8 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
    1. nt. Time is now currency: it is not passed but spe

      Time is now currency: it is not passed but spent.

      Some of this essay shows the change in conceptualization of time and its use. Identifying it as currency certainly happened over time.

      What else might we equate with time besides money? Happiness instead? Measure it in leisure instead of solely by capitalism?

  2. Jun 2021
    1. A Harvard Business Review survey found that 62 percent of high-earning individuals work over 50 hours a week, more than a third work over 60 hours a week, and one in 10 work over 80 hours a week. According to Markovits, elites today work an average of 12 more hours per week than middle-class workers (the equivalent of 1.5 additional workdays).

      This may be the case for high-earners, but where do these people sit with respect to the higher elite or "leisure class"?

      Are these hard working high-earners a new class of people that has emerged that aren't the previous elite of the mid-1900s?

      What effect does the rise of finacialization (versus manufacturing or service sectors) since the 1970's have on this shift? Did these high-earners arise out of a hole in the market to service the elites on the highest rung up to make their wealth grow faster?

      There seems to be a hole in this argument with respect to the prior quote:

      Fifty, 60, 70 years ago, you could tell how poor somebody was by how hard they worked. Today, that relationship has been completely reversed. Elites work for a living. They work harder than they used to. They work harder in terms of brute hours than the middle class on average, and they get most of their income by working.

  3. Aug 2020
  4. Feb 2020
  5. Sep 2019
    1. \7herethere is leisure for fiction, there is little grief.

      This quote jumped out at me. Basically, if you have enough free time that you can spend it on something like writing, how hard can your life really be?

  6. May 2016
  7. annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net annotatingausten.sfsuenglishdh.net
    1. wild–fowl

      "A wild bird, or (usually) wild birds collectively; chiefly applied to those caught for food, game birds (now esp. of the duck and goose kinds)" (OED).