17 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2018
    1. most importantly, however, when the group has real synergy, it will by far exceed the best individual performance. Synergy is best thought of as members of the same team feeding off one another in positive ways; as result the "whole" becomes better than "the sum of the parts". Collaboration can actually raise the "group IQ" – i.e. the sum total of the best talents of each member on the team.

      Synergy.

    1. In effective collaboration, all people involved use their emotional intelligence well to balance emotional needs with their thinking, build authentic relationships and make good quality decisions on behalf of the organisation. Whether working with others one-to-one, in small groups or large teams, there is exemplary communication with empathy that engages hearts and minds.  This occurs at all levels of the organisation.

      How emotional intelligence affects collaboration.

    1. t turns out emotional intelligence in a group setting accelerates the group's development. Team members need EI on an individual level. And when we work together with EI, it's fascinating to see what happens. Studies are finding that collaboration among those with high emotional intelligence creates outcomes that exceed the sum of their individual talents. Shared emotional intelligence not only improves work processes, it improves the work product!

      Emotional intelligence helps increase collaboration.

    1. Our Sample Professional Development (PD) Activity Collection is designed to serve as a resource to PD providers creating training events both for practicing educators and beginning teachers engaged in induction experiences. In this collection, users will find examples of the ways in which information about evidence-based practices,

      The page has a template, activities, and resources instructors can use to help create professional development courses. Rating: 4/5

    1. Teachers often attend professional development that does not pertain to them and what they do. This article looks into various adult learning theories that can be implemented to make professional development more meaningful for the teachers. These learning theories are action learning, experiential learning, project based learning, and self-directed learning. The article recommends blending the different adult learning theories to create a professional development teachers will find relevant to them. The article also states leadership helps direct the relevance of the professional development. Different leadership styles are highlighted and how it helps improve professional development. Rating: 5/5

  2. teacherlink.ed.usu.edu teacherlink.ed.usu.edu
    1. This article looks at several adult learning theories. The theories are: age and stage, cognitive development, and functional, Age and stage theory sates that a learner's age and stage of development plays a part in they way they learn. Cognitive development is when learning goes from concrete to more abstract and learning is intrinsic. Functional theory is when learning problem centered and self directed. Rating: 5/5

    1. In addition to discussing Knowles Andragogy learning theory this article also looks into two other adult learning theories: experiential and transformational. For learning to be successful in adults instructional designers need to "tap into prior experiences," "create a-ha moments," and "create meaning" by connecting to reality. Rating: 5/5

    1. In this case study the instructional designers used a contextualized model of active learning to provide professional learning to teachers in urban alternative high schools. The teachers were given reading assignments, activities that were relevant and engaging to them, and time to reflect at the end of the session. The participants enjoyed the "learner-centered" model of professional development and found it effective and worth to their learning. Rating: 4/5

    1. This article looks into the different ways technology can be incorporated into adult learning. These methods include technology as curriculum, technology as delivery mechanism, technology as complement to instruction, and technology as an instructional tool. The benefits and limitations of each method is also discussed. Rating: 4/5

  3. www.ijbhtnet.com www.ijbhtnet.com
    1. This article highlights how the constructive teaching model can be used to incorporate technology in learning. To do this learning has to be meaningful to the students and should allow for student discourse to compare ideas and modify if necessary. Rating: 4/5

    1. This article documents how Ohio State University trains new elementary and middle school teachers to incorporate technology into their lessons. It highlights that technology integration is a tool not a theory or education. It also states that technology integration should be used to enhance the students' learning instead of forcing it into the curriculum. Rating: 5/5

    1. While this article does not deal with technology in adult education, it does discuss several elements needed to make professional development for educators more meaningful. This helps find the learning valuable thereby creating opportunity for them to implement strategies and techniques learned into their own teaching. Rating: 5/5

    1. This article has several resources teachers can use to incorporate technology into their lessons. It also gives ideas on how to become more proficient with adding technology to the classroom and what to do if the technology enhanced lesson fails. Ratings: 4/5

    1. This article gives us seven tips on how to create a successful learning environment for adults. The takeaway from this article is that adults understand who they are. They are intrinsically motivated and want their learning to be purposeful. Ratings: 4/5

    1. This article discusses the main points of Malcolm Knowles main ideas of adult learning. It also mentions the different styles of learning. Additionally. the ADDIE instructional model is described. I properly constructed the ADDIE model helps merge and implement the different learning styles and needs of the adult learner. Ratings: 3/5