2 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2020
    1. Birds of Prey: Black Mask's Suit is Trending Everywhere

      Bringing characters on to the big screen, DC Comics has been a step ahead of Marvel Comics, it's longtime rival, in terms of giving cinematic life to its underrated super villains like Roman Sionis Black Mask.

      Featured in Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey, Black Mask is a crime lord who rules over the underground world of the city of Gotham. Kind of a maniac who loves taking delight in torturing the innocents, Roman is one of the ugliest men to live in Batman's city.

      As the story goes on and Black Mask is featured in Birds of Prey, you can rush to the nearby cinema to watch the DC Comics' latest film based on the supervillain character of Harley Quinn while knowing more about one of the biggest criminal-minded figures to exist in Gotham.

      Although Birds of Prey has already been watched by thousands of DC Comics fans, many have taken it to social media and other online forums to admire the wardrobes of each and every character featured in the film.

      While Harley Quinn's multi-colored wardrobe has already received millions of likes on social media, Black Mask's corporate slave like an outfit is also earning a considerable number of likes and comments for the masterminds behind it.

      A mind blogging attire featuring a unique pattern, the so-called Black Mask Birds of Prey Suit is a wardrobe better than many of the rivals of the supervillain. Specifically, when you compare it with the formal wardrobe given to Batman or Superman, you tend to find a great difference allowing the former to look better than the latter.

      The difference is so striking that, regardless of the nature of the character, you might prefer Roman's suit with your eyes closed. Ironically, despite the fact, Roman is an ugly creature with no beautiful face to show the world, his style, and manly attitude while meeting his counterparts or rivals put him on top of the list of the worth-following characters in the world of DC Comics.

      You check out every other wardrobe rocked by the supervillain and you will find an immense level of creativity dominating his clothing style. This absolutely indicates, the bad guy cares about his physical features and tries his level best to get rid of the ugliness showered to him by an accident during his birth. Every other outfit of Black Mask is surely the result of the inferiority complex surrounding the supervillain from the very first day and often making him think like a useless creature with nobody to love him which makes him put on the luxurious wear to overcome the destructive thought patterns while allowing him to deal with the unworthy phenomenon of inferiority.

      Although it should be very clear, ever since the wealthy character Roman has been featured in Harley Quinn's solo film, the number of his fans has jumped from thousands to millions with most of them are among the die-hard fans of his passion for fashion.

      The very well developed, finely designed and greatly stitched black suit sported by Black Mask is a great piece to be considered for formal parties and get together events with the formal clothing theme. Regardless of who the suit has been inspired from, you could choose to try it for a fascinating yet hot appearance while hoping to be admired by the self-proclaimed fashion gurus in your friend list. If there is anything worthy that Roman's character has given to his fans and that could be added to an apparel collection as something special reminding of him then it's his sizzling hot suit with perfection dominating it from bottom to the top.

  2. Feb 2020
    1. The coat is a use value that satisfies a particular want

      Marx: "Yesterday I pawned a coat dating back to my Liverpool days in order to buy writing paper" (Karl Marx and Frederick Engels, Collected Works, vol. 38 [1852-55]: 221).

      On the significance of Marx's coat, see Peter Stallybrass, “Marx’s Coat,” in Border Fetishisms: Material Objects in Unstable Spaces, ed. Patricia Spyer (New York: Routledge, 1998): 183–207. [PDF].