12 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2018
    1. Approaches in the use of assistive technology in inclusive education focus on using technologyto train or rehearse, and to assist and enable learning

      This chapter presents a list of assistive technology applications that supports the students with disabilities in classroom learning in several categories such as reading, writing, math, and computer access.

      Rating: 8/10

  2. May 2018
    1. “High” Tech Strategies

      And the inevitable high tech options that can be out of reach for a lot of families and school districts. The IEP requires, if it is agreed upon by the committee, that the school does everything possible within reason to get the device.

    2. These strategies involve some type of battery operated device such as a tape-recorder, that enhance specific skill areas. Most devices in this category refer to Voice Output Communication Aids (VOCAs

      The next level of tech that includes battery operated devices. With growing inclusion of smart devices in classrooms, I could see this being an easily accessible option for a lot of students. Apps and programs are often easily purchasable and accessible.

    3. Assistive Technology for children with Autism and Aspergers

      This article caught my eye with the categories of assistive technology it presents. It displays low tech, mid tech, and high tech options. This can be crucial to not only finding which is appropriate for non verbal ASD students, but what is also within economic and accessible boundaries.

    4. dry erase board, a photograph, clipboards

      Low tech options include everyday material that you can find in everyday classrooms. Easily accessible and easily used.

    1. defining what exactly is meant by "non-verbal." For instance, some individuals have spoken words, but do not use them functionally, while others may have little spoken language but are able to use it to communicate their needs. The first day of the meeting was focused on developing a description

      Interesting note here. Defining what it means to be non verbal and determining the degree to which one is non verbal. Each individual are a separate case by case instance that can make results vary.

    2. "We still know very little about the cognitive capabilities of nonverbal people with autism, and how best to help them learn to communicate,"

      ASD is a relatively new disorder without a lot of research behind it, leading to a lack of information of how to best help this group of people.

    3. It is estimated that as many as 25 percent of individuals living with autism spectrum disorders are non-verbal.

      This is a large portion of ASD, not including those that are limitedly verbal that could also use assistive technology.

    1. “People with autism bring strengths that we need at Microsoft,” she said, adding that “some have amazing ability to retain information, think at a level of detail and depth, or excel in math or code.”

      I like how this article shines light on how assistive technology can aid the transition for ASD people to have success in the real world. Microsoft here invests in ASD people and they are able to exhibit their strengths in the work place and with the abilities show in this text.

    2. She further explains that even a grocery store or movie theater can be filled with distractions and triggers that will continue to elicit autistic behaviors,

      The need for assistive technology goes beyond the classroom as seen here. IEP research that I have done indicates that students who require assistive technology through the school can request for the service to be taken home as well. This decision is made in the ARD meeting and can be discussed as an option.

    3. Visual Scene Displays — a type of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) — that give detailed context to common situations. She cited an app called Scene Speak, as well as more dynamic ones like TouchChat, Look2Learn and Tobii Sono Flex. The latter programs turn symbols into speech, allowing less-verbal children a better way to communicate.

      Some direct examples of apps that are being used as assistive technology for students who are non verbal. The app is a medium between the students and to those whom they are trying to communicate with. It taps emphasis into visual skills to compensate for verbal deficiencies. A growing trend in schools as this article advocates.