7 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2020
    1. 22.3 per cent (−10.7; 95% CI, −15.6 to −5.7) in the diet group

      Interesting that the diet group worked better. I'd like to see if it's statistically significantly better than the drug group. It's also worth asking whether sodium was the only important dietary change, or if avoiding sodium caused many other dietary improvements.

    2. Sleepiness and neck circumference were significantly reduced only in the diet group (p = .007 and p < .001 for the time × group interactions, respectively).

      Fascinating. Neck circumference suggests that sodium intake may indeed be the significant dietary factor. The recommended diet wasn't even very restricted in sodium.

  2. Dec 2019
    1. The sodium-restricted diet group received a regimen aiming a maximum intake of 3 g of sodium per day (equivalent to 7.5 g of sodium chloride).

      That sounds incredibly high to me. 3000 mg is the absolute maximum intake that could ever be considered 'low' sodium. Under 1500 is usually considered ideal. Would, then, a diet aiming for half the sodium be twice as effective?

  3. Jan 2019
    1. ConclusionsThese findings suggest that in patients with HF, sodium intake plays a role in the pathogenesis of SA.

      The question remains, then, for the general population with SA.

    1. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that pharyngeal edema contributes to sleep-disordered breathing in obese patients with severe OSA, hypertension, and diastolic heart failure. Upper airway edema may contribute to the frequent occurrence of OSA in patients with heart disease.

      I suspect it also plays a role in UARS. This study probably selected people with heart failure because the fluid retention leads to a more dramatic response. Hypertension was likely a neccesary ethical consideration. Hypotension is common in UARS; therefore, one is unlikely to find a study administering diuretics to UARS patients. That leaves correlation as the only tool available to confirm this suspicion.

    1. 50 mg naltrexone at bed-time.

      Interesting. Conventional doses of naltrexone appear effective for sleep apnea. I'll be interested in seeing if LDN fairs well.

  4. Oct 2018
    1. Low BP was more prevalent in subjects with upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) (23%) than in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) (0.06%), parasomnia (0.7%), restless leg syndrome (0.9%), or psychological insomnia (0.9%).

      That's an extremely high rate of hypotension in UARS. This may be what I have. If UARS causes hypotension, then sleep apnea (SA) may be different because of its link to obesity.