12 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
    1. Kustin, T., Harel, N., Finkel, U., Perchik, S., Harari, S., Tahor, M., Caspi, I., Levy, R., Leschinsky, M., Dror, S. K., Bergerzon, G., Gadban, H., Gadban, F., Eliassian, E., Shimron, O., Saleh, L., Ben-Zvi, H., Amichay, D., Ben-Dor, A., … Stern, A. (2021). Evidence for increased breakthrough rates of SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern in BNT162b2 mRNA vaccinated individuals. MedRxiv, 2021.04.06.21254882. https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.04.06.21254882

  2. Feb 2021
    1. Andrew💙Croxford. (2020, December 3). NEW THREAD: possible development of anti-Syncytin responses after immunization with the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein-coding mRNA vaccines, based on a ‘homologous’ region shared between these proteins. [Tweet]. @andrew_croxford. https://twitter.com/andrew_croxford/status/1334593606196187136

  3. Jan 2021
    1. mRNA vaccines are a new type of vaccine to protect against infectious diseases. To trigger an immune response, many vaccines put a weakened or inactivated germ into our bodies. Not mRNA vaccines. Instead, they teach our cells how to make a protein—or even just a piece of a protein—that triggers an immune response inside our bodies. That immune response, which produces antibodies, is what protects us from getting infected if the real virus enters our bodies.
    1. the mRNA in the vaccine contains instructions to tell our body how to build a coronavirus spike protein. As soon as we do that, our immune system freaks out, as it’s supposed to, and creates antibodies to the spike protein. The mRNA is destroyed shortly after the injection, but the antibodies stick around. They can then recognize the real virus if we ever encounter it in the wild.
  4. Nov 2020
  5. Aug 2020
    1. Corbett, K. S., Edwards, D. K., Leist, S. R., Abiona, O. M., Boyoglu-Barnum, S., Gillespie, R. A., Himansu, S., Schäfer, A., Ziwawo, C. T., DiPiazza, A. T., Dinnon, K. H., Elbashir, S. M., Shaw, C. A., Woods, A., Fritch, E. J., Martinez, D. R., Bock, K. W., Minai, M., Nagata, B. M., … Graham, B. S. (2020). SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccine design enabled by prototype pathogen preparedness. Nature, 1–8. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-020-2622-0

  6. Jul 2020