66 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2019
    1. eetingthechild-renandotherswhoweredisposedtoco

      on Sabbaths when there was no interpreter, the children and anyone else free was collected to read scripture to

    2. eligiousexerciseontheSabbathfortheIndians

      Sabbath exercise for the Natives at La Pointe

    1. urgeonmooisaWood--1113wuc19.tm~11]1-wayintheF

      Dr. Wood's wife is the only woman at Fort Snelling

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    1. The Daily Beast got it right with a subhead about a recent right-wing terrorist, the one who blew himself up in his home full of bomb-making materials: “Friends and family say Ben Morrow was a Bible-toting lab worker. Investigators say he was a bomb-building white supremacist.”

      The Daily Beast quote is found here.

    2. quiet, ‘nerdy’ young man who came from ‘a tight-knit, godly family

      Found here and also on their site.

    3. a gentle loner

      Here is the quote, later changed to "a loner".

  2. Jul 2019
  3. Jun 2019
    1. AfterDoct..vaccinatectheIndc.prezent,hoembarkedinacanoeforthenotoVaccinaho.la.werethe

      at an exchange of gifts, the Natives present are vaccinated and those in the gardens are looked for to be vaccinated

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    1. Warren’

      I suppose I may be a bit biased, being a "Warren" college student. ; ) In all honesty however it is likely that it is the high profile nature of the claim, and the intense politicization that brings so much publicity to this particular case.

    2. Donald Trump, have mocked the senator’s claims by calling her “Pocahontas.”

      Wow! such a shame :(

    3. Ultimately, the panel expressed hope that instead of continuing to double down on her ancestry claims

      What more can Elizabeth Warren do to placate the Cherokee? It looks like this might seriously hurt her campaign, and if she does become president, then this could simply sour relations between the United States and the Cherokee. Some have accepted her apology, and “understand that she apologized for causing confusion on tribal sovereignty and tribal citizenship and the harm that has resulted,” Julie Hubbard, a spokeswoman for the tribe said. “The chief and secretary of state appreciate that she has reaffirmed that she is not a Cherokee Nation citizen or a citizen of any tribal nation.”

      But others are still not satisfied. “This still isn’t transparent,” said Twila Barnes, a Cherokee genealogist who has been critical of Ms. Warren’s claims of native ancestry since it became national news in 2012. “She needs to go public and say she fully takes responsibility and that the DNA test was ridiculous. There is still something about this that feels off.” It seems that only time will tell in this case. https://www.nytimes.com/2019/02/01/us/politics/elizabeth-warren-cherokee-dna.html

    4. eugenics

      I believe the precise term to be used here is Anthropometry, or human measurement, which was a key aspect of pre-genetic Eugenic ideology, and continues today in genetic biology, under more 'subtle' labels such as euthanizing, sterilizing, or preventing intermarriage between people with 'genetic diseases.' http://www.eugenicsarchive.org/html/eugenics/static/themes/6.html (I mean i'm not saying I am denying genetic disease research and treatment is based on science, but so was eugenics back in the day, it's just science has 'improved' since then... or has it? Maybe, but it is policy that is more important in these regards.)

    5. “Native nations have a fundamental right to weigh in when one makes a claim to kinship.”

      What does this mean exactly? This is extremely important and I don't know exactly what is being articulated here.

    6. ancestry, background, and blood, rather than citizenship, nationhood, and sovereignty, which subtly undermines recognition and the sovereign status of tribal nations.

      This isn't really subtle at all. Most of the public I speak to outside of my family and college seem to view Native Americans as a racial classification that receives certain government benefits as reparations based on past discrimination. Reservations tend to be spoken of as segregated zones, rather than sovereign nations. Public misconceptions by Non-Natives seem to inform the issue.

    7. Warren’s statement betrays a deep misunderstanding of Native nationhood. “Even though histories of colonialism have made our processes of defining citizenship messy, complicated, painful, and even racist,” he said, “Native nations have a fundamental right to weigh in when one makes a claim to kinship.”

      This statement is vague because it does not clarify what the misunderstanding is, and what it means to weigh in, and precisely what kinship means. Ethically, what is the distinction here? Did Warren make an ethical violation when she publicly claimed to have Cherokee ancestry, without first notifying tribal authority? What constitutes as kinship, versus ancestry. It seems to take the power away from individual identity, and grant it to institutions. It is an opportunity cost of self-determination. What would be the proper course of action for Warren to take afterwards? Make a public apology, or publicly make a statement denying kinship?

    8. “I am not enrolled in a tribe, and only tribes determine tribal citizenship. I understand and respect that distinction. But my family history is my family history.”

      Based on this Rhetoric, she sounds sincere, but what is so controversial about this statement? Are there other statements where she made different kind of claims?

    9. “They all descend from full-blooded Cherokee great-grandmothers,”

      Assimilation and 'whitewashing' could indeed produce a large number of un-enrolled people who are of Cherokee descent, and also produce false accounts where people genuinely believe they have some Cherokee ancestry but are mistaken based on an old family story. What is implied here is that there is a malicious, intentional fabrication of Native Ancestry to advance one's own personal agenda. There is a fine line between a claim that should illicit the response, "Really? How neat, what an interesting heritage story," and "I see under race/ethnicity you put down 'Cherokee' on your application. That is very serious claim, do you have any documentation?" I think there is a difference. How harmful is it for someone to claim 'unofficial' or unverifiable ancestry, and what problems does this present? How should these be viewed/enforced differently.

    10. “I Have a Native Ancestor”

      Only a fraction of a percentage of Americans claim to be Cherokee, but high profile cases make a big impact. "In 2000, the federal census reported that 729,533 (0.26%) Americans self-identified as Cherokee. By 2010, that number increased, with the Census Bureau reporting that 819,105 (0.26%) Americans claimed at least one Cherokee ancestor" https://slate.com/news-and-politics/2015/10/cherokee-blood-why-do-so-many-americans-believe-they-have-cherokee-ancestry.html

      About 300,000 Cherokee are enrolled, so that is under half of all Americans who claim to be of Cherokee descent. In other words, there is about 3 Americans who claim to be Cherokee for every 2 enrolled Cherokee. It is difficult to say how big of a problem this really is; it could be a minor inconvenience, or it could be a catastrophic threat. It is difficult to say how this should or can be enforced. It could be that a simple fine could dissuade people, or even a public service announcement, or this may be a breach of freedom of speech. Maybe only in instances where fraud is involved, for financial gains or in high profile cases? It is hard to say.

    1. Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System

      We hope you enjoy our curations of blockchain content across the internet as well as our guides. You can find us at https://ethdocs.github.io and join the conversation!

  4. May 2019
    1. She’d become a devotee of Joe Sobran, the late Catholic columnist who was fired from National Review after falling out with William F. Buckley and whose writings deeply influenced the paleoconservative movement, which emphasizes nationalism and noninterventionism. Over the course of his career, Sobran’s writing on Israel and Jews became extreme, and he associated with Holocaust deniers and questioned Holocaust history. McHugh had liked Ron Paul, for whom she was slightly too young to vote in 2008, so a friend at church had told her to read Sobran’s “The Reluctant Anarchist.” In the piece, written in 2002, Sobran describes how he moved away from the ideology of mainstream conservatism and toward becoming a “philosophical anarchist.” Sobran opposed the concept of the state as a unifying force of government; he opposed the very idea of so-called constitutional government. The argument made sense to the budding young libertarian in Pennsylvania. “That was my step into the right,” she said. “I think I’ve read every single thing Sobran’s ever written.” Sobran’s death was also her introduction to even further-right media; when he died in 2010, her online search for obituaries led her to the VDare and American Renaissance websites, she said.

      Sobran as entry into white supremacy

  5. americanlibrariesmagazine.org americanlibrariesmagazine.org
    1. Wi-Fi in the “White Space”Unused TV spectrum offers libraries potential for rural broadband

      Este debate no se ha dado en bibliotecas y resulta muy interesante. Sigue la línea del Foro de Gobernanza de Internet

  6. Apr 2019
    1. Two concepts that I’ve been thinking about a lot lately are guilt and responsibility. When it comes to racism in America, I think that guilt and responsibility tend to be seen as more or less the same thing. But I’m beginning to understand how there’s a real difference. As white people, are we guilty for the sins of our forefathers? No, I don’t think so. But are we responsible for them? Yes, I believe we are.
  7. Feb 2019
    1. This is not the first time that the US “common man” has embraced populism. Who said the following? “What are the real issues that exist today in these United States? It is the trend of pseudointellectual government where a select elite group have written guidelines in bureaus and court decisions… looking down their noses at the average man on the street … the auto workers, … the little businessman…” (quoted in Cowie: http://digitalcommons.ilr.cornell.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1919&context=articles) This was George Wallace, in 1972, the year he scored a victory in the Democratic primary in Michigan, due primarily to “working-class” opposition to school busing on the heels of white flight to the suburbs. His “populist” message of “anti-elitism”, “anti-crime” and anti-busing wasn’t openly racist, but that was its content. Dewey Burton, the young male symbol of the 1970s (white) working class followed for years by the US media (as told by Cowie, above) was not a racist in his personal attitudes, but his alienation from ossified New Deal politics within a Fordist economic model that provided “only” high-wage job security (and for fewer and fewer people) manifested itself in a form that is fairly indistinguishable from the suddenly new “revolt” of the white working class in the rust belt in 2016 – and this well before Fordism entered into its terminal crisis later in the 70s.

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    1. Persuade

      Here it is with a "u."

      I'm beginning to think the contemporary insistence (can I say "fanaticism?") with spelling is just that: contemporary.

      Perhaps another gift from Strunk and White.

  8. Jan 2019
    1. “那些所谓的‘白皮书’描述的目标非常宏大,原本只是想做行业某一方面的应用,却拔高到想要做一条全新的底层公链。事实上,若想开发一条完整的区块链底层公链,必须具有在行业应用方面独特的技术创新,并且能够实现稳定运行。这显然不是一般行业应用团队可以实现的事情。”

      <big>评:</big><br/><br/>市面上的多数白皮书是否都在摊大饼?或许在回答这个问题前,我们应该多多学习李笑来「不断厘清自己概念」的精神。为什么原本属于 Business Plan 范畴的文档会被冠以 “White Paper” 的称号?在维基百科的词条里我们可以找到如下定义:</br></br>A white paper is an authoritative report or guide that informs readers concisely about a complex issue and presents the issuing body's philosophy on the matter.

      White papers are a "... tool of participatory democracy ... not [an] unalterable policy commitment."

      "White papers have tried to perform the dual role of presenting firm government policies while at the same time inviting opinions upon them."</i></br></br> “authoritative” 一词在精神上与 “decentralized” 构成对立,但前者却是迄今为止所有组织都偏好的行动范式,甚至喜欢到了上瘾的地步。人们很难揣测第一个在密码社群抛出 “White Paper” 概念的人是否对此概念有细致的探究,但这并不妨碍那些雄心勃勃想要改变世界,抑或是打算割完韭菜就走的团队借此「文化活用」,向外输出它们的价值哲学。他们的立场很决绝,但鲜有做到广纳群言。

    1. Seeing White. Recommended by a reader, this 14-part series on race and whiteness is essential listening.*

      This is also one of the best things I consumed this past year.

  9. Sep 2018
    1. This article uses the recent history of White opioids – the synthetic opiates such as OxyContin® that gained notoriety starting in the 1990s in connection with epidemic prescription medication abuse among White, suburban and rural Americans and Suboxone®

      I have never thought about Opioid addiction being something that is more white then black. I guess that makes sense why Utah has such an issue with it since utah is a majority of white people.

  10. Jul 2018
    1. For all the paranoid American theories of being “red-pilled,” of awakening into a many-tentacled liberal/feminist/Jewish conspiracy, the most corrosive force, the ectoplasm infusing itself invisibly through media and culture and politics, is white supremacy.
    2. listen, don’t center yourself, get educated, think about your responses and what role they play
    3. DiAngelo sets aside a whole chapter for the self-indulgent tears of white women, so distraught at the country’s legacy of racist terrorism that they force people of color to drink from the firehose of their feelings about it.
    4. “The most effective adaptation of racism over time,” DiAngelo claims, “is the idea that racism is conscious bias held by mean people.” This “good/bad binary,” positing a world of evil racists and compassionate non-racists, is itself a racist construct, eliding systemic injustice and imbuing racism with such shattering moral meaning that white people, especially progressives, cannot bear to face their collusion in it. (Pause on that, white reader. You may have subconsciously developed your strong negative feelings about racism in order to escape having to help dismantle it.)
    5. In DiAngelo’s almost epidemiological vision of white racism, our minds and bodies play host to a pathogen that seeks to replicate itself, sickening us in the process. Like a mutating virus, racism shape-shifts in order to stay alive; when its explicit expression becomes taboo, it hides in coded language.
    6. DiAngelo addresses her book mostly to white people, and she reserves her harshest criticism for white liberals like herself (and like me), whom she sees as refusing to acknowledge their own participation in racist systems. “I believe,” she writes, “that white progressives cause the most daily damage to people of color.” Not only do these people fail to see their complicity, but they take a self-serving approach to ongoing anti-racism efforts: “To the degree that white progressives think we have arrived, we will put our energy into making sure that others see us as having arrived.”
    7. And the expectation of “white solidarity”—white people will forbear from correcting each other’s racial missteps, to preserve the peace—makes genuine allyship elusive. White fragility holds racism in place.
    8. DiAngelo attempts to explicate the phenomenon of white people’s paper-thin skin. She argues that our largely segregated society is set up to insulate whites from racial discomfort, so that they fall to pieces at the first application of stress—such as, for instance, when someone suggests that “flesh-toned” may not be an appropriate name for a beige crayon. Unused to unpleasantness (more than unused to it—racial hierarchies tell white people that they are entitled to peace and deference), they lack the “racial stamina” to engage in difficult conversations. This leads them to respond to “racial triggers”—the show “Dear White People,” the term “wypipo”—with “emotions such as anger, fear and guilt,” DiAngelo writes, “and behaviors such as argumentation, silence, and withdrawal from the stress-inducing situation.”
    9. In more than twenty years of running diversity-training and cultural-competency workshops for American companies, the academic and educator Robin DiAngelo has noticed that white people are sensationally, histrionically bad at discussing racism. Like waves on sand, their reactions form predictable patterns: they will insist that they “were taught to treat everyone the same,” that they are “color-blind,” that they “don’t care if you are pink, purple, or polka-dotted.” They will point to friends and family members of color, a history of civil-rights activism, or a more “salient” issue, such as class or gender. They will shout and bluster. They will cry. In 2011, DiAngelo coined the term “white fragility” to describe the disbelieving defensiveness that white people exhibit when their ideas about race and racism are challenged—and particularly when they feel implicated in white supremacy. Why, she wondered, did her feedback prompt such resistance, as if the mention of racism were more offensive than the fact or practice of it?
  11. Apr 2018
    1. Her words reveal the conflict between allegiance to hercultural background and her adopted culture.

      conflict between both of her cultures. her cultural background is one of patrice lumbaba who was killed. meaning her only identity were two european royaltyis and a horribly alteres portrayal, embodiment of Jesus

    2. FindingGod’s strength within was the emotional and spiritualfoundation and the necessary antecedent of “regaining mycomposure.”

      this is good and all but I dont think she found strength in God. it might've been the opposite. closer reading needed

      Sarah's relationship with God has been completely skewed. Her mother urged herfather to be "jesus" a savior to the black race. he was supposed to heal the misery of the black man, but instead he ended up wanting to escape his blackness.

      Her foundation of christ is just as broken as her foundation in her father. by her line "I always belived my father to be God" it means that she used to have faith in him. used to have faith in him as a black man like her mother did. but when he went off and married a white woman she lost her ability to have faith in anything.

      to her, her father marrying a white woman would be like jesus endorsing the anti-christ. it is absolutely blasphemous in chrisitan belief and would challenge the entire lifestyle and existance of a christians religious identity.

    3. n fact, some women preferred a Whitetherapist, feeling that would ensure that their private sufferingwould remain private in their closely-knit West Indiancommunity, and would provide an “outside” perspective

      This preferance for white women therapists in this exact respect can actually be harmdul. because a white woman is not truly what she needs to talk to. also sarah has been looking for solace in a white people, she doesn't need an outside perspective, what she needs is someone who actually understands her.

      this reaching for white people is what caused her confusion in the first place. Her desire for whiteness while being black- or rather her refusal to ackowledge the power/strength/beauty of her blackness is what kills her.

      At once she states that she bludgeoned her father with a black mask/head. this is a metaphor that she was so hurt that her father chose the white life that she'd rather have him die as a black beast than to see him live as black man married to a white woman. so she killed him in an ugly portrayal of blackness- to justify her desire to be affiliated with white people. She doesn't want to claim her father or ackowledge her hypocrisy.

      In fact, we can read her boyfriend as her therapist. he's white, jewish, and seems to find amusement in her lies, hatred, and body. this amusement of problems is because he's so far detached from the situation he can't provide any empathy and understanding to her actions and much less read into her obvious cries for help.

      read more into the need for black ppl to see black therapists*

  12. Mar 2018
    1. It is to explore thesocial processes that often depict Black women as liberated from tradi-tional white norms of femininity while such women continue to experi-ence poverty, violence, and illness at rates that exceed those of theirso-called fragile white sisters.

      Sarah clearly states how much she yearns to be like her white counterparts. that could be a peak of her wisdom on who has it easier in te first place.

      she already experiences the poverty, violence and (mental) illness that her blackness has had to offer her. and she doesn't want to be liberated from white feminity she wants to indulge in it. the same way that her father is indulging in the spoils of a white woman and a white lifestyle.

  13. Nov 2017
  14. Oct 2017
    1. The 1st. duty enjoined on them was to enquire & report a site in some convenient & proper part of the state for an University, to be called the “University of Virginia.”In this enquiry they supposed that the governing considerations should be the healthiness of the site, the fertility of the neighbouring country, and it’s centrality to the white population of the whole state:

      When I first ready the report, this duty didn't strike me much, other than that the college would be named the "University of Virginia" to represent the whole state. I felt pride for it until I thought about how location was the first goal, meaning their association with The Grounds for the site be healthy and fertile. This I understood, however, the statement "centrality to the white population of the whole state" bothered me. Later on the report finds that the centrality of white population was the main reason they chose this county over others. I assume it was for easier access for Virginians to attend the school, because only White men were allowed to attend the school until around the 1970s. This is a part of history our school holds that is inevitable, but to see how the University has grown from it is inspiring, however there is more growth to be made.

    2. It was the degree of centrality to the white population of the state which alone then constituted the important point of comparison between these places

      This could be one of the reasons for the recent protests. This says that the commissioners wanted to find a location that was in the center of the white population. This alludes to the fact that the University was made for white people.The protesters feel that they are justified by this because they are going back to what the original commissioners wanted when they made the University.

    3. It was the degree of centrality to the white population of the state which alone then constituted the important point of comparison between these places

      This was really unsettling for me read. Proximity to the most white people is the one criteria that made the difference in where the University's location was chosen. If Charlottesville hadn't been most central to the white population of Virginia, UVa would be located in Lexington or in Staunton. Its definitely not a good thing that our school was centered around pleasing only the white race before our grounds were even built. I can't imagine how different our grounds would be and our university if another place had been more convenient for white people. UVa certainly has a racist past and I think most of us, if not all, are aware of that but I still couldn't believe that such a racist criteria is the reason the school exists where it does today and is the way Uva is today.

      • Becca Meaney
    1. ‘They look like white elephants,’ she said

      A playful line. The girl offers up a side of childlike imagination, describing the rolling white hills in front as if they looked like white elephants.

      This show sot us readers new insight into the character of the girl: that she is imaginative, creative, and is actively thinking. Perhaps she is not simply a follower to the American.

  15. Sep 2017
  16. Jul 2017
  17. Jan 2017
  18. Sep 2016
  19. Jul 2016
  20. Apr 2016
    1. formal invitation

      For a more critical reading of this speech, see this piece from Black Girl Dangerous: "Women have been trying to get men to care about oppression of women since…always."

  21. Mar 2016
    1. THE HILLS ACROSS THE VALLEY OF THE Ebro were long and white. On this side there was no shade and no trees

      If the Hills symbolise the kid, the pregnant tummy or the elephant in the room, then the shadeless landscape infront of them could be a symbolic illustration of a conflictless way of life, avoid of hindrance.

    2. white elephants,

      White symbolizes innocence and pureness, which is often connected with children. The white elephants could therefore symbolize the baby.

    3. On this side there was no shade and no trees

      Could be a symbolic illustration of the girl becoming "barren" post abortion, just like the land is barren.

    4. bead

      a small object often used as part of a piece of jewelry. This could for instance be a string of perles.

    5. junction

      a place where two or more roads or railway lines meet

  22. Aug 2015
    1. But to say so is merely to recount how one particular form of economic inequality came about.

      you cannot fix racial inequality by fixing economic inequality.

  23. Jul 2015
    1. "She sees herself as an activist and instead of standing on the picket line, she's creating beautiful, conceptual pieces that get her message across," Andre Guichard said. "If you don't think, in 2015, that people of other skin colors can have an opinion, that's a sign we need to have further conversation about it."

      The point is that maybe you, as the gallery owners, should have showcased a black artists' work on this theme.

    1. The petition complains that the Confederate flag was removed because it offended black people through its historic association with slavery and white supremacy, and laughably asserts that the African-American Monument, designed by sculptor Ed Dwight, provokes the same outrage for whites.

      white fragility in a nutshell

    1. lose my body

      I'm just trying to imagine how it might make Coates son squirm to have his dad talk to him about his body. I guess I'm squirming a bit too. I'm expecting to hear about racism, but here I'm being asked to think about a body.

  24. Jun 2015
    1. Can't be 100% sure because of the people who have no profile pictures, but fairly certain the Mendeley team here is entirely white males, other than there 3 token women.