19 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2020
    1. Most web browsers are set by default to protect your privacy unless you opt for tracking yourself. For example, Internet Explorer automatically enables its “Do Not Track” option and Google Chrome blocks any 3rd-party cookies by default.
    1. Alarmingly, Google now deploys hidden trackers on 76% of websites across the web to monitor your behavior and Facebook has hidden trackers on about 25% of websites, according to the Princeton Web Transparency & Accountability Project. It is likely that Google and/or Facebook are watching you on most sites you visit, in addition to tracking you when using their products.
  2. Apr 2020
  3. Mar 2020
    1. You can also turn off personalization for your browser by installing the Interest-Based Ads Opt Out extension.
    2. Google is one of many ad networks that personalizes ads based on your activity online. Go to AdChoices to control ads from other ad networks.
    3. Uncheck the box next to "Also use your activity & information from Google services to personalize ads on websites and apps that partner with Google to show ads."
    1. It wouldn’t mean an end to being able to target ads online. Contextual targeting doesn’t require personal data — and has been used successfully by the likes of non-tracking search engine DuckDuckGo for years (and profitably so). It would just mean an end to the really creepy, stalkerish stuff. The stuff consumers hate — which also serves up horribly damaging societal effects, given that the mass profiling of internet users enables push-button discrimination and exploitation of the vulnerable at vast scale.
    1. And if people were really cool about sharing their personal and private information with anyone, and totally fine about being tracked everywhere they go and having a record kept of all the people they know and have relationships with, why would the ad tech industry need to spy on them in the first place? They could just ask up front for all your passwords.
    2. From an ad tech perspective, the concern is that manipulation doesn’t work when it’s obvious. And the goal of targeted advertising is to manipulate people’s decisions based on intelligence about them gleaned via clandestine surveillance of their online activity (so inferring who they are via their data). This might be a purchase decision. Equally it might be a vote.
    1. It is required by the GDPR as you must document cookies and online tracking at anytime and you must be able to show that documentation to both your users and the EU.
    1. there are third-party cookies, such as those placed by advertisers to see what you’re interested in and in turn serve you ads — even when you leave the original site you visited. (This is how ads follow you around the internet.)