31 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2021
    1. "Although in the United States it is common to use the term multiculturalism to refer to both liberal forms of multiculturalism and to describe critical multicultural pedagogies, in Canada, Great Britain, Australia, and other areas,anti-racism refers to those enactments of multiculturalism grounded in critical theory and pedagogy. The term anti-racism makes a greater distinction, in my opinion, between the liberal and critical paradigms of multiculturalism, and is one of the reasons I find the anti-racism literature useful for analyzing multiculturalism in music education."

  2. May 2021
  3. Apr 2021
  4. Mar 2021
  5. Feb 2021
    1. In my class and place, I did not see myself as a racist because I was taught to recognize racism only in individual acts of meanness by members of my group, never in invisible systems conferring unsought racial dominance on my group from birth.
  6. Jan 2021
    1. Watched

      [[Verna Myers]]: [[How to overcome our biases? Walk boldly toward them]] [[Ted Talk]]

      Our biases can be dangerous, even deadly — as we've seen in the cases of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Eric Garner, in Staten Island, New York. Diversity advocate Verna Myers looks closely at some of the subconscious attitudes we hold toward out-groups. She makes a plea to all people: Acknowledge your biases. Then move toward, not away from, the groups that make you uncomfortable. In a funny, impassioned, important talk, she shows us how.

      "Stare at awesome black people."

      Look for discomfirming data

      "Walk toward your discomfort."

      When you see something, have the courage to say something. ie "We don't say those things anymore."

    1. Ideas for becoming less biased:

      • Get to know black families
      • If religious, join a black church
      • foster conversations that include conversations

      Life-changing magic of hanging out

      Research on white/black roommates in "Interraciial Roomate Relationships" by Natalie J. Shook, Russell H. Fazio in Psychological Science, 2008.

      Reminiscent of the institutionalized racism of Jim Crow at segregating/separating people to prevent understanding.

    1. Asking questions is a powerful tool to seek clarity or offer a new perspective. Below are some suggestions to use in conversations when racist behavior occurs: Seek clarity: “Tell me more about __________.” Offer an alternative perspective: “Have you ever considered __________.” Speak your truth: “I don’t see it the way you do. I see it as __________.” Find common ground: “We don’t agree on __________ but we can agree on __________.” Give yourself the time and space you need: “Could we revisit the conversation about __________ tomorrow.” Set boundaries. “Please do not say __________ again to me or around me.

      An excellent list of questions for framing discussions.

    1. I've seen prior references to Italians, Irish, and others which were considered non-white in the late 1800's and early 1900's and which are now broadly considered white in the late 1900's. Now this seems to indicate something similar for Jews in America.

      I'm curious what lessons could be drawn here for anti-racism?

  7. Jul 2020
  8. Jan 2016
    1. Between these two incidents I have witnessed and heard innumerable reports from Black parents across the nation of similar encounters.  Black students, usually males, being viewed not as potentially gifted, needing enrichment or more academic challenge, but as disrupters and distractions. So-called professional educators not questioning their own weak classroom practices, lack of differentiated instruction, poor preparation, or implicit biases, but instead wanting these non-compliant Black boys drugged into passivity.

      I remember early in my career being teamed with a teacher who allowed Vietnamese students to speak Vietnamese in math class, but wouldn't allow Hispanic students to speak Spanish. She insisted that the Vietnamese students were helping each other with the math while the Hispanic students were off task, even though she spoke neither language and couldn't tell. My eighth grade students told me about her practice and even labelled it as racist. They felt safe to do so because I encouraged them to use peer support and their native languages whenever they felt it would help.

      I spoke up. I pointed out the inequity in her practice to her and when she dismissed my concerns, I spoke to our administrator about the practice, explaining that I thought it was racist and had a negative impact on student engagement and learning.

      This was a challenge for me as a white teacher because I was working in an urban school with a high referral rate and the vast majority of classrooms had white teachers teaching students of color. In this case, because I spoke out, my colleague was asked to change the practice by an administrator. This probably served to add to some ideological friction between she and I. Still, I'd do it again in the same circumstances but my experience was that the system doesn't thank you when you speak out this way. It takes moral courage and a willingness to feel isolated.