199 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2021
    1. graphics are not really important in the grand scheme of things, even less so in puzzlers, but the diorama-like presentation of forests and cute animals immediately won me over, and I found small things like moving animals in the backround hours into the game. gotta admire the attention to detail.
    2. add some quality of life stuff like volume sliders, windowed mode, unlimited undo, etc.
    3. when it first came out, cubicity: slide puzzle was full of mobile shenanigans, but based on feedback the developers quickly 'de-mobilized' it during launch week
  2. May 2021
  3. Apr 2021
    1. Best Online Casino GamesPlay the best online casino games at the best recommended online casinos. Discover our guides to tips and tricks about online casino games.Online casino games – this is the most popular type of game for real money, which are played at online casinos. All online casinos have a huge selection of games. We only offer you the best free online casino games!
    1. The game is not too bad.. sweet graphics yet minimalistic.. but why the heck 1,5k achievements? I can barely concentrate on the levels because all the freaking achievements pop up all the time. One per level would have done the job just fine.. i love achievements.. but getting 1,5k for nothing is hideous.
    1. as it stands, this only goes to highlight what a miracle, what a classic for the ages Actraiser really is, whilst confirming itself as, unfortunately, one to avoid.
    1. Probably the only thing I'd like to see fixed now is the possibility of quick restart like in the old Timberman and not having to wait for the 'Game Over' screen to finally be back to the good ol' choppin'
    1. I really like the ideas in this game: the theme, what it's trying to accomplish (explore the problems with imperialism, if I understood correctly), the game board, the game in general. I want to like it.

      but, I don't think I would like this one enough due to the luck and relying on other players' whims (trading) mechanisms:

      • Dice Rolling
      • Push Your Luck

      You can risk a lot getting an expensive estate, but if you push your luck too much, your risk/gamble won't pay off and you'll permanently lose that [pawn] and those victory points.

    1. Just about everything players own can be exchanged at any time. The old promise system has been redesigned to provide players with the ability to give away future favors for crucial leverage in the heat of a negotiation. Players have never had so many ways to make a deal. 
    2. John Company offers players a new understanding of British history in the eighteenth and nineteenth century that reflects contemporary scholarship on the subject and extensive research into primary documents. John Company attempts to put the critical events of that time in their proper context and show how the imperial experience transformed the domestic culture of Britain. The East India Company lurked behind every building of a textile mill and every bit of wealth in a Jane Austen novel.  John Company is an uncompromising portrait of the people who made the Company and the British Empire what it was. It is as frank as it is cutting in its satire.  Accordingly, the game wrestles with many of the key themes of imperialism and globalization in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and how those developments were felt domestically. As such, this game might not be suitable for all players. Please make sure everyone in your group consents to this exploration before playing. 
    1. Unfortunately, there is some urgency to this effort. As Shashi Tharoor writes in his book Inglorious Empire (2018), over the past 30 years, there has been a tremendous bout of collective amnesia, espeically in the UK, about the history of empire and its consequences. Into this vacuum, revisionist historians of the worst kind like Niall Ferguson have capitalized on historical blind spots of people living today to make an absurd case for the benefits of empire. This cannot be allowed to happen. Tharoor believes that one of the best bulwarks against this erasure is to do the work of inquiry and to make the history of empire accessible and apparent to the widest audience. It is into this effort that I submit my work. John Company is an unsparing portrait that hopefully will give its players a sense of the nature of empire and the long half-life of its cultural production. It is certainly not the only way to make a game about empire, but I hope that it does its part in adding to our understanding of that subject and its continued legacy.
    1. Around &Bigger the box is bigger: 75mm high instead of 45mm or so.That was the main reason for the name &Bigger. The first edition does fit in its box but very tight. Because the first factory used bigger cardboard than planned. They told me about this "upgrade" after they produced the game. The thicker tiles (about 2.5mm) did feel good for the game so the &Bigger edition has the same
    1. The central decision of the game is when to play your houses. And you didn't even really talk about that.
    2. Few real decisions to make....Not in my experience, either in tile placement or in disk placement. Of possible interest is the thread:Informal experiment: how easy to find "the optimal disk placement" in various positions?wherein we see that even in the second phase, which people often complain is "automatic" or "obvious", the decisions are not necessarily obvious.
    3. However, it can be extremely frustrating placing the tiles. Very commonly there will be no position to place a tile in and it will be put to one side. Perhaps someone new to tile-laying games wouldn't find this so odd, but to anyone with experience of Carcassonne it will seem very limiting. In Carcassonne you can pretty much always place a tile, with several choices of position available. Every player I've introduced this game to has looked at me as if to say, "We must be doing something wrong." But no, that game is designed that way. Sometimes it feels like the map builds itself - there is often only one viable placement, so it starts to feel like a jigsaw, searching for that available position. Surely placing a single tile shouldn't be this difficult!

      I don't think I'd find it frustrating. I think I would enjoy the puzzle part of it.

      But indirectly I see that difficulty in placing tiles impacting my enjoyment: because it means that there are no/few meaningful decisions to be had in terms of where to place your tile (because there's often only 1 place you can put it, and it may sometimes benefit your opponent more than yourself) or which tile to place (because you don't get any choice -- unless you can't play the first one, and then you can play a previously unplayable one or draw blind).

    4. I recently played a prototype of an upcoming game called Bronze. This takes the tile-laying/ territory claiming mechanic and builds on it by adding abilities to each of the tiles. they benefit you in some way if you claim them. The result is a very similar feel to Fjords (competing for a share of the map) but with greater depth.
    5. Requires you to play multiple rounds (i.e. short games) to balance the scores
    6. Luck over-rides strategy
    7. You can't avoid the comparisons to Carcassonne even though the scoring mechanic is very different. It just looks the same, and the tile placement phase feels close enough to be familiar. However, this familiarity starts to nag at you, only adding to the frustration when tile placement is clumsy and luck-driven unlike Carcassonne. The comparison is not favourable for Fjords.
    8. There is a tendency in short luck-heavy games to require you to play multiple rounds in one sitting, to balance the scores. This is one such game. This multiple-rounds "mechanic" feels like an artificial fix for the problem of luck. Saboteur 1 and 2 advise the same thing because the different roles in the game are not balanced. ("Oh, well. I had the bad luck to draw the Profiteer character this time. Maybe I'll I'll draw a more useful character in round 2.") This doesn't change the fact that you are really playing a series of short unbalanced games. Scores will probably even out... statistically speaking. The Lost Cities card game tries to deal with the luck-problem in the same way.

      possibly rename: games: luck: managing/mitigating the luck to games: luck: dealing with/mitigating the luck problem

    9. You can strategise to a degree by trying to block off a potential peninsula (cut off between two mountains for example). This can start a little race to claim this area. e.g. I cut off an area with one of my houses. My opponent places another house deeper into the peninsula claiming it, so I place yet another on the peninsula. This little war does not (and cannot) last long, because you only have four houses each.
    10. You can strategise to a degree by trying to block off a potential peninsula (cut off between two mountains for example). This can start a little race to claim this area. e.g. I cut off an area with one of my houses.
    11. Luck is a major factor. As discussed above, sometimes the map seems to build itself and you draw tiles which you HAVE to place even though they are aiding your opponent.
    12. f you cannot place it, it is set aside for use later in the game if an opportunity arises. (Tiles are set aside a lot.)
    1. There are times when a piece CAN be played, but the options available lead to many strategic decisions:1) If I play it HERE, will it benefit me more than you?2) Does the placement force my hand to place another farm, and if so will I have a farm defecit compared to yours?3) Does this placement create a situation where I might be giving up first-play advantage (opening up a piece that had previously not been playable)?
    2. Actually, I think your wife's point is quite astute. Once you become very familiar with this game, there is almost too much deep planning in the moves.
    3. My wife's first description of playing Fjords was that it felt a bit like playing Othello, in that you had to think too far ahead. I don't see it that way. I think that the luck of the draw & the fact that a tile must be played if it can, means that you can't always plan too far ahead. Often you have to try to work out how to make use of what you've got.
    1. What's the point of playing a game featuring fjords without also including vikings to pillage the other player's lands...I've actually developed two additional tiles for Fjords: The Dragon and The Marauding Hoard. Both do exactly that.(I've play tested them with a friend well over 40 times and we both agree that with an expanded set of Fjords tiles, these two greatly improve the game for us. I'll write the tiles up and post them to BGG... eventually)
    2. you're quite the lucky man. i finally got my wife to agree to play fjords with me last weekend and, after beating me pretty soundly in two straight games, she announced she didn't like the game. turns out she didn't like the puzzle/board-building aspect of the game, the lack of aggressive play ("it would have been better if i could have fire-bombed some of your land") nor all of the 'action' taking place in the last minute or two of the game.drats.
    3. It's the first time that my wife and I have played Fjords together. She's not a gamer but we've recently been playing a few more games and she's been willing to try a few Eurogames (e.g. Carcassonne) and some of the kosmos 2-player games (Jambo, Odin's Ravens, Balloon Cup, Lost Cities) that I've borrowed from friends which is great. I manage to get a hold of a copy of Fjords and we have a go.I tell her that it involves spatial awareness and planning ahead. I explain the rules to her (having only played it once or twice myself and won each time), and she's doing her best not to roll her eyes; there's a definite lack of enthusiasm there.
    4. I tell her that it involves spatial awareness and planning ahead.
    1. It's as good as online-only, however with noone actually playing you'll find yourself queueing for bot matches (even having to wait for the "other players" to select their vehicles). You want to just race your mate in a local game- nope! Local races are single-player only (apparently the devs couldn't be bothered with coding a split-screen or zooming camera to enable local multiplayer races). Want to play online but specify the map? Nope! Play a game online with a good lobby and want to stick with that group? Nope! Every game forces you to exit after each event.
    1. Firstly, I don't like being thrown back into the menu every single time I fail a challenge, I prefer to be thrown right back in to it, maybe a "retry" option should be there to throw you right back in once you fail a challenge.
    1. As the project goes along, I’ll be posting some blogs about my design process and thinking around the game, and if you’re interested in my writing about games, I have written for both Meeple Mountain and Dicebreaker.
    1. It's really kind of sad that I want to play the game and form a better opinion of it and I can't because I have to wait for lives to regenerate.
    1. list of achievements does give you more incentive to replay the adventure if you're interested in that sort of thing.
    1. There has been some Quality-of-Life changes as well, which I really appreciate. For example, the long elevator in level 10 has been replaced with a teleporter. There's been some balance changes as well, but aside from level 10, I haven't checked them out.
    1. the game is designed in such a way that you don't need too many tries to figure out boss patterns or tricky platforming sections. Another nice feature is that you can warp between different areas so you don't have to do a bunch of backtracking.
    1. this game is - well not exactly bad, but it also isn't a very good game of the genre - there are some riddles and puzzles that can give you quite the headache. I like hard puzzles, I like games where all isn't quite obvious - but I also like a barrier-free gaming experience.
    1. The problem is the 'power-ups' (aka cheats?): the ice cubes, bombs, and especially the teleports. They seem needed to solve some levels (at least for 3 stars completion), but because they are widely available (5 of each / level) they are completely overpowered. Why would you try to solve a level without them, when you can use them? It removes the incentive to actually solve the puzzles the hard way. It breaks the game. Shame.
    1. these events can break the flow of the game and force the player to repeat sections until they master the event, adding false difficulty to the game.
    1. Reminds me ofo DVONN, but only with respect to disappearing hexes/spaces. DVONN is a much much better (actually strategic) game.

    1. A PvP level was added just for the sake of ♥♥♥♥♥ and giggles, the only purpose of this this is game is achievement farming.
    1. Academy Games has always prided itself in the quality of its rules. Most of our rules are taught in stages, allowing you to start playing as soon as possible without needing to read everything. We are very careful about the order we teach rules and rely heavily on graphics and pictures to facilitate understanding. We also include a large number of detailed picture examples, often with 3D renders, that help you understand the context of the rules.
    2. We also include a large number of detailed picture examples, often with 3D renders, that help you understand the context of the rules. For these reason, we generally don't start laying out the final rulebook until production art is complete. Writing and laying out a 20 page rule book like this generally takes about 3 months from start to finish, usually requiring a complete rewrite or two, and involves dozens of editors.
    3. We use an online editing program called ProofHQ, where you and our development team will review the rules, discuss ideas, and add comments and suggestions, so that these rules are of the same high quality as our other game rules. We have used this process for years, because integrating outside eyes and ears is an invaluable asset.

      having more eyes is better

  4. Mar 2021
    1. Proton is a new tool released by Valve Software that has been integrated with Steam Play to make playing Windows games on Linux as simple as hitting the Play button within Steam. Underneath the hood, Proton comprises other popular tools like Wine and DXVK among others that a gamer would otherwise have to install and maintain themselves. This greatly eases the burden for users to switch to Linux without having to learn the underlying systems or losing access to a large part of their library of games. Proton is still in its infancy so support is inconsistent, but regularly improving.
    1. This is yet another one of the sad, sad list of excellent games that Asmodee contracted someone to digitize for the least amount of money possible, and it shows. It's a pity, because they're excellent games, but if you don't have the patience for them, it's infuriating to go through all those hoops. Any user doing a QA session for 10 minutes would have told them most of these.
    1. We set out from the hypothesis that videogames may become interesting resources for their inclusion in the education processes in formal contexts
    1. This article demonstrates how Monte Carlo simulation can be used to solve a real-world, every day problem: Of these three games, which one will provide entertainment for my four-year-old yet let me retain my sanity? If your child is inflexible regarding changing the rules, choose Cootie or Chutes and Ladders which have similar average game lengths. Of the two, Chutes and Ladders is probably the more interesting because of the possibility of moving both forward and backward. If your child insists on Candyland, consider changing the rules as suggested above. An alternative strategy, of course, is simply to let your child cheat. This not only shortens the games, but has the additional incentive that it usually causes the child to win and puts them in a better mood (though it certainly doesn't teach much about ethics). On the bright side, in the few weeks it has taken to complete this study, we have progressed from board games to card games, specifically Uno, which are much more interesting for adults and children. Perhaps there is a God after all.

      The most awesome set of conclusions I've read in a paper in years!

    2. In each of the games moves are entirely determined by chance; there is no opportunity to make decisions regarding play. (This, of course, is one reason why most adults with any intellectual capacity have little interest in playing the games for extended times, especially since no money or alcohol is involved.)

      The entire motivation for this study.

    3. Monte Carlo simulation is used to determine the distribution of game lengths in number of moves for three popular children's games: Cootie, Candyland and Chutes and Ladders. The effect of modifications to the existing rules are investigated. Recommendations are made for preserving the sanity of parents who must participate in the games.

      And people say math isn't important...

    4. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Lou Scheffer</span> in Mathematical Analysis of Candyland (<time class='dt-published'>10/26/2007 21:55:07</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Based on my search, the game might be developed by neptun digital, an Android game called Brain On Physics Drop - Idle Balls Puzzle. It was released on Amazon, on June 29, 2017. Free.Later on Sep 4, 2017 it was put on google play store called Physics Brain Balls - Drop It On Dots. Free.Then in June 2018, its web browser version Love Draw released by Faramel Games. Free.Later here on Jan 9, 2019, Windows port showed up. Paid to play. Apart from all of this, the design of origin is simply modified based on a free game called Brain Dots released in 2015.A port doesn't deserve to be paid, let alone the origin of the port is not original at all.

      Not everything needs to be 100% original. People are allowed to charge money for their creations/work. "Porting" a game (probably writing from scratch if they are not the same developer) is not trivial.

    1. First off, achievement spam is not a selling point. In fact, this game broke my Steam client because it spams achievements. Whenever I closed it, it froze my client. What am I gonna do with there cheevos anyway? "Look, I got the achievement "Web 1720", am I cool now?"
    1. Good bit of content, but very little of it. 10€ for leviathans is a salty price for what it offers, if this was part of the Utopia DLC it's asking price of 20€ would have been easier to justify. Worth getting just to have more content in the game but paradox is really stretching by asking money for this little. Could/should have been a free update really.
    1. Try before you buy Here's a link to the game on Tabletopia: Judean Hammer on Tabletopia
    1. Shogi is a classic game. I know many people who want to play Shogi, but the Kanji on the pieces makes it too hard to master. I have designed this Shogi with icons so anybody can learn it easily.
    2. If you want to try playing to see how these pieces work in the game, you can playtest it on the Iishogi.org site (https://lishogi.org/).  Last year the Iishogi designer asked me to register the Design SHOGI pieces on their site.  This Iishogi.org is a free to play Shogi website.  I was willing to give them permission to use them.  You are free to play and switch pieces design from the piece variation section.  If you register your ID, then you can play vs the A.I. easily.  You can learn how the Design SHOGI pieces work there.
    1. a strategy game for me is mostly about the mechanics and the replayability. I love good art and design, but function follow form!
  5. Feb 2021
  6. www.metacritic.com www.metacritic.com
    1. Difficult enough to prove a worthy challenge, with an over-complexity that might have benefitted from a little self-restraint.

      overly complex = unnecessarily complicated

    1. This tedium would be unacceptable in an action game, but Windbound is a survival game. In survival games, death is supposed to mean something. Loss of progress represents the stakes; repetition is the barrier of entry.
  7. www.metacritic.com www.metacritic.com
    1. Please, do not buy this. I am really tired of "games" that are given critical praise because its cool to praise or because its political correct to do. I will break up my review in points so its clear why I dislike this "game" : 1) This is not a game. This is a short story, like an interactive book. 2) This game is so short, that I completed it in a 3 hour bus ride. It was boring. 3) Its a story of a girl that have to take the reigns of her life after divorce. WOMAN EMPOWERMENT. Now you know why this game is rated so highly 4) This is a MOBILE GAME. I paid $3 to play on an iphone (after watching a gaming channel give it GOTY contender. Needless to say, I never watched that gaming channel again). I FELT I WAS ROBBED OF TIME AND $3. Imagine how much I hated this game to feel like I was robbed even though it costed me only $3. 5) This game costs $7 on the eshop. You could buy CELESTE for $9 on sale on the Eshop. That is a great game. I recently bought Hollow Knight for $7 on Playstation. This interactive novel should not be sold as a game. Period. It is a waste of time and money.

      Nothing wrong with interactive novels being sold in the same store as games... as long as it's clear what it is (no false advertising).

      Somewhat agree with some of the other points...

    1. More and more, Im seeing this "retro graphics" (aka - lazy cash in.) money grab titles that are completely broken or absolutely terrible.. and they're RAPIDLY flooding the Switch like flies to horse dung. With no real reliable independent reviews of Indie titles available (Even MetaCritic is blank for at LEAST 70% of these indie garbage games..) players are left with no recourse but to flush hard earned cash on what is essentially a non-refundable gamble.
    1. Remember the helpful old man in the original Zelda for NES: "It's dangerous to go alone, take this [sword]" ? Well, TMF's tagline would be: "It's dangerous to go alone. Off you go, alone. Be careful, I guess."
    1. Choose from multiple unique paksets which offer different graphics and gameplay. Each pakset has different objects, buying prices, maintenance costs, themes and a whole unique gameplay. Every pakset is a new game.
    1. Transport Tycoon is easily one of the best Tycoon games, this variant offers indepth control over your logistic networks and zero breakdowns but with loads of new tools to get to grips with you will need to search up a guide.The other variant, OpenTTD, wants to remain more like the original. its not as precise in its logistics but much simpler to pick up and play.Both are multiplayerBoth are freeIf Simutrans feels abit obtuse, try OTTDIf OTTD feels too simple, try Simutrans
    1. As of today, you can Wishlist OpenTTD on SteamE. Historically, OpenTTD always had a single home from where we distributed the game. We used to be hosted on SourceForge (you know you are old, if you remember that being a thing :D), and slowly moved towards our own self-created distribution methods. These days, we mostly distribute our game via our website. But times are changing, and so is our hair. Over the last few months, we have silently been working to become a bit more visible in the world. Don’t worry, not for reasons you might think: OpenTTD has as many active users as it had in 2007. But more because we no longer think it is the right approach to only distribute via our own website.
    1. As of today, you can Wishlist OpenTTD on SteamE. Historically, OpenTTD always had a single home from where we distributed the game. We used to be hosted on SourceForge (you know you are old, if you remember that being a thing :D), and slowly moved towards our own self-created distribution methods. These days, we mostly distribute our game via our website. But times are changing, and so is our hair. Over the last few months, we have silently been working to become a bit more visible in the world. Don’t worry, not for reasons you might think: OpenTTD has as many active users as it had in 2007. But more because we no longer think it is the right approach to only distribute via our own website. This became painfully apparent when we noticed other people post OpenTTD on some stores. They are not always updated with new releases, sometimes even slacking behind a few years. And maybe more important to us: we can not guarantee that the uploaded version is unmodified and is the version as we intended. So, instead of fighting it, why not turn around and join them! Why not release our own, verified, builds on those stores! And this is exactly what we have been working on lately. And when I say “we”, a bit ironic to me, I mean the two developers that are around longest (myself and orudge) ;) A while back orudge added OpenTTD to the Microsoft Store. And today, I am happy to announce we will be on SteamE too! Well, we are on Steam, but we haven’t released anything there yet (sorry that I got your hopes up, just to squash them right after :( ). This is partially because of how Steam works, but also because we know we can bring a better experience for Steam with our upcoming release. That brings me to the most exciting news: if everything goes as planned, we will release OpenTTD 1.11 on Steam on the first of April, 2021! And that is not even an April fools’ joke! You can already Wishlist OpenTTD today .. and till we release on Steam, you can find our game via our website ;)
    1. Tired of games where there are tips and tutorials of all kinds and you can finish them without much difficulty?
    1. That fact that I am giving this little indie gem it's first review more than two full weeks after it launched shows the sad state on Steam of how the over saturation of asset flips and low effort garbage buries little treasures like this game.
    1. Ah, the old advertising games... It's kind of hard to explain for new generation of players, but back in the days we had games fully dedicated to certain brands. And they wanted us to pay for them. Don't get me wrong, I'm not talking about games like Zool and Biker Mice from Mars that used to include excessive product placement. Even some Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles games had it. I'm talking about games that were created solely to promote a certain brand. Like Pepsiman, where we played as that weird Pepsi mascot, or Avoid the Noid with the scary bunny-like... creature from Domino's (there was actually another game about him, but it was just a “hack” of somewhat popular Famicom game Kamen no Ninja: Hanamaru). Like I've said, it's kind of hard to explain, but back in the days, kids were less sarcastic, while Ads were... well, a bit more than just Ads.With no Internet, with TV being way more than it's today and with way, WAY less rules applied (because SEGA does what Nintendon't), Ads were more than just that annoying thing that interrupts Rhett and Link on YouTube. Those were almost art on their own. And the perfect scenario for a brand was to create the mascots so cool that everybody would want to buy merchandise with it. I mean, aside from the main product. Like, everybody loves Cap'n Crunch (huge fan here). But would you also pay for a PEZ dispenser with the man? Would you like a T-shirt? That's how it worked back in the days. And with video games starting to recover from large-scale recession of early 80s, when crappy products like Pepsi Invaders almost killed the entire market, we've got ourselves advertising games... that were actually quite good.Believe it, or not, but the games about 7-Up's Spot, Cheetos' Chester Cheetah and even McDonald's Ronald McDonald were actually pretty solid. And sometimes there were even games that tried to achieve more than that. From a fourth generation platformer with kickass soundtrack called Global Gladiators that used to include McDonald's kids Mick and Mack (previously included in the game called MC Kids, which wasn't as good) to a weird 3D action game called Darkened Skye, which featured magic system based on Skittles. Let's just say that advertising games were not as simple as you may think. And this one? Not only it's my most favorite game of the kind, it's, like, one of my most favorite puzzle games... ever. Together with The Incredible Machines, Supaplex and so on. It's that good.First of all, Pushover is a game that was made to promote a popular British snack Quavers (they're so curly!). Quavers are the curly potato puffs and their mascot, Colin Curly... just lost all of them. So, as Colin's ant friend, we need to go down through the ant hill to some caves (because reasons) and get them back. That's pretty much all the background we've got here. Nothing big, nothing really interesting, but... it doesn't matter. Like... at all. The thing is – Pushover is an action puzzle game, the story doesn't really matter in that genre, while gameplay-wise... well, like I've said, this game is totally awesome.Long story short, Pushover is all about the domino effect. You push (hence the title) one block and watch the others falling. Naturally, your goal is to drop all the blocks on level during the limited amount of time. After that, you'll be able to exit the current level and get the password for the next one. Which will be very useful, since the game comes with the whooping 100 levels, some of which will be pretty tricky. Sounds pretty dull, though, can't argue with that. I mean, who cares about domino, right? Pushing blocks on 100 levels... sounds boring, right? But it's not that simple.See, there are ten different types of blocks in this game. All with their own unique properties. And trying to figure out how to drop all blocks on the levels with just a couple of pushes? It's just fun. Very, very fun. So fun that I actually love this game more than Lemmings. And everybody knows just how fun Lemmings game is. Pushover is just... well, it's hard to explain, but it's one of those games, which just “click”. It's one of those games, in which “stars” aligned perfectly. Controls are simple enough, the puzzles are very interesting and tricky (but not too tricky to make you feel bad), the graphics is very cute, the sound has that awesome “Sound Blaster” feeling... Pushover is just one of those games that you can't stop playing. 28 years later? I still can't get enough of it. And it's not just me. Even though the game was ported to quite a lot of systems (there was even SNES version with all Quavers Ads completely removed), there was a fan-made remake released in 2006. Guess, it says something.What we have here is a 100% original (not remade) DOS version (runs through DOSBox), but guess what? No complains here. Even though very often Amiga versions had better music, Pushover was not one of such games (I totally prefer the DOS sound), while all “big three” versions (Amiga, Atari ST and DOS) look almost identical and I'm not a big fan of those “filters” from fan-made remake. I mean... it's pretty cool version and stuff, but... there's nothing like the original.So, yeah. I can't recommend this game enough. Pushover is charming, cute, smart and extremely addicting puzzle game from early nineties. You like games like Lemmings, Bomberman, Wrecking Crew and so on? You should totally check this one out. Like the original Goonies (which also got fan-made remake, by the way), this game is a forgotten gem from the past. It's in my Steam favorites and it'll stay there forever. I love it that much. Dixi.
  8. Jan 2021
    1. Really the only knock I have against short games is that there’s not more of them to enjoy. I’m not a believer in any arbitrary dollar-to-hour formula, and I prefer compact, complete experiences to meandering, padded-out ones. Games like Tiny Dangerous Dungeons are a great example of the quality you can wring from short romps, in part by limiting the potential for frustration and confusion. It’s a game that’s over as soon as it feels like it’s getting going, but if that’s the worst thing you can say about a game, I’d call that a keeper.
    1. It kills me this game didnt end up a classic in the minds of all gamers. People should scoff at new games and say "Dear god, why couldnt you do what a disney game thats demo was given away for free with kids meals at mcdonalds do, why cant you even manage to be as good as "Battle at Procyon"
  9. Dec 2020
    1. black Americans serve a crucial function for the white bourgeoisie. As the emblem and proof of America’s illegitimacy, they anchor a politics of repudiation in which the idea of a common good has little purchase.

      That is the reason they must be kept where they are or where we believe them to be. The narrative on America cannot be maintained if weren't being victimised. It is our moral compulsion to discredit America even if we have to victimise black americans ourselves. For the greater good you see.

  10. Nov 2020
  11. Oct 2020
    1. Playing video games as a child can improve working memory years later
      • Studies have shown that playing video games can lead to brain structure changes, but new study shows changes can happen even years after people stop playing.
      • The study lasted a month, and involved 27 people between 18 and 40 years old, with and without experience in gaming.
      • Those who played a lot before becoming adults performed better with working memory tasks, which require you to mentally hold and manipulate information.
      • They also did better at processing 3D objects, but after a period of video game training, non-gamers were able to catch up in this area.
      • Video games are great to strengthen mental skills, however these improvements have limited effect on activities not linked to gaming
    1. The net result is that in gaming, clever new interface ideas can be distinguishing features which become a game’s primary advantage in the marketplace.

      Innovation in the video game industry helps it solve the public goods problem. Tweaking the economics helps the high upfront development cost be recouped.

  12. Aug 2020
    1. you could imagine my extreme disappointment after i came back after a year and a half to find that the entire exploration map was about 80% smaller, every different island was within clear view of your starting island completely decimating any sense of adventure or exploration you could have had.Almost all materials could be collected and all items built within four and a half hours. Islands are literally numbered one to five to display they're level of danger.not only that but you were practically spoon fed each advancement in the game, it feels like it was taken from a greatly ambitious open world, exploration survival game that would take months to finish and achieve everything in. To now being an arcade style iphone app game catered to ten year olds that would foolishly enter their parents card details in order to buy 10,000 roblox coins.
  13. Jul 2020
  14. Jun 2020
    1. Oh, and of course, there’s the fact that “sit on the ground” is mapped to the same control as “strangle the nearest person”, which can apparently lead to some pretty robust brainstorming sessions.

      I love this!