22 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Hundreds of years ago, famed mathematician Blaise Pascal said, “People are generally better persuaded by the reasons which they have themselves discovered than by those which have come into the mind of others.” And the latest science is showing he was pretty much on the money. Change happens when people talk themselves into change. You trying to do it is often counterproductive.

      How does this relate to mindset?

  2. Sep 2022
    1. Organizations don’t change—people do Many companies move quickly from setting their performance objectives to implementing a suite of change initiatives. Be it a new growth strategy or business-unit structure, the integration of a recent acquisition or the rollout of a new operational-improvement effort, such organizations focus on altering systems and structures and on creating new policies and processes. To achieve collective change over time, actions like these are necessary but seldom sufficient. A new strategy will fall short of its potential if it fails to address the underlying mind-sets and capabilities of the people who will execute it. McKinsey research and client experience suggest that half of all efforts to transform organizational performance fail either because senior managers don’t act as role models for change or because people in the organization defend the status quo.2 2. For more on McKinsey’s organizational-health index and findings on organizational change, see Scott Keller and Colin Price, “Organizational health: The ultimate competitive advantage,” McKinsey Quarterly, June 2011. In other words, despite the stated change goals, people on the ground tend to behave as they did before. Equally, the same McKinsey research indicates that if companies can identify and address pervasive mind-sets at the outset, they are four times more likely to succeed in organizational-change efforts than are companies that overlook this stage.

      Mindset drives Behavior, and Behavior drives Results.

      We generally focus on behavior, not mindset. We want to get to results, and fast, so we focus on the changing the behaviors necessary to achieve our desired results. We don't see the need to change ourselves, nor do we want to.

    1. The list is compiled each year by the Marist Mindset team of Professor Tommy Zurhellen, Associate Professor of English; Dr. Vanessa Lynn, Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice; and Dr. Joyce Yu-Jean Lee, Assistant Professor of Art and Digital Media.
  3. Feb 2022
    1. Dweck shows convincingly thatthe most reliable predictor for long-term success is having a “growthmindset.” To actively seek and welcome feedback, be it positive ornegative, is one of the most important factors for success (andhappiness) in the long run. Conversely, nothing is a bigger hindranceto personal growth than having a “fixed mindset.” Those who fearand avoid feedback because it might damage their cherishedpositive self-image might feel better in the short term, but will quicklyfall behind in actual performance (Dweck 2006; 2013).

      Carol Dweck shows that the most reliable predictor for long-term success is what she calls having a "growth mindset" or the ability to take feedback and change.


      This seems related to the idea of endergonic reactions and the growth of complexity as well as the idea of the meaning of life.

      What do these systems all have in common? What are their differences? What abstractions can we make from them?

      Relate this to https://hypothes.is/a/pdWppIX5EeyhR0NR19OjCQ

  4. Jan 2022
    1. What is End User Computing (EUC)? Thanks to the progressive introduction of DevOps, attention to the role of the end user in software development and testing has increased significantly. It is now important to think like an end user when we develop and test software. After all, that's what we're all doing it for.

      What is End User Computing (EUC)? Thanks to the progressive introduction of DevOps, attention to the role of the end user in software development and testing has increased significantly. It is now important to think like an end user when we develop and test software. After all, that's what we're all doing it for.

  5. Dec 2021
    1. In her book Meaning in Life and Why it Matters (2010), the US philosopher Susan Wolf has argued, against Taylor, that even if Sisyphus is feeling fulfilled, owing to the nature of the activity in which he is engaged, his feeling fulfilled is not reasonable. She argues that the object of an agent’s feeling of fulfilment is represented in the mind of the agent as being something that is objectively good. In the case of Sisyphus, even if he is fulfilled, he misrepresents the source of his fulfilment as good. So Wolf argues that the meaningfulness of an activity or goal is a function not only of one’s being fulfilled in engaging in it/pursuing it, but the feeling of fulfilment also needs to be a fitting response to the activity or goal. And it is only a fitting response if the activity or goal is objectively pursuit-worthy. What would render an activity or goal objectively pursuit-worthy? Objective pursuit-worthiness is in part owing to the value of the end or activity coming from outside of oneself. Wolf admits that determining objective pursuit-worthiness is not easy, and involves a process of discovery. A possibility not explicitly endorsed by Wolf (but not rejected by her, either) is that an activity or goal is objectively pursuit-worthy if engaging in that activity is conducive to the cultivation of virtues. My suggestion is that, so long as an activity is generally conducive to developing character traits and intellectual traits that will enhance and not impede the flourishing of both an agent and those with whom they interact, it is objectively pursuit-worthy.

      Intellectual and character growth holistically, in a positive manner. That is the objective worthiness of any task. These goals, must be outlined in any activity undertaken, and their worth must be scaled according to our own standards. Because time is limited, it serves us well to maximise the objective worthiness that we extract from any task/activity/job/career. Thus time frames must also be defined. A multifaceted growth mindset requires a constant reexamination of all these aspect- i.e.- objective worthiness and time frame. An unexamined life is not worth living, and this shall be applied ona daily basis. One must recognise where they lose time, fill those holes, and proceed to extract some meaning from it.

  6. Oct 2021
  7. Jul 2021
    1. The most common impression is that a developer is someone who is a genius and is able to process massive algorithms in their head in a computer-like way to produce code. This is a misguided idea. Developers are just regular people who have invested their time to learn a programming language and to understand the tools, techniques, nuances, and quirks of the technology they are using to produce results. Any professional job, be it a bricklayer, plumber, or indeed a developer, requires you to learn the tools of the trade to build what people need. A developer, by my definition, is simply someone who creates something out of nothing. A property developer takes a piece of land and produces homes for people to live in. A web developer produces apps or websites from nothing.

      How to create a developer mindset

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  8. Oct 2020
    1. Learning & Development Best Practices from the Top Silicon Valley Companies

      Interesting read about what top tech companies are doing to promote a growth mindset within their company. From Google to Amazon each company has a different approach that is working for them.

      7/10

  9. Jul 2020
  10. May 2019
    1. The summary article about growth and fixed mindsets written from the perspective of high school student teaching but it seems that this can be used for all levels of students and individuals.

  11. Apr 2019
    1. The music we listen to highly impacts our decision making, especially as adolescents. Adolescents are extremely impressionable, and the music they listen to has a great impact on how they decide to live their day to day lives. Popular musicians are seen as role models by the people who idolize them, and adolescents may try to represents the songs in which they favor through their actions every day.

      Recent studies have found that adolescents who listen to music that supports substance abuse and violence have a greater chance to act upon what they listen to. What young adults and teenagers listen to through music and popular media will affect their decision making process. Specifically with substance abuse, and there is a direct uptake in use of illegal substances by adolescents who listen to music that promotes such activities. This can cause a whole societal problem considering most of todays popular music among adolescents touches upon substance abuse and violence. Adolescents are extremely impressionable and the music they listen can shape how a person tries to act, or represent themselves.

  12. Feb 2019
    1. We refer to a way of life

      I view that through the lens of mindsets; I get there by learning that, when confronted with a life-threatening diagnosis, taking full ownership of the dx can save lives. I map that to strategies for preventing life-threatening diagnoses (think: all the complex, urgent issues about which Douglas Engelbart spoke).

  13. Sep 2017
    1. The major situations for growth mindset are: When we do not know an answer When we make error When we experience failure When we are anxious.

      Moments that are prime for "Growth Mindset"

  14. Sep 2016
    1. It's far better, Dweck says, to encourage a growth mindset, in which children believe that brains and talent are merely a starting point, and that abilities can be developed through hard work and continued intellectual risk-taking.
  15. Jun 2016
    1. If we don’t force kids to come to school in order to change their ‘mindsets’, why ARE they here? 

      To develop their own "mindsets" in a nurturing environment that values their agency and supports them in seeing and realizing the possibilities in their lives? :-)

  16. Mar 2016
  17. Aug 2015
    1. The most common bit of concrete advice offered by Dweck and others enamored of the growth mindset is to praise kids for their effort (“You tried really hard”) rather than for their ability (“You’re really smart”) in order to get them to persevere. (Google the words “praise” and “effort” together: more than 70 million hits.)

      I think the author has understated how feedback works in incremental theory. Neither feedback option is better. They should be connected to the stated learning outcome. The key feature is feedback shoudl not be about the student or pleasing the teacher but about the goal.

  18. Sep 2013
    1. The above are the motives that make men do wrong to others; we are next to consider the states of mind in which they do it, and the persons to whom they do it.

      Straying into psychology