Taylor, G. P., … Lackenby, A. (2021). Community transmission and viral load kinetics of the SARS-CoV-2 delta (B.1.617.2) variant in vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals in the UK: A prospective, longitudinal, cohort study. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 0(0). https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(21)00648-4

    1. iA Writer + Ghost

      This is the integration that I am using to connect my daily writing practice with the process of publishing. iA Writer and Ghost have enabled me to share my ideas and project intentions into the world in such a way that they have become indispensable tools for community building.

    1. Letting your member co-design with you on community products will strenghten this 3 level of relationships between your members : meet & connect level making things together level tell a story level

      .community design

    1. This is the real value of this approach: transforming an audience that by definition is passive or that has a minimum degree of interaction, into a group of active people who dynamically collaborate in the construction of a solution, of a benefit, of an asset.

      .community design

    2. The differences with a traditional service are precisely the metrics which, in addition to being quantitative, must be qualitative and must measure all three areas listed above: the system of identity, the engagement and the co-management of the community.

      .community design

    3. community design analyses and designs the interactions of the individual with the proposing organization, but also those of the individual as a member of a group, where he interacts with his peers and with the organization itself, and where he takes on an active role both in the design of the solution (co-planning) and in the organization (co-management).

      .community design

    4. Community design, unlike user-centred design, no longer focuses on the needs of people as individuals, but as members of a group (community), who recognize themselves around a value proposition.

      .community design

    5. designing a community certainly includes a part of immersion in the community itself, but first of all it includes the design of the context within which the members gather, move and grow.

      .community design

  6. theliturgists.com theliturgists.com
    1. THE SUNDAY THING

      The Sunday Thing

      The love of money is the root of all evil

      This week, Michael Gungor asked us to discuss money in our breakout groups.

      Money is power

      We outsource our power and authority to those who claim to have greater access to capital, because we underestimate and undervalue our own social influence, economic capacity, and political agency. The entreprecariat is designed for learned helplessness (social: individualism), trained incapacities (economic: specialization), and bureaucratic intransigence (political: authoritarianism). https://hypothes.is/a/667dOC0bEeyV6Itx3ySxmw

      Indigenous cultures in Canada were disempowered by outlawing the cultural practice of generosity (potlatch) and replacing the practice with centralized power over the medium of exchange: money. Money is a mechanism of disempowerment.

      Money is a shared story we tell ourselves about what has value. https://www.npr.org/transcripts/795246685

      We translated “ekklesia” as church. It is the deliberative body of the experiment in democracy in Athens, Greece. The people who are figuring out how to live together in the commons. The work of the people. The Liturgists.


      The Story of Money

      In this hour, On the Media looks at the story of money, from its uncertain origins to its digital reinvention in the form of cryptocurrency.

      On the Media: Full Faith & Credit


      Squid Game

      People were also discussing Squid Game.

      Squid Game was on my mind today before the call. “The reality of the history of Canada’s mining industry makes #SquidGame look like child’s play.” https://twitter.com/bauhouse/status/1449726452098682881?s=20

      The truth is that all of the gold that was mined out of the Klondike was under Indigenous land. There was no treaty with any of Indigenous peoples in the Yukon.

      Commons: Mining

    1. Muda is a virtual community started by a group of artists, teachers, cultural makers, social entrepreneurs, surfers, hackers, producers and dreamers.
  7. Sep 2021
    1. Solana NFT Marketplace Development

      The huge trend of non-fungible tokens has necessitated the creation of a digital environment to facilitate their exchange. NFT marketplace platforms dedicated to launching and trading NFTs offer a beneficial experience for both makers and takers.

      Maticz is a top-rated NFT Marketplace Development Company that offers premium Solana NFT marketplace development to help you to launch your own NFT marketplace platform that gives a seamless user experience and helps you to stand out from the competitors. Our Solana NFT marketplace platforms come with a robust trading engine, storefront, advanced searching filters, and so forth.

      Know more: Solana NFT Development >>>

    1. Potential is defined as the highest ecological status a riparian-wetland areacan attain given nopolitical, social, or economical constraints; it is oftenreferred to as the “potential natural community” (PNC)
    1. Local governments can use participatory “co-design” principles and practices to help ensure that their programs and products that use open data are designed to meet the needs of current and potential users.
    1. an umbrella term covering community planning, community architecture, social architecture, community development and community participation, all of which emphasize the involvement of local people in the social and physical development of the environment in which they live.
    1. Equity-Centered Community Design (ECCD) is a creative problem-solving framework developed by Creative Reaction Lab that supports the development of equity-centered approaches that will dismantle oppressive systems.
    1. Ontologies are inseparable from the communities in which they are being created and used [25].
    2. When opening up the definition of community in terms of community networks, with their broader, overlapping contexts, what is that mutual benefit? Of course, the communities making up the network focus on their own purposes, interests, and needs first. Still, through their intersecting socio-technical contexts, those purposes, interests, and needs partially connect the communities. This means that larger, overarching, common good constructs may become focal points of interest around which inter-communal joint purposes, interests, and needs can emerge, be more explicitly defined, linked more closely, and strengthened.
    3. community norms, values, goals, and ethics
    4. Community informatics (CI) is the application of information and communications technology (ICT) to enable and empower community processes [11].
    5. Communities are groups of people sharing social ties and interactions for mutual benefit—which can be a shared purpose, interest, or need—in a common space [8,9,10].
    6. This line of thinking has been solidified in the Community Informatics Declaration, which states that a just and equitable Internet provides recognition that the local is a fundamental building block of all information and communications and the “global” is a “federation of locals” [14]
    1. Building upon Sweeney and Rhinesmith’s approach, and bringing the conceptualizations of care [14,33,34], I propose the following framework:I define social practices as the acts of care performed by individuals and afforded by CTCs in order to promote self and community needs;Based on this study’s ethnography, I categorize social practices into three groups:Care work: the invisible work performed by the infomediaries, or any CTC worker, as described by Sweeney and Rhinesmith;Peer-to-peer care: individuals (CTC users) collaborating with each other so they can inform, take decisions, and strive towards their individual needs; andCommunity care: individuals (CTC users and infomediaries) acting collaboratively or individually in order to promote community wellbeing.It is important to emphasize that social practices also include other social acts that are not necessarily “care”, but given the interactions observed in the CTCs in the favelas, I chose an explicit care-focused lens as the basis of this framework in order to breakdown the social practices in a way that could help make a case for the importance of the CTCs beyond their ICT-focused roles.
    1. nd I'm usingAfrican very loosely, because Africa is complex and there are multiple African ways ofknowing.

      I find it interesting that the speaker felt the need to point this out, and I find it even more interesting that there are multiple African ways of knowing but they all come together as the greater country.

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  8. Aug 2021
    1. COGNITIVE CONSEQUENCES OF FORCED COMPLIANCE

      The title of the article immediately made me think of the world we are living in now. For example it is becoming more and more evident that the country has mixed opinions on the vaccine. The government, state agencies and other public entities are requiring proof of a vaccine to even enter the premises. Some companies are offering incentives across the country to incentivize the vaccine by offering free products and discounts. To an extent from a medical perspective you want everyone as healthy as possible, but from a freedom perspective it is on the verge of violating an individual's freedom of choice through forced compliance.

    1. (2) Dr Nicole E Basta on Twitter: “There is SO MUCH misunderstanding about what a #vaccine #mandate IS & what a vaccine mandate DOES. No one is calling for anyone to be banned. No one is calling for anyone to be forcibly vaccinated. Please, gather 'round and listen up, so you know what we’re talking about... 1/n” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved August 23, 2021, from https://twitter.com/IDEpiPhD/status/1428410251884302336?s=20

    1. Second, that you see more and more laptops running things like i3 and dwm than back in 2010 -- and these tools haven't gotten any better in these ten years.

      vim tools/plugins on the other hand have gotten supremely powerful & weird & awesome.

      i actually really love this point. there's some semi-interesting things happening with Wayland desktops, some changes, but overall i think most Linux users have kind of subsisted in semi-stasis. and we don't need top down change, from our WMs, but we should be "growing-in" to our environments, getting better, and we i think the collaboration & exploration is still very sparse, few charts or maps or guides come out. the "here be dragons" edge has a lot of healthy exploration deep into it, but it's very lone territory, the charts rare & hard to understand, hard to follow. there's some radical elements of success & exploration, but there are so few enduring wayfinding systems, so little communalizing of exploration or growth.

    1. Julia Raifman. (2021, July 25). Policymakers are pointing fingers at “the unvaccinated” What if they gave them a hand instead? - Bring vax & food to workplaces, schools, homes -Fund local doctors, including pediatricians, to call patients & deliver vax—Learn from success of Indian Health Service approach [Tweet]. @JuliaRaifman. https://twitter.com/JuliaRaifman/status/1419288641885593604

  9. Jul 2021
    1. Sergio: What about school?Rodolfo: School? One of the first memories I have from school, after Phoenix—I wasn't going to school in Phoenix, actually, I think I even skipped kindergarten—we moved to Long Beach, California. And the only thing I remember from school was my mom waking me up probably about four or five in the morning. The sun wasn't even out yet, and she would walk me to this random lady's house. Actually, she wasn't random, but she was just some lady I didn't know. There was two other kids there, and I would be in uniform. That was the first time I actually wore a uniform to go to school. I was there, but I didn't really remember that much. When we moved to Chicago, that's when everything changed.Rodolfo: I was a little bit older. I remember I went to Jordan Elementary. It was in the North side of Chicago. We were there for a very brief moment, because then we moved to Evanston. Evanston was literally right next to Chicago. The school I was attending was called Orrington Elementary. The reason why we moved, once again, is because she wanted a better quality of life for me. Where I was at, it was all English, there was no Spanish. Obviously, there were Hispanic kids who already spoke English, but there wasn't... She, herself didn't know English, so how could she teach me, so how could I be integrated into a school that doesn't even accommodate for individuals or kids who don't know English?Rodolfo: She moved schools, although we were still in Chicago because we needed... what was it? Proof of residency. We lived out of district, and she would get fined or I wouldn't be able to go to school there. The point is I went to school to Orrington Elementary. The program was called the TWI (Two Way Immersion). It was a bilingual program and that's where I learned my English, that school. Friends and everything. I feel as though like, that's why I learned my English so well, because I really, really wanted to learn it. I always heard kids at the park or at the store, at Target, at Jewels, or whatever and everybody spoke English, right? I just felt fascinated, I was intrigued by it.Rodolfo: It was a whole different language that I didn't know, and I wanted to master it. I wanted to be able to talk as they spoke, or talk as they talked. School was a very cool experience. I always had a lot of friends, and I was always the life of the classroom. I wasn't probably the best behaved kid, but I was always integrated in to what was going on with the school.Sergio: Do you remember any teachers or people?Rodolfo: Yeah, absolutely. Ms. Mule, Ms. Mule was my second or third grade teacher, I'm not sure which one it was. She was awesome, she always help me out with the English, always. Even in parent teacher conferences, she would literally always talk to my mom as if she'd be really interested. She would show genuine interest in what was going on with, not just me, but with the Hispanic kids. Kids who had trouble with English or weren't doing the best academically. She always would tell me, "Don't worry, you're gonna get it. You're gonna learn it." She had such a big heart.Rodolfo: Still even, my mother and I still talk about the teacher to this point in time. She tells me, "I remember Ms. Mule and she used to use hand gestures. She would always be like, 'Yeah, for this or for that.'" Even though I knew I wasn't the smartest or the most best behaved kid, she would always have that initiative to get us there. Get us to that point. Yeah, that was one of my favorite teachers. Man, I value that so much actually now. I miss that teacher. Another teacher was in fifth grade, his name was Mr. Stoom. He was Argentinian, he was from Argentina. He was another great teacher. He always told us, "Don't ever forget where you came from. Your roots are who you are, even though you all are coming from different parts of the world, don't ever forget who you are and where you come from." That's one of the biggest things right now, I'm kind of ashamed of.Rodolfo: I'm not, because I was so... What do they say, "Americanized." In Chicago, I was so in America. I never dedicated the time to open a book or even Google something of my home country. Now that I get here, I don't know what is going on. Just barely a couple of months ago, I found out Mexico is a third-world country. I didn't know that. I go to Polanco Fendi, Prado, Gucci, Armani, Louis Vuitton boutiques. To me, that's not a third world country. Yeah, that teacher was the one who started opening my eyes up more to my surroundings.

      Time in the US, School, Kindergarten, Elementary, Learning English/ESL, Teachers, Mentors, Cultural acceptance; Reflections, Identity, American; Time in the US, States, Arizona, California, Illinois

    1. Anne: Do you think being in the US changed your life, changed you in any significant ways?Juan: Yes, because I lived in Provo, where all the Mormons are, and most of them are humble, most of them are nice people. I guess I got used to that. So at the moment, right now, I don't think I will ever adapt to the way people are here in Mexico. I don't know if you've met Mexicans who are from not the center, but the outside of the cities, their personality is just a lot different than a US citizen. They have different thoughts, different priorities, which makes them have different personalities.Juan: In that way, I am thankful that I grew up in the US, because the way that I am, I consider myself somebody who's humble. I don't really like to get in discussions or stuff like that. I'd rather just do my own thing, be respectful to everybody. The way you treat me is how I will treat you, that's the way I will always treat people with respect and stuff like that. In that way, I am thankful that I grew up in the US because I do have a different lookout in life.Anne: What do you miss most about the US?Juan: The vegetation, the nature, because I remember in the US I can go out in the soccer fields and there's actual grass. The mountains.Anne: It's beautiful.Juan: Yes. That's what I miss most about it, the nature.

      Reflections, The United States, Favorite parts, missing, Mexico, Worst parts about being back

  10. Jun 2021