11 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2021
    1. By focusing on the condition of the looking glass, Joyce suggests the artist does not start his work with a clean slate. Rather there is considerable baggage he or she must overcome. This baggage might include colonial conditions or biased assumptions. Form and context influence content.

      This seems a bit analogous to Peggy McIntosh's Backpack of White Privilege I was looking at yesterday.

      cf. White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack' and 'Some Notes for Facilitators' | National SEED Project

    1. Some people "get" the idea of systemic privilege and ask "But what can I do?" My answer is, you can use unearned advantage to weaken systems of unearned advantage. I see white privilege as a bank account that I did not ask for, but that I can choose to spend. People with privilege have far more power than we have been taught to realize, within the myth of meritocracy. Participants can brainstorm about how to use unearned assets to share power; these may include time, money, energy, literacy, mobility, leisure, connections, spaces, housing, travel opportunities. Using these assets may lead to key changes in other behaviors as well, such as paying attention, making associations, intervening, speaking up, asserting and deferring, being alert, taking initiative, doing ally and advocacy work, lobbying, campaigning, protesting, organizing, and recognizing and acting against both the external and internalized forms of oppression and privilege.
    2. In my class and place, I did not see myself as a racist because I was taught to recognize racism only in individual acts of meanness by members of my group, never in invisible systems conferring unsought racial dominance on my group from birth.
    3. I repeatedly forgot each of the realizations on this list until I wrote it down. For me, white privilege has turned out to be an elusive and fugitive subject. The pressure to avoid it is great, for in facing it I must give up the myth of meritocracy.

      We need more research and details on the idea of the American myth of meritocracy.

    4. whites are taught to think of their lives as morally neutral, normative, and average, and also ideal, so that when we work to benefit others, this is seen as work which will allow “them” to be more like “us.”
  2. Jun 2020
  3. Nov 2017
    1. She noted that he had struggled with mental illness and an occasionally violent temper.

      oh great. Now they'll blame it on mental illness again.

  4. Aug 2015
    1. But to say so is merely to recount how one particular form of economic inequality came about.

      you cannot fix racial inequality by fixing economic inequality.

  5. Jul 2015
    1. "She sees herself as an activist and instead of standing on the picket line, she's creating beautiful, conceptual pieces that get her message across," Andre Guichard said. "If you don't think, in 2015, that people of other skin colors can have an opinion, that's a sign we need to have further conversation about it."

      The point is that maybe you, as the gallery owners, should have showcased a black artists' work on this theme.

  6. Jun 2015
    1. Can't be 100% sure because of the people who have no profile pictures, but fairly certain the Mendeley team here is entirely white males, other than there 3 token women.