111 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2020
  2. Dec 2019
  3. Nov 2019
    1. Null Components should never have children - they'd never be rendered.
    2. Aligning closely with the <Injector_ > naming convention, Null Components are denoted with a prefix and postfix _ (e.g. <_NullComponent_ />).
    3. The idea is that the additional prefix _ of a Null Component symbolizes that it adds even less to the DOM than an Injector. I picture the name falling through to become just the _, like the unused argument convention in javascript functions: const handleEvent = (_, id) => { console.log(id) } .
    1. However, in this case you would lose the possibility to render something in between. You are strictly coupled to the higher-order component's render method. If you need to add something in between of the currency components, you would have to do it in the higher-order component. It would be quite similar as you have done it previously by rendering the currency components straight away in the Amount component. If using a render prop component instead, you would be flexible in your composition.
    2. For the sake of completeness, the following code demonstrates that the problem could be solved with a higher-order component (HOC) as well:
    1. The terms “controlled” and “uncontrolled” usually refer to form inputs, but they can also describe where any component’s data lives. Data passed in as props can be thought of as controlled (because the parent component controls that data). Data that exists only in internal state can be thought of as uncontrolled (because the parent can’t directly change it).
    1. So the main thing this gives us is a way to set indeterminate property of input via an indeterminate property?

      This is misnamed. Doesn't actually give us a tri-state checkbox. Just a binary checkbox.

    1. input.indeterminate = indeterminate

      So the main thing this gives us is a way to set indeterminate property of input via an indeterminate property?

      Not sure how that supposedly gives us a tri-state checkbox.

    1. 3. Deployment as Memory Management

      The entire chapter 3 is worth reading. Great resource on what a package (or more broadly, a component) is in regards to Nix.

      Specifically "3.1 What is a component?"

  4. Oct 2019
    1. However, if more control is needed, you can pass any of these pieces of state as a prop (as indicated above) and that state becomes controlled. As soon as this.props[statePropKey] !== undefined, internally, downshift will determine its state based on your prop's value rather than its own internal state.
    1. We've extracted some key features into separate HOCs to keep the main library as small as possible
  5. Sep 2019
    1. You can control the following props by providing values for them. If you don't, react-select will manage them for you. value / onChange - specify the current value of the control menuIsOpen / onMenuOpen / onMenuClose - control whether the menu is open inputValue / onInputChange - control the value of the search input (changing this will update the available options) If you don't provide these props, you can set the initial value of the state they control: defaultValue - set the initial value of the control defaultMenuIsOpen - set the initial open value of the menu defaultInputValue - set the initial value of the search input

      Example of having props for both ways: value or defaultValue, depending on whether you want it to be controlled or not.

  6. Aug 2019
  7. Jan 2014
    1. A key component of data management is the comprehensive description of the data and contextual information that future researchers need to understand and use the data. This description is particularly important because the natural tendency is for the information content of a data set or database to undergo entropy over time (i.e. data entropy ), ultimately becoming meaningless to scientists and others [ 2 ].

      I agree with the key component mentioned here, but I feel the term data entropy is an unhelpful crutch.