3 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. In 1780, two years after Linnaeus’s death, Vienna’s Court Library introduced a card catalog, the first of its kind. Describing all the books on the library’s shelves in one ordered system, it relied on a simple, flexible tool: paper slips. Around the same time that the library catalog appeared, says Krajewski, Europeans adopted banknotes as a universal medium of exchange. He believes this wasn’t a historical coincidence. Banknotes, like bibliographical slips of paper and the books they referred to, were material, representational, and mobile. Perhaps Linnaeus took the same mental leap from “free-floating banknotes” to “little paper slips” (or vice versa).

      I've read about the Vienna Court Library and their card catalogue. Perhaps worth reading Krajewski for more specifics to link these things together?

      Worth exploring the idea of paper money as a source of inspiration here too.

  2. May 2021
    1. Humanists had the tools and even the concepts to invent the cross-referenced thematic library catalogue, but they did not do so. We do not know why it took several hundred years and the Italian director of the British Museum, Antonio Panizzi, to create a truly modern reference catalogue through his “Ninety-One Cataloguing Rules” in 1841.

      Origin of the modern reference catalogue...

    2. The great library of Alexandria, which began around 300 B.C.E., created a cataloguing system called Pinakes to manage the estimated 500,000 books in the collection of the Ptolemaic pharaohs. The Pinakes were sophisticated bibliographical lists containing title, incipit (the first few lines of each text), the number of lines for each work, and a subject and author index.

      Pinakes!