9 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. RESULTS: The rate of discontinuation due to side effects was significantly higher in the control group than for the patients (38% versus 0%). The severity of the side effects in the controls increased significantly during treatment with T(4). The side effect scores of the patients were higher than those of the controls prior to T(4) treatment, but did not change significantly during the treatment period. Although the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones rose significantly in both groups, concentrations of fT(3) and fT(4) were significantly higher in the controls.CONCLUSIONS: Healthy controls and depressed patients respond significantly differently to supraphysiological T(4). Healthy controls experience higher elevations of thyroid hormones in response to supraphysiological T(4), thus inducing significantly more side effects and discontinuation.LIMITATIONS: Open-label study; groups were studied at different times; in contrast to healthy controls, depressed patients were also taking antidepressants.

      Brilliant study. Note that the depressed patients had equal thyroid symptoms before taking thyroxine, so experienced no increase. The pre-treatment depressed patients, treated depressed patients, and treated controls all had an equal number of thyroid symptoms. Thus, only the pre-treatment healthy patients lacked hyperthyroid symptoms. This is interesting because the treatment was 500 mcg thyroxine (average 484 mcg), which you'd expect to cause more symptoms.

      This could mean either that the depressed patients had as many symptoms alleviated as they had caused by thyroxine, or that depressed patients simply had lower thyroidergic activity. The latter is supported by the fact that free T3 and free T4 rose 2 or 3 times less in treated depressed patients compared to treated controls (full text).

      It's also possible that the pre-existence of symptoms masked their appearance (in which case increased severity might be expected). I doubt that this is the case. A few symptoms trended toward improvement.

    1. The addition of supraphysiologic doses of L-T4 (300 mcg per day) to an otherwise stable medication regimen of standard treatments resulted in a significant decline in depression scores during the 6-week, double-blind treatment phase. At endpoint (week 6), the mean HamD score showed a group difference of 3.7 points in favor of L-T4. Such difference is generally considered to be clinically meaningful in a short-term treatment trial for major depression. NICE used a 3.0-point difference in HamD change scores as a criterion of clinical significance.27

      This is consistent with the open label data. The dose is also similar. Combining this placebo-controlled trial with the three open-label supraphysiological thyroxine studies that I've seen, that is sufficient for me to conclude efficacy. Namely, Pfeiffer et al (350 mcg), Rudas et al (235 mcg) and Bauer et al (482 mcg)

      I would like to see if this study mentions nonresponders. Those three other studies found roughly a 50% response rate. Thus, the effect size in responders may be twice as significant.

    1. L-thyroxine at an average dose of 350 micro g/die. Outcomes were moderate in 39.3% and very good in 21.5%, corresponding to 21-item HAMD scores of < or =16 and < or =8 and clinical judgement. Of all patients, 39.3% had to stop treatment due to nonresponse or side effects.

      Another study consistent with the 50% remission figue. The dose is also similar, between Rudas et al (235 mcg) and Bauer et al (482 mcg)

    1. RESULTS: Two patients dropped out of the study owing to side effects. The remaining 7 patients received a final mean dose of T4 of 235 +/- 58 micrograms/day (range: 150-300 micrograms/day). Their scores on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale had fallen from a mean of 21.1 +/- 4.1 before inclusion in the study to a mean of 8.0 +/- 2.8 at the end of the 8th week. Five patients were full responders, 1 a partial responder, and 1 a nonresponder.CONCLUSIONS: Augmentation with high-dose T4 proved to have an antidepressant effect in more than 50% of the previously treatment-resistant patients with chronic depression and/or dysthymia.

      Thyroxine working in about 50% of patients was also found in Bauer et al. This dose was not quite as high as Bauer, but 235 mcg is still above a full replacement dose.

      I'd like to see results on minor depression. However, such studies are unlikely.

    1. Thyroxine was added to their antidepressant medication, and the doses were increased to a mean of 482 ± 72 μg/day.

      This is the highest dose of levothyroxine that I've seen administered. Even treatment for thyroid cancer rarely goes beyond 300 mcg (or even 200 mcg, which is more common).

    1. RESULTS: In the hypothyroid state, the plasma volume measured by dilution of 125I-albumin (APV) was higher than the calculated plasma volume (CPV) from packed red cell mass, suggesting an extravascular escape of albumin. After substitutive therapy, the CPV showed a statistical increase (P < 0.05), whereas APV remained unchanged. Both ERPF and GFR increased after thyroxine therapy (p < 0.05). In the subclinical group, blood volumes and renal function were similar to those found in the other group of patients when in the euthyroid state.

      If this holds true, I'd expect rapid blood volume expansion from thyroid hormone. I'm also interested in whether thyroid hormone stimulates the production of albumin, given its anabolic properties.

    1. 22.3 per cent (−10.7; 95% CI, −15.6 to −5.7) in the diet group

      Interesting that the diet group worked better. I'd like to see if it's statistically significantly better than the drug group. It's also worth asking whether sodium was the only important dietary change, or if avoiding sodium caused many other dietary improvements.

    2. Sleepiness and neck circumference were significantly reduced only in the diet group (p = .007 and p < .001 for the time × group interactions, respectively).

      Fascinating. Neck circumference suggests that sodium intake may indeed be the significant dietary factor. The recommended diet wasn't even very restricted in sodium.

  2. Dec 2019
    1. The sodium-restricted diet group received a regimen aiming a maximum intake of 3 g of sodium per day (equivalent to 7.5 g of sodium chloride).

      That sounds incredibly high to me. 3000 mg is the absolute maximum intake that could ever be considered 'low' sodium. Under 1500 is usually considered ideal. Would, then, a diet aiming for half the sodium be twice as effective?