18 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. Bird sound encoding

      I was at the bookstore yesterday and ran into two new useful resources that looked interesting in this space.

      Specific to birdsong, there was

      200 Bird Songs from Around the World by Les Beletsky (Becker & Mayer, 2020, ISBN: ‎ 978-0760368831)

      Read about and listen to birds from six continents. A beautiful painting illustrates each selection along with concise details about the bird's behavior, environment, and vocalizations. On the built-in digital audio player, hear each bird as it sings or calls in nature with audio of the birds provided by the Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

      This could be useful in using the book itself as a memory palace in addition to the fact that the bird calls are built directly into the book for immediate playback while reading/memorizing. There are a few other related books with built in sound in this series as well.

      The other broader idea was that of

      "A bird a day"

      I saw the book A Bird A Day by Dominic Couzens (Batsford, 2021, ISBN: 978-1849945868) to help guide one towards learning about (or in our context maybe memorizing) a bird a day. It had names, photos, and other useful information which one might use to structure a palace to work at in small chunks. I know there are also many other related calendars which might also help one do something like this to build up a daily practice of memorizing data into a palace/journey/songline.

      The broader "Thing-a-day" calendar category might also be useful for other topics one might want to memorize as well as to have a structure set up for encouraging spaced repetition.

  2. May 2021
    1. @doughoff Thanks for kicking this off. I'm relieved to see someone else occupied (personally I'm worried) with this topic.

      I've recently begun some work on memorizing birds in North America. Bird song is one of the more intimidating areas for me as I have absolutely zero knowledge of music beyond a pair of functioning ears.

      In my early searches for a comprehensive text to work from, I did note that the book Birds of North America (Golden Field Guides series) by Chandler S. Robbins, & Bertel Bruun, and Herbert S. Zim (St. Martin's Press, 2001) was one of the few guides that dealt with birdsong and had a short section on the subject in the front and listed visual sonograms for most birds. Sadly, the book didn't include audio which I think may have been incredibly helpful in matching the sound with the visuals.

      I have bookmarked a few websites that deal with it, though there are sure to be many others that match birdsong audio to a visual representation of some sort. Here are a few of those:

      Initially I imagined that through direct experience in listening and viewing these sonograms, I might come to some sort of facility with them. Next I would potentially rely on the concept of pareidolia to come up with some images to attach to them.

      In any case, I thought I'd sketch out my general plan and some of the resources and words I'd come across to see if they may be of help to others. I'm looking forward to seeing what others may have come up with or used as well. Birdsong will assuredly be the last piece of the puzzle that I build into my bird repertoire.

      Incidentally, after having done some significant library searching and bird guide/handbook review, I've chosen Birds of North America, Francois Vuilleumier (Dorling Kindersley, 2020, ISBN:978-0-7440-2053-3) as my "bible" for it's structuring of bird families, photographs, descriptions, and variety of data about birds and their ranges. It's about as comprehensive (for my area of the world) as anything out there, is well laid out, and sort of makes its own method of loci based on page layouts and color schemes. It is too large to take out into the field easily, but I find that working on storing the data is easier in the comfort of the house than the wilderness.

      I'll also note that it has representative visual flight diagrams which may be relatively easy to categorize and therefore memorize bird flight patterns. If others have better or more detailed resources for this, I'd love to know those as well.

      bird flight patterns.PNG|630x500, 75%

  3. Mar 2021
  4. Mar 2020
    1. Birds of Prey: Black Mask's Suit is Trending Everywhere

      Bringing characters on to the big screen, DC Comics has been a step ahead of Marvel Comics, it's longtime rival, in terms of giving cinematic life to its underrated super villains like Roman Sionis Black Mask.

      Featured in Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey, Black Mask is a crime lord who rules over the underground world of the city of Gotham. Kind of a maniac who loves taking delight in torturing the innocents, Roman is one of the ugliest men to live in Batman's city.

      As the story goes on and Black Mask is featured in Birds of Prey, you can rush to the nearby cinema to watch the DC Comics' latest film based on the supervillain character of Harley Quinn while knowing more about one of the biggest criminal-minded figures to exist in Gotham.

      Although Birds of Prey has already been watched by thousands of DC Comics fans, many have taken it to social media and other online forums to admire the wardrobes of each and every character featured in the film.

      While Harley Quinn's multi-colored wardrobe has already received millions of likes on social media, Black Mask's corporate slave like an outfit is also earning a considerable number of likes and comments for the masterminds behind it.

      A mind blogging attire featuring a unique pattern, the so-called Black Mask Birds of Prey Suit is a wardrobe better than many of the rivals of the supervillain. Specifically, when you compare it with the formal wardrobe given to Batman or Superman, you tend to find a great difference allowing the former to look better than the latter.

      The difference is so striking that, regardless of the nature of the character, you might prefer Roman's suit with your eyes closed. Ironically, despite the fact, Roman is an ugly creature with no beautiful face to show the world, his style, and manly attitude while meeting his counterparts or rivals put him on top of the list of the worth-following characters in the world of DC Comics.

      You check out every other wardrobe rocked by the supervillain and you will find an immense level of creativity dominating his clothing style. This absolutely indicates, the bad guy cares about his physical features and tries his level best to get rid of the ugliness showered to him by an accident during his birth. Every other outfit of Black Mask is surely the result of the inferiority complex surrounding the supervillain from the very first day and often making him think like a useless creature with nobody to love him which makes him put on the luxurious wear to overcome the destructive thought patterns while allowing him to deal with the unworthy phenomenon of inferiority.

      Although it should be very clear, ever since the wealthy character Roman has been featured in Harley Quinn's solo film, the number of his fans has jumped from thousands to millions with most of them are among the die-hard fans of his passion for fashion.

      The very well developed, finely designed and greatly stitched black suit sported by Black Mask is a great piece to be considered for formal parties and get together events with the formal clothing theme. Regardless of who the suit has been inspired from, you could choose to try it for a fascinating yet hot appearance while hoping to be admired by the self-proclaimed fashion gurus in your friend list. If there is anything worthy that Roman's character has given to his fans and that could be added to an apparel collection as something special reminding of him then it's his sizzling hot suit with perfection dominating it from bottom to the top.

  5. Jan 2020
    1. Yet aside from humans, only a few other species, including orangutans and bonobos, seem to willingly help others. Now, scientists say they’ve found the first nonmammals that are also altruists: African gray parrots.

      Parrots!

  6. Apr 2019
    1. An artist impression of the Kogarah North Precinct wih Georges River Girls High School on the right.

      These sort of renders have a lot to answer for.

  7. Feb 2019
    1. I would be remiss in not mentioning Pres. Roosevelt’s great friend and ally Winston Churchill who not only helped end World War II but was a lover and companion to a number of parrots.

      I have never seen a picture with Winston Churchill and parrots. It raises him higher in my esteem. I bet they swore also.

    2. Pol was taught to swear and screamed curse words at his funeral. The African Grey had to be ejected from the funeral ceremony when he started cursing in both English and Spanish, all learned from the president!

      Seems like Jackson had the last laugh!

    3. she heroically rescued the parrot as the fire was engulfing the White House. 

      This should be the story that everyone knows!

    1. One raven in the experiment figured out how to work their rock/box contraption first, then began teaching the method to other ravens, and finally invented its own way of doing it. Instead of dropping a rock to release a treat, the future Ruler of the Raven Kingdom constructed a layer of twigs in the tube, and pushed another stick down through the layer to force it open. The bird had to be removed from the experiment before it could teach any other birds how to do it.

      This is so cool! (Until they take over the world, that is...)

  8. Dec 2017
    1. Yesterday’s Delta Boeing 717 flight DL1943 from Detroit to Atlanta became a 22 minute trip from Detroit to Detroit when there was a bird discovered flying around the cockpit. And it wasn’t the first time a bird flew around the cockpit that day on that plane.

      What the heck?

  9. Jun 2017
  10. Mar 2017
    1. This bird was thought to have been extinct for 100 years, with the creature passing into birding legend. Now, researchers have announced that they have found a population of the rare parrots hiding deep in the bush of Western Australia.

      Wow, incredible!!

  11. Jul 2016
    1. Bird eyes have had eons longer to optimize. Along with their higher cone count, they achieve a far more regular spacing of the cells.
    1. Bird eyes have had eons longer to optimize. Along with their higher cone count, they achieve a far more regular spacing of the cells.
  12. Oct 2013
    1. Something of this kind we see birds practice, which divide food collected in their beaks among their tender and helpless young ones, but when they seem sufficiently grown, teach them, by degrees, to venture out of the nest and flutter round their place of abode, themselves leading the way, and at last leave their strength, when properly tried, to the open sky and their own self-confidence.

      Great metaphor. My tutoring center would love this quote