10 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2021
    1. I don’t see something else naturally taking its place either.

      I like the idea of Discord as a backchannel but it suffers from the problem that it's a relatively niche app, and no-one is going to install and learn how to use it just for a conference.

      I think that Discord would work well for a learning community though.

    1. The survey was vague -- the only product-specific query asked about a “Discord-native crypto wallet” -- but it showed that Discord was aware of the web3 community’s growing usage of its product and at least exploring how it might play in the space. 

      Discord might be mulling a native wallet.

    2. Discord’s bot ecosystem extends into crypto. In a recent piece on DAOs, The Generalist outlined a few integrations that have caught on with the web3 world. In particular, products like Collab.Land — which allows holders of unique tokens or NFTs to access private channels — have become essential. Other players in this subspace include Tip (accept crypto tips!) and Piggy (an RPG with crypto rewards).

      Discord integrates with web3. One example of this are channels that are only accessible for people holding a specific NFT.

    3. Discord allows for intra-group socialization, but also adds a social layer on top of this structure.

      Discord allows for intra-group socializations (like Slack), but also allows socialization across groups.

    4. Whereas Slack was clearly designed to be the home for one company and its employees -- each time you get invited to a new Slack workspace, you need to re-enter your email and go through the signup flow -- Discord was built for promiscuity. Discord users are expected to jump from server to server, and to slide into any other Discord user’s DMs. 

      Slack was designed for monogamous relationships between a user and their company, Discord was designed for promiscuity.

  2. Sep 2021
  3. Feb 2021
    1. The incipient pedagogical message in these sessions seems to be that teachers ought to adapt their approach to fit the technologies,
  4. Dec 2020
    1. Bots will be simpler to use. They’ll feel like natural extensions of Discord, polished products for desktop, web, and mobile users. Developers will get powerful new tools to take their creations to the next level. It’ll be easier to turn great ideas into code.
  5. Oct 2020
    1. Join my Discord here (Note access is now closed - DM me for an invite)

      I'm curious how this experiment turned out since it's been a while. Invite please (if you feel it's worked).

  6. Aug 2020
    1. Beyond its Slack-like functionality, Discord has functionality like a social graph, seeing what games your friends are playing, voice chat, etc. These have been misunderstood by the market. They aren’t random small features. They are the backbone of a central nervous system. Active users of Discord have it on all the time, even when they are not playing games. It’s a passive way to have presence with your friends. And when your friends start playing games it makes it easy to with one click go join them in the game. Bringing your actual social graph across all games. Finally, voice chat makes it possible to talk with your friends across all games, even when you are playing the game. Like when working in a google doc, having to switch out of your game to message is a negative experience. Instead Discord adds functionality to your games even while you are focused solely on them. We will see more companies understand and begin to work on this area.

      Discord, unlike Slack, is the central nervous system (or meta-layer) for the gaming market. You can see what games your friends are playing and join them in real time. You can talk with them while playing a different game.