4 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2017
    1. While the title of this report does not really imply anything to contradict the results of the testing of the theory, the content of the report itself leaves room for interpretation as to what these results mean and who it applies to. The main study referenced conducted by the University of Rome (Loffredo) does show that the participants who were given dark chocolate showed a higher acute result than those who were given milk chocolate, their study was made up of a small group of 20. It could also be pointed out that they did not establish a portion of their group who were tested without the ingestion of chocolate to establish a better baseline for their results. Participants endurance on a treadmill was used to measure the effects of the chocolate, but there is no indication of how or if the participants increase in ambulatory movement, or having “warmed up” with their baseline test day may have contributed to the improved results after the chocolate was administered. Another point to note is where the author mentions a previous report she submitted (Aubrey) covering the similarity of the results of the chocolate study to a study on the affects of meditation on the body. While the result may be considered similar, the way the results were achieved were very different. The wording in the studies referenced for the benefits of meditation reflect a psychological improvement as a means for a physical response, while the chocolate experiment was testing a chemical application for a physiological response. This article, although not wrong or misrepresenting the study, simplifies much of the work and applies it to the general public. The author does manage to address that the study is incomplete, as an afterthought and could easily be interpreted as having less weight than the argument for chocolate treatment by simply being under represented or under explained. Further investigation is definitely needed to understand the “how and why” of the affects of chocolate/polyphenols on our bodies before we can set any sort of prescription in place. The study would need to be much more comprehensive or added to others that test this same result on other demographics to determine if the affects can be replicated on everyone, or to narrow down if they only get this result with those who have PAD.

      Aubrey, A. (2008, August 21). To Lower Blood Pressure, Open Up And Say 'Om'. Retrieved November 09, 2017, from https://www.npr.org/2008/08/21/93796200/to-lower-blood-pressure-open-up-and-say-om MPH, M. G. (2014, March 01). Meditation for Psychological Stress and Well-being. Retrieved November 09, 2017, from https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/1809754 Loffredo, L., Perri, L., Catasca, E., Pignatelli, P., Brancorsini, M., Nocella, C., . . . Violi, F. (2014, August 21). Dark Chocolate Acutely Improves Walking Autonomy in Patients With Peripheral Artery Disease. Retrieved November 09, 2017, from http://jaha.ahajournals.org/content/3/4/e001072

  2. May 2017
    1. Using data from a large Danish health study, researchers have found an association between chocolate consumption and a lowered risk for atrial fibrillation, the irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke, heart failure and other serious problems.
    1. Epicatechin is known to prompt cells that line blood vessels to release extra nitric oxide, a substance that has multiple effects in the body. Nitric oxide slightly increases vasodilation, or a widening of the veins and arteries, improving blood flow and cardiac function. It also gooses muscle cells to take in more blood sugar, providing them with more energy, and it enhances the passage of oxygen into cells.
  3. Dec 2016
    1. The law bars his nominees from serving until they account for conflicts of interest. So far, they haven’t.

      Not law bars - chocolate bars. (This is a test)