32 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jun 2021
  3. May 2021
    1. A relatively comprehensive view of Wouter Groeneveld's commonplacing workflow. There are a few bits missing here and there, but he's got most of the bigger basics down that a majority of people seem to have found and discovered.

      He's got a strong concept of indexing, search, and even some review, which many miss. There's some organic work toward combinatorial thought, but only via the search piece.

      I should make a list of the important pieces for more advanced versions to have. I've yet to see any articles or work on this.

  4. Mar 2021
    1. Sëriñ boobu aj na daaw, doomam a ko wuutu léegi.

      Ce marabout est décédé l'an dernier, c'est son fils qui le remplace maintenant.

      sëriñ bi -- marabout.

      boobu -- this.

      aj (Arabic: Hajj) v. -- make the pilgrimage to Mecca. 🕋; deceased ☠️ (for a religious personality).

      na -- he (?).

      daaw n. -- last year. 🗓

      doom+am (doom) ji -- child by descent 👶🏽; doll🪆; to have a child.

  5. Feb 2021
  6. Dec 2020
    1. I like the idea of a word for the year and have seen others like Mark Aaron Davis do this in the past.

      It's apparently a broader thing as I've seen many people posting about receiving their Theme System Journals from @cortexpodcast on Twitter over the past week. They've cleverly set aside the letters ME in some of their marketing like so: THEME System Journal

      I'm not sure if I'll choose a theme in this way specifically, but I think I'm going to choose a theme to help direct some of my reading though. I'm going to try to focus more on the idea of anthropology when I make reading choices.

  7. Oct 2020
    1. And so The Year of Intentional Internet began.

      After reading just a few posts by Desiree Zamora Garcia, I'd like to nominate her to give a keynote at the upcoming IndieWeb Summit in June. I totally want to hear her give a talk with the title Year of Intentional Internet.

  8. Nov 2019
  9. Jan 2019
    1. first-year writing

      https://secure.ncte.org/store/strategies-for-teaching-1st-year-comp This book has great articles on first-year writing courses, but I'm specifically pointing to one entitled "An Honors Course in First-Year Composition: Classical Rhetoric and Contemporary Writing" By Marvin Diogenes, Stanford University.

  10. Nov 2018
    1. “My first exposure to hospital medicine was through Drs. Chris Landrigan and Vinny Chiang as an intern in Boston. I was impressed by their clinical mastery and teaching. I then did my first research project with Chris, which led to a publication in Pediatrics. I had previously thought about intensive care or emergency medicine for fellowship, but I was excited about the general nature, growth opportunity, and ability to drive health system change in hospital medicine. I think that growth and ability to drive health system change in hospital medicine has grown exponentially since I finished residency, so the field has more than lived up to its potential and has more room to grow in terms of impact.”

      Patrick Conway

    2. “I’ve been continually surprised at the growth of the field and SHM. My view has evolved from ‘Is this for real?’ to ‘How can hospital medicine make healthcare better for patients on a broad scale?’ The latter view has gone through iterations. We witnessed HM make hospitals more efficient, then we saw hospitalists drive safer, less harmful care. Most recently, hospitalists are embarking on deep change through alternative payment models like bundled payments. In terms of SHM, we endeavored to keep a ‘big tent’ since the many flavors of hospitalists all are united by a deep conviction to make hospitals safer, kinder, and higher-functioning places for the people inhabiting them—patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals. I’m humbled and gratified that we have been able to keep SHM a viable home for all hospitalists after 20 years.”

      Win Whitcomb

    3. “I think the future of hospitalists is actually outside of the hospital and helping to keep patients healthy. Hospitalists are really good at taking care of the most sick, complex patients who are at the highest risk of healthcare utilization. While hospitalists predominantly do this for patients in the hospital, hospitalists are starting to play a larger role in post-acute care and trying to target interventions to improve health for high-risk patients. Not surprisingly, we are starting to see extensivist models, including Comprehensive Care Physicians, grow out of existing hospitalist groups.”

      Vineet Arora

    4. “As I was finishing my residency in the mid 1990s, I told folks I wanted to find a job ‘only doing inpatient medicine.’ People laughed at me. Within five years, hospitalist medicine was developing on the East Coast, and people were no longer laughing. … Hospitalists will be at the center of this brave new world [of episodic care] since they assist in the liaising between patient, PCP, specialist, and acute-care provider. It is incumbent upon us to help explain things in a manner easily understood by the patient and to be committed to high-quality care with an eye for value and cost containment.”

      Jill Slater Waldman

    5. “The hospitalist movement has been a remarkable success. I heard of it from my friend Bob Wachter and since then have learned much from him and many others. … Hospitalists have and will continue to play a key role in improving patient safety, quality, patient experience, value, and healthcare equity. SHM has taken a leadership role to help ensure hospitalists have the skills and resources to do this.”

      Peter Pronovost

    6. “The emergence of the field of hospital medicine has been one of the most important developments for quality of care in hospitals over the past 20 years. Taking full advantage of this opportunity will require the field to broaden its focus from one that primarily emphasizes the care of patients while they are hospitalized to one that encompasses patients’ full trajectories through the continuum of care. To realize their full potential as quality improvement leaders, hospitalists will need to position themselves as experts in health system quality and safety. Specifically, they will need to take ownership of the vital processes of effectively communicating across transitions of care.”

      Mark Chassin

  11. Feb 2018
  12. May 2017
    1. economic planning regions

      The Soviet Union’s economy was one that was planned by leaders in the Party. The Gosplan was the agency that was responsible for the central economic planning in the Soviet Union. It was established in 1921 and did not have a large role at first. However, after the October Revolution and Russian Civil War, a large period of economic collapse occurred and a planned economy was necessary to stimulate the economy, increase productivity, and distribute necessary commodities. The Gosplan’s main task was to create and administer a series of 5-year plans that governed the economy of the USSR. The committee was disbanded in 1991 at the dissolution of the Soviet Union.

      Faulhaber, Gerald R., and David J. Farber. "Spectrum management: Property rights, markets, and the commons." Rethinking rights and regulations: institutional responses to new communication technologies (2003): 193-206.

  13. Feb 2017
  14. Jan 2014
    1. An effective data management program would enable a user 20 years or longer in the future to discover , access , understand, and use particular data [ 3 ]. This primer summarizes the elements of a data management program that would satisfy this 20-year rule and are necessary to prevent data entropy .

      Who cares most about the 20-year rule? This is an ideal that appeals to some, but in practice even the most zealous adherents can't picture what this looks like in some concrete way-- except in the most traditional ways: physical paper journals in libraries are tangible examples of the 20-year rule.

      Until we have a digital equivalent for data I don't blame people looking for tenure or jobs for not caring about this ideal if we can't provide a clear picture of how to achieve this widely at an institutional level. For digital materials I think the picture people have in their minds is of tape backup. Maybe this is generational? New generations not exposed widely to cassette tapes, DVDs, and other physical media that "old people" remember, only then will it be possible to have a new ideal that people can see in their minds-eye.