170 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. May 2021
    1. Thanks for an awesome post. I think that I have quite similar ideas to how you think about notes and note-taking, although the terminology is different. But even so, you raised several points that were not only linked to my own thinking, but gave me new thoughts and ideas to work with. Cheers for that.

      I was just about to ask you what your system looked like Michael, but then I realized that you've tucked many of them into Hypothes.is at https://via.hypothes.is/https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2020/11/100-days-in-obsidian-pt-4-writing-notes/

    2. Ton delineates his ideas between notions, notes, ideas, and work notes. It's not too dissimilar to the ideas others like Maggie Appleton have written about various smaller pieces being built up from small "seedlings" into larger evergreen pieces within a digital gardens framing.

      I do like the idea of emergent outlines he notes over Ahrens' speculative outlines.

    1. I love the phrase "elephant paths" (the correct translation?) for maps of content.

      I also like the idea of having a set up for doing digital captures of physical notebook pages. I'll have to consider how to do this most easily. I should also look back and evaluate how to continue improving my digital process as well.

  3. Apr 2021
    1. Millions of those displaced have one or multiple disabilities.

      Millions of people affected by humanitarian disasters experience disabilities.

    1. Here are two examples from about 5,000 that I have accumulated since medical school: JG061210        m         AP Abscess I&D     “Pus Volcano” AR090808       f           Fever Cellulitis US-guided IV   in IVDU            Forgot to listen for murmur

      Example of the author's notes. JG probably the initial of patient, followed by the date m is the gender/sex AP abscess is the diagnosis The second line is the learning point, procedure, or a piece of the patient's story. The third is freestyle.

    2. every patient I see gets two or three lines in a pocket journal. The first line lists the patient’s initials, gender, date seen, and chief complaint or diagnosis. On the second line, I’ll note a learning point, any procedure I performed, and one other piece of the patient’s story. The more random the better—captured correctly, a strange component of the interaction can jog my memory of the entire encounter.

      Interesting structure. Might be able to start from here.

    3. SOAP only dictates an order of information, not content or style. The writing task’s transition from labored struggle (for students) to automatic function (for senior residents) is accompanied by improved readability.

      Important. SOAP only dictates an order, not style nor content. The quest is to improve readability and transfer information as objective as possible, without losing any important narrative transmitted orally from our patient. It includes how we take notes for our future self.

  4. Mar 2021
    1. In the attached YouTube video Dan talks through his post as usual, but he has the added bonus here of showing a split screen of his annotated copy of the book with his Obsidian notebook open. We then see a real time transcription of his note taking process of moving from scant highlights in the book to more fleshed out thoughts and notes in his notebook. We also see him cross referencing various materials for alternate definitions and resources.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HBL-c_nXXQ

  5. Feb 2021
    1. Others on the page here (specifically Dpthomas87's A, B, C) have done a great job at outlining their methods which I'm generally following. So I'll focus a bit more on the mechanics.

      I rely pretty heavily on Hypothes.is for most of my note taking, highlights, and annotations. This works whether a paper is online or as a pdf I read online or store locally and annotate there.

      Then I use RSS to pipe my data from Hypothes.is into a text file in OneDrive for my Obsidian vault using IFTTT.com. I know that a few are writing code for the Hypothes.is API to port data directly into Roam Research presently; I hope others might do it for Obsidian as well.)

      Often at the end of the day or end of the week, I'll go through my drafts folder everything is in to review things, do some light formatting and add links, tags, or other meta data and links to related ideas.

      Using Hypothes.is helps me get material into the system pretty quickly without a lot of transcription (which doesn't help my memory or retention). And the end of the day or end of week review helps reinforce things as well as help to surface other connections.

      I'm hoping that as more people use Hypothesis for social annotation, the cross conversations will also be a source of more helpful cross-linking of ideas and thought.

      I prefer to keep my notes as atomic as I can.

      For some smaller self-contained things like lectures, I may keep a handful of notes together rather than splitting them apart, but they may be linked to larger structures like longer courses or topics of study.

      If an article only has one or two annotations I'll keep them together in the same note, but books more often have dozens or hundreds of notes which I keep in separate files.

      For those who don't have a clear idea of what or why they're doing this, I highly recommend reading [[Sönke Ahrens]]' book Smart Notes.

      I do have a handful of templates for books, articles, and zettels to help in prompting me to fill in appropriate meta data for various notes more quickly. For this I'm using the built-in Templates plug-in and then ctrl-shift-T to choose a specific template as necessary.

      Often I'll use Hypothes.is and tag things as #WantToRead to quickly bookmark things into my vault for later thought, reading, or processing.

      For online videos and lectures, I'll often dump YouTube URLs into https://docdrop.org/, which then gives a side by side transcript for more easily jumping around as well as annotating directly from the transcript if I choose.

      I prefer to use [[links]] over #tags for connecting information. Most of the tags I use tend to be for organizational or more personal purposes like #WantToRead which I later delete when done.

      When I run across interesting questions or topics that would make good papers or areas of future research I'll use a tag like #OpenQuestion, so when I'm bored I can look at a list of what I might like to work on next.

      Syndicated copies: https://forum.obsidian.md/t/research-phd-academics/1446/64?u=chrisaldrich

    1. This is what I mean when I say Roam “increases the expected value of my notes.” Now that I’m using Roam, I’m confident my notes will remain useful long into the future, so I’ve increased the quality and quantity of the notes I take.

      Well interlinked notes increases their future expected value which in turn gives one more reason to not only take more notes, but to take better notes.

    2. In most note-taking apps, you jot something down quickly and only use it a few times before losing track of it.

      This is a major problem of most note taking applications. Having the ability to inter-link one's notes in ways that allow one to revisit, revise, and rearrange them is incredibly valuable.

    1. cultural capital

      Introduced by Pierre Bourdieu in the 1970s, the concept has been utilized across a wide spectrum of contemporary sociological research. Cultural capital refers to ‘knowledge’ or ‘skills’ in the broadest sense. Thus, on the production side, cultural capital consists of knowledge about comportment (e.g., what are considered to be the right kinds of professional dress and attitude) and knowledge associated with educational achievement (e.g., rhetorical ability). On the consumption side, cultural capital consists of capacities for discernment or ‘taste’, e.g., the ability to appreciate fine art or fine wine—here, in other words, cultural capital refers to ‘social status acquired through the ability to make cultural distinctions,’ to the ability to recognize and discriminate between the often-subtle categories and signifiers of a highly articulated cultural code. I'm quoting here from (and also heavily paraphrasing) Scott Lash, ‘Pierre Bourdieu: Cultural Economy and Social Change’, in this reader.

  6. Jan 2021
    1. Remember that notes are only an intermediate step towards understanding. Having a beautiful set of perfectly written notes is useless if you don’t understand the subject you are trying to learn.

      too many people forget this simple fact

  7. Oct 2020
    1. While you do so, you can even take notes to keep track of the evolution of your interpretation.

      This is exactly the opposite of what Luhmann was doing (he only read things once)

    1. Consider that no single step in the process of turning raw ideas into finished pieces of writing is particularly difficult. It isn’t very hard to write down notes in the first place. Nor is turning a group of notes into an outline very demanding. It also isn’t much of a challenge to turn a working outline full of relevant arguments into a rough draft. And polishing a well-conceived rough draft into a final draft is trivial. So if each individual step is so easy, why do we find the overall experience of writing so grueling? Because we try to do all the steps at once. Each of the activities that make up “writing” – reading, reflecting, having ideas, making connections, distinguishing terms, finding the right words, structuring, organizing, editing, correcting, and rewriting – require a very different kind of attention.
    2. Writing then is best seen not only as a tool for thinking but as a tool for personal growth.
    3. No one ever really starts from scratch. Anything they come up with has to come from prior experience, research, or other understanding. But because they haven’t acted on this fact, they can’t track ideas back to their origins. They have neither supporting material nor accurate sources. Since they haven’t been taking notes from the start, they either have to start with something completely new (which is risky) or retrace their steps (which is boring). It’s no wonder that nearly every guide to writing begins with “brainstorming.” If you don’t have notes, you have no other option. But this is a bit like a financial advisor telling a 65-year-old to start saving for retirement – too little, too late.
    4. Principle #10: Save contradictory ideas
    5. Here are a few questions to ask yourself as you turn fleeting and literature notes into permanent notes: How does the new information contradict, correct, support, or add to what I already know? How can I combine ideas to generate something new? What questions are triggered by these new ideas?
    6. Principle #8: Organize your notes by context, not by topic
    7. instead of filing things away according to where they came from, you file them according to where they’re going. This is the essential difference between organizing like a librarian and organizing like a writer.
    8. Luhmann actually had two slip-boxes: the first was the “bibliographical” slip-box, which contained brief notes on the content of the literature he read along with a citation of the source; the second “main” slip-box contained the ideas and theories he developed based on those sources. Both were wooden boxes containing paper index cards. 

      I'm already doing this same sort of thing in my TiddlyWiki and simply using tags to distinguish the sources, books, etc.

    9. The 8 Steps of Taking Smart Notes Ahrens recommends the following 8 steps for taking notes: Make fleeting notes Make literature notes Make permanent notes Now add your new permanent notes to the slip-box Develop your topics, questions and research projects bottom up from within the slip-box Decide on a topic to write about from within the slip-box Turn your notes into a rough draft Edit and proofread your manuscript
    10. This is a reasonable synopsis for why to keep a zettlekasten or commonplace book and how to use it to create new material. It fits roughly in line with my overall experience in doing these things.

    11. Luhmann’s slip-box grew to become an equal thinking partner in his work. He described his system as his secondary memory (zweitgedächtnis), alter ego, or reading memory (lesegedächtnis).
    1. The Instapaper highlights go to my Evernote inbox, then I copy them from Evernote into Roam (annoying, I know, hopefully the Roam API will be set up soon!) 

      Getting data into any of these note taking tools quickly always seems to be the most difficult part of the process.

    1. I kept losing content that I edited out and then wanted to put it back in.

      This is where bits like version control of academic documents can be incredibly valuable!

      See: https://boffosocko.com/2014/09/17/revision-control/

    2. But thirdly, and most valuably, the template gives you a big space at the bottom to write sentences that summarise the page.  That is, you start writing your critical response on the notes themselves.

      I do much this same thing, however, I'm typically doing it using Hypothes.is to annotate and highlight. These pieces go back to my own website where I can keep, categorize, and even later search them. If I like, I'll often do these sorts of summaries on related posts themselves (usually before I post them publicly if that's something I'm planning on doing for a particular piece.)

    1. If you’d like to differentiate between the various functions a paragraph in a text can have, look out for signal words. For example, the following literal devices may indicate that the function is to build a mental model: schema, allegory, analogy, hypothesis, metaphor, representation, simile, theory. Put a corresponding “model” mark next to these.
    1. The students in Raphael Folsom’s Spanish Borderlands course read primary sources on a weekly basis. Rather than taking notes on 3×5 index cards as we did when I was a kid, the students take the same type of note in the Drupal system. They fill out some basic bibliographic information about the source, write a short summary of the source, and then take a note about an interesting facet of the text.

      I've been trying this sort of thing out with a TiddlyWiki for a while and have got a reasonable sort of workflow for doing it. The key is to reduce the overhead so that one can quickly take notes in a manner that interlinks them and makes it seem worthwhile to come back to them to review and potentially reorganize them. Doing this practice in public has a lot of value as well. I'll have to come back and look at some of how this was built at a later time.

    1. Obsidian is a powerful knowledge base that works on top of a local folder of plain text Markdown files.

      Alright, I think I may now have things set to use an IFTTT applet to take my Hypothes.is feed and dump it into a file on OneDrive.

      The tiny amount of clean up to the resultant file isn't bad. In fact, a bit of it is actually good as it can count as a version of spaced repetition towards better recall of my notes.

      The one thing I'll potentially miss is the tags, which Hypothes.is doesn't include in their feeds (tucked into the body would be fine), but I suppose I could add them as internal wiki links directly if I wanted.

      I suspect that other storage services that work with IFTTT should work as well.

      Details in a blogpost soon...

      Testing cross-linking:

      See Also:

      • [[Obsidian]]
      • [[Hypothes.is]]
      • [[note taking]]
      • [[zettlekasten]]
      • [[commonplace books]]
      • [[productivity]]

      hat tip to Hypothesis, for such a generally wonderful user interface for making annotating, highlighting, bookmarking, and replying to web pages so easy!

    1. 大概过程

      大概过程:

      1. 灰度化
      2. 采用 Gamma 校正法对输入图像归一化
      3. 计算图像每个像素的梯度(包括大小和方向)
      4. 将图像分块
      5. 统计每块的梯度直方图(不同梯度的个数)
      6. 没几个块组成一个大块 steps
  8. Sep 2020
    1. descent direction, or an improving direction

      I don't think that both can be true.

    2. radius c

      I think this should be sqrt of c.

    3. Matrix norm

      Not needed or missing?

    4. positive definite

      This should be semi-positive definite.

    1. Writing in the margins has always been an essential activity for students.

      I never really got into the habit of writing in the margins of books, it was something that never really occurred to me. While I am still hesitant to write in the margins of physical books, doing so digitally does appeal. Something I am starting to get more into, now that I'm on the journey to getting my Arts and Humanities degree.

    1. Most writers don’t write to express what they think. They write to figure out what they think. Writing is a process of discovery.

      This is good point about blogging, however it's also a different way of thinking about writing than using e.g. Zettelkasten, where the thinking process is within the boundary of slip-box, but the outcome is composed from the notes you have.

  9. Jun 2020
    1. a style developed by engineering professor Susan Reynolds to accompany her lectures

      note taking resource

    2. getting trained in specific note-taking strategies can significantly improve the quality of notes and the amount of material they remember later. (Boyle, 2013; Rahmani & Sadeghi, 2011; Robin, Foxx, Martello, & Archable, 1977).

      Let me dive into these articles.

      Rahmani & Sadeghi, 2011 found that teaching Iranian EFL students how to take notes using graphic organizers, the experiment group did better in recall and comprehension tests.

      Boyle, 2013 used a method called "strategic note taking" which performed better than regular note-taking methods. What does regular and strategic note taking measures mean?

      Boyle's paper goes over strategic and guided note-taking.

      guided notes

      Guided Notes are teacher-prepared handouts that outline lectures, audiovisual presentations, or readings, but leave blank space for students to fill in key concepts, facts, definitions, etc. Guided Notes promote active engagement during lecture or independent reading, provide full and accurate notes for use as a study guide, and help students to identify the most important information covered.

      source


      strategic note taking

      Before the lecture begins, the students identify the lecture topic and relate it to what they already know. This helps to activate prior knowledge and make information more meaningful.

      During the lecture, the students record notes by clustering three to six main points (or related pieces of information) and immediately summarizing them for each section of the lecture. Typically, this process will be repeated multiple times throughout the lecture. The clustering of ideas helps students remember the information, and summarizing helps them to monitor comprehension and store the information in long-term memory. To effectively teach students how to record important information, and summarize the content, the teacher can introduce the students to the CUES strategy. The teacher should do this while teaching students how to effectively use the strategic note-taking paper, making sure to emphasize that the C (Cluster) and U (Use) steps should be used when listing lecture points in the section titled “Name 3 to 6 main points with details as they are being discussed,” the E (Enter) step should remind them to enter vocabulary terms in the section titled “New Vocabulary or Terms,” and the S (Summarize) step should be used to quickly summarize the clustered lecture points under the “Summary” section. In addition, it is important that teachers encourage students to use abbreviations as they often do while texting to help them to record notes quickly.

      At the end of the lecture, the students should always list and describe five important lecture points that they remember. Although this serves as a quick review of the lecture, students should review their notes to help them retain and recall the information presented during the lecture.

      source

      PDF Worksheet

      source: local file | DOI: 10.1177/0741932511410862

    1. Good intro on Zettelkasten note management method.


      Further reference:

      The Zettelkasten Method - Lesswrong 2 »Link«. on how to create "physical" Zettelkasten notes.

  10. May 2020
    1. Shweta, F., Murugadoss, K., Awasthi, S., Venkatakrishnan, A., Puranik, A., Kang, M., Pickering, B. W., O’Horo, J. C., Bauer, P. R., Razonable, R. R., Vergidis, P., Temesgen, Z., Rizza, S., Mahmood, M., Wilson, W. R., Challener, D., Anand, P., Liebers, M., Doctor, Z., … Badley, A. D. (2020). Augmented Curation of Unstructured Clinical Notes from a Massive EHR System Reveals Specific Phenotypic Signature of Impending COVID-19 Diagnosis [Preprint]. Infectious Diseases (except HIV/AIDS). https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.04.19.20067660

    1. Wiki-Style creation of new pages is cool, but there is no tracking of changes. This means you can create a new page simply by referencing it right from your writing, e.g. I like [[JS]]. But should you later rename the JS page to JavaScript, any of your old reference will go awry, creating yet another new note called "JS".

      Also automatic backlinks would be really helpful, to see where references are coming from.

  11. Apr 2020
  12. Mar 2020
    1. Introductory Videos

      table properties, you can create two columns, 1 row, merge the heading column. Modify the heading column size to be closer to the font size.

  13. Jan 2020
    1. In an observational study of 14 patients, no subjects developed any cardiac or skeletal disease after receiving doses from 25- to 150mcg over a two-year period.41

      Note that the high dose was because they were increasing the dose based on symptoms. That is to say, as the thyroid gland produced less thyroid hormone, they increased liothyronine dose to compensate.

    1. The substitution of l-T3 for l-T4 at equivalent doses (relative to the pituitary) reduced body weight and resulted in greater thyroid hormone action on the lipid metabolism, without detected differences in cardiovascular function or insulin sensitivity.

      This implies that T4 and T3 are not identical, but I want to check the study further to see if half-life comes into play. The T3 group could theoretically have higher daily thyroidergic exposure, but maintain TSH because they experience a daily dip. Multiple dosing at least partly solves this issue. Controlled release tablets would be ideal.

    1. In almost all cases the genetic basis of RTH lies in mutation of the carboxyl-terminus of the ß-thyroid hormone receptor. RTH is a dominant disorder, except in one family; most individuals are heterozygous for the mutant allele.

      So, given that thyroid hormone resistance does exist, the remaining question is whether it is common enough to explain some cases of CFS or similar conditions. Unfortunately this paper is not in english, but the abstract provides enough information to google more.

    1. altered thyroid gland function affects vasopressin and oxytocin release from the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system in the state of equilibrated water metabolism

      I ought read the full study to see the proposed mechanism. The vasopressin effect is not surprising at all, but the oxytocin effect was unexpected for me. That may be because I know more about vasopressin than I do oxytocin.

    1. At the final study visit, subjects were asked whether they thought their L-T4 doses at the end of the study were higher, lower, or unchanged from the start of the study and which of the two doses they preferred. Subjects were not able to accurately ascertain changes in L-T4 doses (P = 0.54)

      The study does not provide enough information to determine whether this is meaningful. It appears to be meaningless. If they had used a crossover design, then this might be useful.

  14. Dec 2019
    1. The sodium-restricted diet group received a regimen aiming a maximum intake of 3 g of sodium per day (equivalent to 7.5 g of sodium chloride).

      That sounds incredibly high to me. 3000 mg is the absolute maximum intake that could ever be considered 'low' sodium. Under 1500 is usually considered ideal. Would, then, a diet aiming for half the sodium be twice as effective?

  15. Nov 2019
    1. between 535 and 900 kcal, depending on age, sex, weight, and height (16).

      In other words, it was isocaloric between the two groups, in that similar subjects were fed similar calories.

  16. Sep 2019
    1. A “Veillance Contract,” for example, would deny the surveillant the right to use its recordings as evidence if it doesn’t allow others the right to make their own recordings.

      I like this idea

    2. The recorded becoming the recorder

      This whole section would be the bases of my whole argument along with transhumanist ideas about tech and the future of augmentation

    1. Jacob Amedie, Santa Clara University

      Author. Learn more about him from his resume: https://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/xJUyg0OnJ8LcNx

    2. nts5.

      This paper uses footnotes instead of MLA in-text citations like you will use. If you were to use a paraphrase from a source like this, you would put (Campbell 76) in place of the 5. Campbell is the author and 76 is the page number.

  17. doc-0o-08-docs.googleusercontent.com doc-0o-08-docs.googleusercontent.com
    1. (Manning 2014c, p. 1158)

      This is an example of an APA citation that uses a page number. The MLA version would look like this (Manning 1158). 1158 is the page number.

    2. (Duggan 2013).

      This article is using APA. We are learning MLA in this class this semester. The MLA citation would delete the year (2013) and only inlclude the author's last name (Duggan).

  18. Aug 2019
    1. Context notes are used as a map to a series of notes. A context note that outlines a more complex concept or broader subject, using links to other notes in the process. For example, while I’m reading a book, I build an outline of the things I find relevant, based on my highlights and notes of the book. Each of the outline’s items links to a separate note explaining the idea in more detail, and usually contains the highlighted text of the book.
    2. Each note is also given tags for classification. Good tagging helps with accuracy when searching. The method’s recommendation is to use tags for objects, and not for subjects4. In the same note, I write down the ideas I had in mind when highlighting the paragraph, or any connection that comes to mind during this process.
    3. The basic idea behind Zettelkasten is to build a repository of the knowledge you gain through the years. The idea is similar to what Paul Jun, of Creative Mastery, writes about keeping a Commonplace Book, or Ryan Holiday’s notecard system. Zettelkasten adds the powerful idea of linking notes to create a web of interlinked knowledge.
  19. May 2019
    1. ? 4-viii-51

      Date added by Rossell in pencil in box where postage stamp would go. Context indicates that Schlauch must have sent this postcard before she sent the next letter, dated 4 August 1951.

  20. Apr 2019
    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the third installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in June of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the second installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in May of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the first installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in April of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the ninth installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in December of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the eighth installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in November of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the seventh installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in October of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the sixth installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in September of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the fifth installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in August of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

    1. The majority of the annotations on this page draw from the following critical editions of The War of the Worlds, which will be cited and tagged according to the last name(s) of the editor(s) of that edition:

      DANAHAY: Martin A. Danahay. The War of the Worlds. Broadview Press, 2003.

      HUGHES AND GEDULD: David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld, eds. A Critical Edition of The War of the Worlds: H. G. Wells’s Scientific Romance, with Introduction and Notes by David Y. Hughes and Harry M. Geduld. Indiana UP, 1993.

      MCCONNELL: Frank McConnell, ed. The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds: A Critical Edition. Oxford UP, 1977.

      STOVER: Leon Stover. The War of the Worlds: A Critical Text of the 1898 London First Edition, with an Introduction, Illustrations and Appendices. McFarland and Company, Inc, 2001.

      Madeline Gangnes has added additional annotations and resources, especially those that address materials related to Pearson's Magazine and adaptations of the text. They are cited with their source(s) (where applicable) and tagged as GANGNES.

    2. This page incorporates several elements. Its main body is a transcription of the text of the fourth installment of H. G. Wells's novel The War of the Worlds as it was published in Pearson's Magazine in July of 1897. This text was created by Madeline Gangnes by comparing the Project Gutenberg text with the digital facsimiles of Pearson's Magazine generously hosted by HathiTrust. Facsimile pages of the installment are interspersed throughout this page. Each image includes a detailed caption in order to facilitate text-to-speech accessibility. Textual markers that indicate the beginning and end of each page's text are incorporated for text-to-speech and to make clear which text corresponds to which page of the magazine.

  21. Mar 2019
  22. Jan 2019
    1. intellectually lazy

      Word choice! What does it mean to be "intellectually lazy"? I think a great example of this can be seen when we talked last class about note taking and how taking notes should be a continual process, one which you constantly refer to and add to your notes, as opposed to taking notes and not looking at them again until you need something.

  23. futurepress.github.io futurepress.github.io
    1. The bar-room was now full of the boarders who had been dropping in the night previous, and w

      this is just for test

    1. Vulvar cancer statistics Vulvar cancer is rare. According to the American Cancer Society, about 6,200 women in the United States are diagnosed with it each year.  Vulvar cancer usually grows slowly and may begin as precancerous changes that can be treated before they become cancer. The median age of diagnosis for Vulvar cancer is 68, and the disease's five-year survival rate is about 71%.

      This is a great section that answers a lot of searcher's intended questions!! Consider a "statistics" section for each cancer type.

  24. Oct 2018
    1. Artifact Type: Syllabus Source URL: http://engl165lg.wordpress.com/ Creator: Amanda Phillips (University of California-Davis)

      interested

    2. Source URL: http://www.auntiepixelante.com/twine/

      note to self

    1. Enjoy this work!
    2. Be ambitious for the work and not for the reward.
    3. Take no notice of anyone you don’t respect.
    4. Never stop when you are stuck. You may not be able to solve the problem, but turn aside and write something else. Do not stop altogether.
    5. Turn up for work. Discipline allows creative freedom. No discipline equals no freedom.
    6. “Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving.”
  25. Sep 2018
    1. The exemplar at London (UK), British Library (General Reference Collection 1602/138) has been digitised and is available at https://www.salamanca.school/en/mirador.html?wid=W0011

    1. The exemplar at Salamanca (Es), Universidad de Salamanca has been digitised and is available at https://www.salamanca.school/en/mirador.html?wid=W0008

    1. An exemplar at Berlin (De), Staatsbibliothek Preußischer Kulturbesitz has been digitised and is available at https://www.salamanca.school/en/mirador.html?wid=W0007

    1. An exemplar at Salamanca (Es), Universidad de Salamanca (BG/5480) has been digitised by the the project 'The School of Salamanca. A Digital Collection of Sources and a Dictionary of its Juridical-Political Language.' (http://salamanca.adwmainz.de) and is available at [https://www.salamanca.school/en/mirador.html?wid=W0055](https://www.salamanca.school/en/mirador.html?wid=W0055

    1. An exemplar at Salamanca (Es), Universidad de Salamanca has been digitised by the the project 'The School of Salamanca. A Digital Collection of Sources and a Dictionary of its Juridical-Political Language.' (http://salamanca.adwmainz.de) and is available at [https://www.salamanca.school/en/mirador.html?wid=W0004](https://www.salamanca.school/en/mirador.html?wid=W0004

    1. An exemplar at Salamanca (Es), Universidad de Salamanca has been digitised by the the project 'The School of Salamanca. A Digital Collection of Sources and a Dictionary of its Juridical-Political Language.' (http://salamanca.adwmainz.de) and is available at https://www.salamanca.school/en/mirador.html?wid=W0003

    1. Ceci est une note de page. Elle peut inclure un lien vers une autre page, que celle-ci soit connectée ou non via Hypothes.is. Voyez dans l'URL le préfixe qui assure que l'on peut annoter celle-ci. Mais avec ce blogue on n'en a pas besoin car son auteur a déjà inclus un code permettant de l'annoter par défaut (à condition de s'être créée un compte hypothes.is).

  26. Aug 2018
    1. The exemplar at Oxford (UK), Bodleian Library (Inc. e. S6.1500.1) has been digitised and can be examined at https://digital.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/inquire/p/2e52084d-d656-452c-a8d7-7272f08b8590

    1. The exemplar at Oxford (UK), Bodleian Library (Inc. d. S6.1500.1) has been digitised and can be examined at https://digital.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/inquire/p/52b730d3-a1dc-4fd9-b047-90e5479fdd3d

    1. The exemplar at Oxford (UK), Bodleian Library (Inc. e. S4.1496.1) has been digitised and can be examined at https://digital.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/inquire/p/93d172c4-c25e-41eb-b56f-85a3c58e4901

    2. The exemplar at Oxford (UK), Bodleian Library (Inc. e. S4.1496.1) has been digitised and can be examined at https://digital.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/inquire/p/93d172c4-c25e-41eb-b56f-85a3c58e4901

  27. Apr 2018
  28. Mar 2018
  29. Feb 2018
    1. Abhráin

      The formatting of e-books on Internet Archive does not allow hypothesis.is users to annotate the books’ text. In annotating Hyde’s Love Songs of Connacht for the EN6009 Annotate-A-Thon, I have attached annotations to the text beneath the scanned images. Extracts and corresponding page numbers are placed at the beginning of each annotation, in order to properly contextualize my responses.

  30. Dec 2017
  31. Nov 2017
    1. In study 2, why did the authors not employ a an intervention for the longhand note takers as well but only for the laptop group?

    2. Better paraphrasing and less word overlaps for longhand note takers. Were the students randomised? Did the students have similar background and experiences in note taking in each medium selected? How was that known?

  32. Jul 2017
    1. This guideline covers diagnosing and managing bladder cancer in people 18 and above referred from primary care with suspected bladder cancer

      Is this visible to just me?

    2. This guideline covers diagnosing and managing bladder cancer in people 18 and above referred from prima

      Is this note private

  33. Jun 2017
    1. The process of evaluating current research status and identifying future research themes was facilitated by a pre-conference questionnaire through which GADRI members identified a sample of 323 research projects that represent current research.

      Make an annotation.

  34. Apr 2017
    1. 屏幕不再是全贴合工艺

      IFixit 的拆解发现非全贴合(全层压)屏幕意味着玻璃面板和 LCD 面板可以很容易地分离,大幅度降低碎屏后的维修成本。如果 iPad 5 定位低端市场,那么此举是合理的。

  35. Mar 2017
    1. The result of this externalization, Blair notes, is that we come to think of long-term memory as something that is stored elsewhere, in “media outside the mind.” At the same time, she writes, “notes must be rememorated or absorbed in the short-term memory at least enough to be intelligently integrated into an argument; judgment can only be applied to experiences that are present to the mind.”

      Indeed memory is being atrophied as a result of easy to access externalization, the temptation to just offload it onto the computer makes the forgetting curve even sharper. The concepts don't present to the mind when needed because since we didn't commit to our memory we can hardly perceive correlations to what we previously read. Simply we miss our chances to recall & connect new concepts and knowledge because we don't commit them to our memory.

    1. 广色域

      当且设备屏幕支持广色域且操作系统支持色彩管理时,才会以正确的方式显示广色域图片。

      目前已经确定支持广色域和色彩管理的移动设备:

      • iPad Pro 9.7 (2016)
      • iPhone 7 / 7 Plus (2016)
      • MacBook Pro (Late 2016)
      • iMac 4K / 5K (Late 2015 and later)
    2. 10bit

      在 10bit 面板上过渡平滑、在 8bit 面板上会有明显的竖纹(色块)。

      目前已经确定的 10bit 面板移动设备:

      • iPad Pro 9.7 (2016)
      • iPhone 7 / 7 Plus (2016)
    3. 字体

      当且仅当你的操作系统中已经安装相应字体时,这里才会以对应的字体显示。由于中文字体体积往往过大,很少有网站会动态加载中文字体。

    1. gocentric analysis is primarily concerned with describing how individuals are embedded in local social structures and, ultimately, how these individual indices of social structure relate to varied outcomes

      My research doesn't actually focus on individuals so this is interesting.

    1. Geekbench 4 跑分不到 iPhone 7 Plus 的十分之一

      iPad 3:316/381 vs. iPhone 7 Plus:3460/5579