15 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2018
    1. Right now, they estimate the global taxi market is worth $108 billion, which is triple the size of the $36-billion ride-hailing market. At the same time, they calculate an average of 15 million ride-hailing trips a day globally, which they expect to increase to 97 million by 2030.
  2. Jul 2017
    1. Most proposals (148) were for a new study and publication, with confirmation of original studies’ results (3) being quite uncommon.

      This is a very important statistic to quote, because people always assume the negative use case, i.e., "weaponizing data". I think that does happen, but the more we can gather the statistics, the better we are able to address it.

  3. Jun 2017
    1. t’s noteworthy that 174 of the 177 proposals submitted did not involve reanalysis of original results or disproving of the findings of the original analyses; the bulk of the proposals were for new research. Thus, sponsors’ fears regarding making these data available have not been realized.

      Good statistic to have

  4. Sep 2015
    1. This is problematic because the article has been influential in the literature supporting the use of antidepressants in adolescents.

      Example of the type of harm that lack of transparency can lead to.

    2. Access to primary data from trials has important implications for both clinical practice and research, including that published conclusions about efficacy and safety should not be read as authoritative. The reanalysis of Study 329 illustrates the necessity of making primary trial data and protocols available to increase the rigour of the evidence base.

      How can anyone argue that science isn't served by making primary data available? We must recognize that more people are harmed by not sharing data than are harmed by data being shared.

  5. Apr 2015
    1. There is now a strong body of evidence showing failure to comply with results-reporting requirements across intervention classes, even in the case of large, randomised trials [3–7]. This applies to both industry and investigator-driven trials. I

      Compliance not mechanism

    2. “the registration of all interventional trials is a scientific, ethical, and moral responsibility”

      World Health Organization's statement

    1. Anyone withholding the methods and results of a clinical trial is already in breach of multiple codes and regulations, including the Declaration of Helsinki, various promises from industry and professional bodies, and, in many cases, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendment Act of 2007. Indeed, a recently published cohort study of trials in clinicaltrials.gov found that more than half had failed to post results; and even though the FDA is entitled to issue fines of $10,000 a day for transgressions, no such fines have ever been levied [3].

      Sticks don't work if they aren't used. I find this rather disturbing.

    2. The best currently available evidence shows that the methods and results of clinical trials are routinely withheld from doctors, researchers, and patients [2–5], undermining our best efforts at informed decision making.
    1. This week there was an amazing landmark announcement from the World Health Organisation: they have come out and said that everyone must share the results of their clinical trials, within 12 months of completion, including old trials (since those are the trials conducted on currently used treatments).
  6. Dec 2014
  7. Jan 2014
    1. Reasons for not making data electronically available. Regarding their attitudes towards data sharing, most of the respondents (85%) are interested in using other researchers' datasets, if those datasets are easily accessible. Of course, since only half of the respondents report that they make some of their data available to others and only about a third of them (36%) report their data is easily accessible, there is a major gap evident between desire and current possibility. Seventy-eight percent of the respondents said they are willing to place at least some their data into a central data repository with no restrictions. Data repositories need to make accommodations for varying levels of security or access restrictions. When asked whether they were willing to place all of their data into a central data repository with no restrictions, 41% of the respondents were not willing to place all of their data. Nearly two thirds of the respondents (65%) reported that they would be more likely to make their data available if they could place conditions on access. Less than half (45%) of the respondents are satisfied with their ability to integrate data from disparate sources to address research questions, yet 81% of them are willing to share data across a broad group of researchers who use data in different ways. Along with the ability to place some restrictions on sharing for some of their data, the most important condition for sharing their data is to receive proper citation credit when others use their data. For 92% of the respondents, it is important that their data are cited when used by other researchers. Eighty-six percent of survey respondents also noted that it is appropriate to create new datasets from shared data. Most likely, this response relates directly to the overwhelming response for citing other researchers' data. The breakdown of this section is presented in Table 13.

      Categories of data sharing considered:

      • I would use other researchers' datasets if their datasets were easily accessible.
      • I would be willing to place at least some of my data into a central data repository with no restrictions.
      • I would be willing to place all of my data into a central data repository with no restrictions.
      • I would be more likely to make my data available if I could place conditions on access.
      • I am satisfied with my ability to integrate data from disparate sources to address research questions.
      • I would be willing to share data across a broad group of researchers who use data in different ways.
      • It is important that my data are cited when used by other researchers.
      • It is appropriate to create new datasets from shared data.
    2. Data sharing practices. Only about a third (36%) of the respondents agree that others can access their data easily, although three-quarters share their data with others (see Table 11). This shows there is a willingness to share data, but it is difficult to achieve or is done only on request.

      There is a willingness, but not a way!

    3. Nearly one third of the respondents chose not to answer whether they make their data available to others. Of those who did respond, 46% reported they do not make their data electronically available to others. Almost as many reported that at least some of their data are available somehow, either on their organization's website, their own website, a national network, a global network, a personal website, or other (see Table 10). The high percentage of non-respondents to this question most likely indicates that data sharing is even lower than the numbers indicate. Furthermore, the less than 6% of scientists who are making “All” of their data available via some mechanism, tends to re-enforce the lack of data sharing within the communities surveyed.
    1. Journals and sponsors want you to share your data

      What is the sharing standard? What are the consequences of not sharing? What is the enforcement mechanism?

      There are three primary sharing mechanisms I can think of today: email, usb stick, and dropbox (née ftp).

      The dropbox option is supplanting ftp which comes from another era, but still satisfies an important niche for larger data sets and/or higher-volume or anonymous traffic.

      Dropbox, email and usb are all easily accessible parts of the day-to-day consumer workflow; they are all trivial to set up without institutional support or, importantly, permission.

      An email account is already provisioned by default for everyone or, if the institutional email offerings are not sufficient, a person may easily set up a 3rd-party email account with no permission or hassle.

      Data management alternatives to these three options will have slow or no adoption until the barriers to access and use are as low as email; the cost of entry needs to be no more than *a web browser, an email address, and no special permission required".